Networks Work and Inequality

Author: Steve McDonald
Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing
ISBN: 9781781905395
Release Date: 2013
Genre: Social Science

The importance of social relationships at work has long been recognized in the social sciences. Interest in this topic has been renewed through scholarly and popular discussions of social capital as well as recent innovations in network data collection and analysis. These developments have allowed researchers to ask a variety of new questions about the role of networks in the world of work and a multitude of approaches to answering those questions. While several monographs have been written on issues related to networks and work, none has simultaneously brought together the range of approaches used to explore this topic. Furthermore, this volume is the first to merge this focus on networks and work with a sociological perspective on inequality. Specifically, the chapters illuminate the processes by which social networks in work organizations can effectively generate, sustain and ameliorate social inequalities across individuals, firms, and occupational fields. In doing so, this volume offers valuable insights that inform researchers and policy makers alike regarding issues of workplace discrimination, diversity and innovation.

Networks Work and Inequality

Author: Steve McDonald
Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing
ISBN: 9781781905395
Release Date: 2013
Genre: Social Science

The importance of social relationships at work has long been recognized in the social sciences. Interest in this topic has been renewed through scholarly and popular discussions of social capital as well as recent innovations in network data collection and analysis. These developments have allowed researchers to ask a variety of new questions about the role of networks in the world of work and a multitude of approaches to answering those questions. While several monographs have been written on issues related to networks and work, none has simultaneously brought together the range of approaches used to explore this topic. Furthermore, this volume is the first to merge this focus on networks and work with a sociological perspective on inequality. Specifically, the chapters illuminate the processes by which social networks in work organizations can effectively generate, sustain and ameliorate social inequalities across individuals, firms, and occupational fields. In doing so, this volume offers valuable insights that inform researchers and policy makers alike regarding issues of workplace discrimination, diversity and innovation.

Research in the Sociology of Work

Author: Steven P. Vallas
Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing
ISBN: 9781786354051
Release Date: 2016-08-26
Genre: Business & Economics

This volume includes contributions which discuss: work and identity, including the experiences of actors and teachers; authority and control at work, including insights from the hospitality and publishing industries; and issues of gender and sexuality in the workplace, including insights on sexual harassment in the workplace.

The Sociology of Work

Author: Steven Peter Vallas
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0195381726
Release Date: 2009
Genre: Social Science

Understanding the world of work is often difficult for students--particularly undergraduates--to grasp. The Sociology of Work: Structures and Inequalities answers the need for a clear, engaging--and affordable--introduction to the basic concepts used by sociologists of work. Throughout, the text links the most up-to-date research and scholarship on work and occupations with their underlying sociological principles. Beginning with a thorough discussion of these core concepts, it goes on to show the historical developments of labor processes, thus allowing students to draw modern, real-world connections. The book also examines the contemporary work scene (both domestic and global), its concurrent occupational structures, and, all too often, its resultant inequalities. While remarkably accessible, The Sociology of Work does not shy away from challenging students with weightier sociological concepts, theories, and methodological issues, as well as less commonly discussed topics like Luddism, the role of gender in the industrial revolution, and the rise and decline of the workers' movement. Comprehensive and versatile, The Sociology of Work: Structures and Inequalities is ideal for courses in the sociology of work and occupations, and the sociology of organizations and corporations, as well as labor studies and human resource management. Features * Incorporates issues of gender and race throughout * Also includes separate and unique chapters on gender (Chapter 11), diversity (Chapter 12), immigration (Chapter 13), and globalization (Chapter 16) * Emphasizes the continuing importance of social theory, both classical and contemporary * Devotes an entire chapter to research methods and data sources

Work and Family in the New Economy

Author: Samantha K. Ammons
Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing
ISBN: 9781784416294
Release Date: 2015-02-25
Genre: Social Science

This volume will focus on innovative research examining how the nature of paid work intersects with family and personal life today. This collection of cutting-edge research will be instrumental in shaping the next wave of work-family scholarship.

Religion Work and Inequality

Author: Lisa Keister
Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing
ISBN: 9781780523477
Release Date: 2002-04-17
Genre: Business & Economics

Work behaviours and inequality in work-based rewards are essential to financial security and general well-being. Although the benefits of receiving work-based rewards, such as income, benefits and retirement packages, are significant, they are not enjoyed uniformly. This title articulates an agenda for better understanding these social processes.

Unanticipated Gains

Author: Mario Luis Small
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199764099
Release Date: 2010-10-05
Genre: Business & Economics

Social capital theorists have shown that some people do better than others in part because they enjoy larger, more supportive, or otherwise more useful networks. But why do some people have better networks than others? Unanticipated Gains argues that the practice and structure of the churches, colleges, firms, gyms, childcare centers, and schools in which people happen to participate routinely matter more than their deliberate "networking." Exploring the experiences of New York City mothers whose children were enrolled in childcare centers, this book examines why a great deal of these mothers, after enrolling their children, dramatically expanded both the size and usefulness of their personal networks. Whether, how, and how much the mother's networks were altered--and how useful these networks were--depended on the apparently trivial, but remarkably consequential, practices and regulations of the centers. The structure of parent-teacher organizations, the frequency of fieldtrips, and the rules regarding drop-off and pick-up times all affected the mothers' networks. Relying on scores of in-depth interviews with mothers, quantitative data on both mothers and centers, and detailed case studies of other routine organizations, Small shows that how much people gain from their connections depends substantially on institutional conditions they often do not control, and through everyday processes they may not even be aware of. Emphasizing not the connections that people make, but the context in which they are made, Unanticipated Gains presents a major new perspective on social capital and on the mechanisms producing social inequality.

On the Move

Author: Filiz Garip
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400883769
Release Date: 2016-11-01
Genre: Social Science

Why do Mexicans migrate to the United States? Is there a typical Mexican migrant? Beginning in the 1970s, survey data indicated that the average migrant was a young, unmarried man who was poor, undereducated, and in search of better employment opportunities. This is the general view that most Americans still hold of immigrants from Mexico. On the Move argues that not only does this view of Mexican migrants reinforce the stereotype of their undesirability, but it also fails to capture the true diversity of migrants from Mexico and their evolving migration patterns over time. Using survey data from over 145,000 Mexicans and in-depth interviews with nearly 140 Mexicans, Filiz Garip reveals a more accurate picture of Mexico-U.S migration. In the last fifty years there have been four primary waves: a male-dominated migration from rural areas in the 1960s and '70s, a second migration of young men from socioeconomically more well-off families during the 1980s, a migration of women joining spouses already in the United States in the late 1980s and ’90s, and a generation of more educated, urban migrants in the late 1990s and early 2000s. For each of these four stages, Garip examines the changing variety of reasons for why people migrate and migrants’ perceptions of their opportunities in Mexico and the United States. Looking at Mexico-U.S. migration during the last half century, On the Move uncovers the vast mechanisms underlying the flow of people moving between nations.

Styling Masculinity

Author: Kristen Barber
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 9780813572659
Release Date: 2016-08-24
Genre: Social Science

The twenty-first century has seen the emergence of a new style of man: the metrosexual. Overwhelmingly straight, white, and wealthy, these impeccably coiffed urban professionals spend big money on everything from facials to pedicures, all part of a multi-billion-dollar male grooming industry. Yet as this innovative study reveals, even as the industry encourages men to invest more in their appearance, it still relies on women to do much of the work. Styling Masculinity investigates how men’s beauty salons have persuaded their clientele to regard them as masculine spaces. To answer this question, sociologist Kristen Barber goes inside Adonis and The Executive, two upscale men’s salons in Southern California. Conducting detailed observations and extensive interviews with both customers and employees, she shows how female salon workers not only perform the physical labor of snipping, tweezing, waxing, and exfoliating, but also perform the emotional labor of pampering their clients and pumping up their masculine egos. Letting salon employees tell their own stories, Barber not only documents occasions when these workers are objectified and demeaned, but also explores how their jobs allow for creativity and confer a degree of professional dignity. In the process, she traces the vast network of economic and social relations that undergird the burgeoning male beauty industry.

Race and the Invisible Hand

Author: Deirdre Royster
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520937376
Release Date: 2003-10-02
Genre: Political Science

From the time of Booker T. Washington to today, and William Julius Wilson, the advice dispensed to young black men has invariably been, "Get a trade." Deirdre Royster has put this folk wisdom to an empirical test—and, in Race and the Invisible Hand, exposes the subtleties and discrepancies of a workplace that favors the white job-seeker over the black. At the heart of this study is the question: Is there something about young black men that makes them less desirable as workers than their white peers? And if not, then why do black men trail white men in earnings and employment rates? Royster seeks an answer in the experiences of 25 black and 25 white men who graduated from the same vocational school and sought jobs in the same blue-collar labor market in the early 1990s. After seriously examining the educational performances, work ethics, and values of the black men for unique deficiencies, her study reveals the greatest difference between young black and white men—access to the kinds of contacts that really help in the job search and entry process.

The New Political Sociology of Science

Author: Scott Frickel
Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press
ISBN: 9780299213336
Release Date: 2006-03-01
Genre: Science

In the twenty-first century, the production and use of scientific knowledge is more regulated, commercialized, and participatory than at any other time. The stakes in understanding those changes are high for scientist and nonscientist alike: they challenge traditional ideas of intellectual work and property and have the potential to remake legal and professional boundaries and transform the practice of research. A critical examination of the structures of power and inequality these changes hinge upon, this book explores the implications for human health, democratic society, and the environment.

Not so nuclear Families

Author: Karen V. Hansen
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 0813535018
Release Date: 2005
Genre: FAMILY & RELATIONSHIPS

Annotation How do working parents provide care and mobilize the help that they need? Karen V. Hansen investigates the lives of working parents and the informal networks they construct to help care for their children. The book concludes with a series of policy suggestions intended to improve the environment in which working families raise children.

American Sociological Review

Author: Frank Hamilton Hankins
Publisher:
ISBN: UOM:39076002537566
Release Date: 2007
Genre: Sociology

Includes sections "Book reviews" and "Periodical literature."

Choosing Homes Choosing Schools

Author: Annette Lareau
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
ISBN: 9781610448208
Release Date: 2014-03-31
Genre: Social Science

A series of policy shifts over the past decade promises to change how Americans decide where to send their children to school. In theory, the boom in standardized test scores and charter schools will allow parents to evaluate their assigned neighborhood school, or move in search of a better option. But what kind of data do parents actually use while choosing schools? Are there differences among suburban and urban families? How do parents’ choices influence school and residential segregation in America? Choosing Homes, Choosing Schools presents a breakthrough analysis of the new era of school choice, and what it portends for American neighborhoods. The distinguished contributors to Choosing Homes, Choosing Schools investigate the complex relationship between education, neighborhood social networks, and larger patterns of inequality. Paul Jargowsky reviews recent trends in segregation by race and class. His analysis shows that segregation between blacks and whites has declined since 1970, but remains extremely high. Moreover, white families with children are less likely than childless whites to live in neighborhoods with more minority residents. In her chapter, Annette Lareau draws on interviews with parents in three suburban neighborhoods to analyze school-choice decisions. Surprisingly, she finds that middle- and upper-class parents do not rely on active research, such as school tours or test scores. Instead, most simply trust advice from friends and other people in their network. Their decision-making process was largely informal and passive. Eliot Weinginer complements this research when he draws from his data on urban parents. He finds that these families worry endlessly about the selection of a school, and that parents of all backgrounds actively consider alternatives, including charter schools. Middle- and upper-class parents relied more on federally mandated report cards, district websites, and online forums, while working-class parents use network contacts to gain information on school quality. Little previous research has explored what role school concerns play in the preferences of white and minority parents for particular neighborhoods. Featuring innovative work from more than a dozen scholars, Choosing Homes, Choosing Schools adroitly addresses this gap and provides a firmer understanding of how Americans choose where to live and send their children to school.