No Right to Be Idle

Author: Sarah F. Rose
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 9781469624907
Release Date: 2017-02-13
Genre: Political Science

During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Americans with all sorts of disabilities came to be labeled as "unproductive citizens." Before that, disabled people had contributed as they were able in homes, on farms, and in the wage labor market, reflecting the fact that Americans had long viewed productivity as a spectrum that varied by age, gender, and ability. But as Sarah F. Rose explains in No Right to Be Idle, a perfect storm of public policies, shifting family structures, and economic changes effectively barred workers with disabilities from mainstream workplaces and simultaneously cast disabled people as morally questionable dependents in need of permanent rehabilitation to achieve "self-care" and "self-support." By tracing the experiences of policymakers, employers, reformers, and disabled people caught up in this epochal transition, Rose masterfully integrates disability history and labor history. She shows how people with disabilities lost access to paid work and the status of "worker--a shift that relegated them and their families to poverty and second-class economic and social citizenship. This has vast consequences for debates about disability, work, poverty, and welfare in the century to come.

Inventing the Feeble Mind

Author: James Trent
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199396207
Release Date: 2016-11-01
Genre: Medical

Pity, disgust, fear, cure, and prevention--all are words that Americans have used to make sense of what today we call intellectual disability. Inventing the Feeble Mind explores the history of this disability from its several identifications over the past 200 years: idiocy, imbecility, feeblemindedness, mental defect, mental deficiency, mental retardation, and most recently intellectual disability. Using institutional records, private correspondence, personal memories, and rare photographs, James Trent argues that the economic vulnerability of intellectually disabled people (and often their families), more than the claims made for their intellectual and social limitations, has shaped meaning, services, and policies in United States history.

Law and the Borders of Belonging in the Long Nineteenth Century United States

Author: Barbara Young Welke
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521152259
Release Date: 2010-03-08
Genre: History

For more than a generation, historians and legal scholars have documented inequalities at the heart of American law and daily life and exposed inconsistencies in the generic category of "American citizenship." Welke draws on that wealth of historical, legal, and theoretical scholarship to offer a new paradigm of liberal selfhood and citizenship from the founding of the United States through the 1920s. Law and the Borders of Belonging questions understanding this period through a progressive narrative of expanding rights, revealing that it was characterized instead by a sustained commitment to borders of belonging of liberal selfhood, citizenship, and nation in which able white men's privilege depended on the subject status of disabled persons, racialized others, and women. Welke's conclusions pose challenging questions about the modern liberal democratic state that extend well beyond the temporal and geographic boundaries of the long nineteenth century United States.

White Women s Rights

Author: Louise Michele Newman
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780198028864
Release Date: 1999-02-04
Genre: Law

This study reinterprets a crucial period (1870s-1920s) in the history of women's rights, focusing attention on a core contradiction at the heart of early feminist theory. At a time when white elites were concerned with imperialist projects and civilizing missions, progressive white women developed an explicit racial ideology to promote their cause, defending patriarchy for "primitives" while calling for its elimination among the "civilized." By exploring how progressive white women at the turn of the century laid the intellectual groundwork for the feminist social movements that followed, Louise Michele Newman speaks directly to contemporary debates about the effect of race on current feminist scholarship. "White Women's Rights is an important book. It is a fascinating and informative account of the numerous and complex ties which bound feminist thought to the practices and ideas which shaped and gave meaning to America as a racialized society. A compelling read, it moves very gracefully between the general history of the feminist movement and the particular histories of individual women."--Hazel Carby, Yale University

The Civil Rights Movement in Tennessee

Author: Bobby L. Lovett
Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press
ISBN: 1572334436
Release Date: 2005
Genre: History

The civil rights movement in the state of Tennessee is examined in this history that proposes that African Americans have always had a civil rights movement in Tennessee, even during slavery.

The Fix

Author: Jonathan Tepperman
Publisher: Tim Duggan Books
ISBN: 9781101902998
Release Date: 2016-09-20
Genre: Political Science

We all know the bad news. Our economies are stagnant. Wages are flat and income inequality keeps rising. The Middle East is burning and extremism is spreading. Frightened voters are embracing populist outsiders and angry nationalists. And no wonder: we are living in an age of unprecedented, irreversible decline—or so we’re constantly being told. Jonathan Tepperman’s The Fix presents a very different picture. It identifies ten pervasive and seemingly impossible challenges—including immigration reform, economic stagnation, political gridlock, corruption, and Islamist extremism—and shows that, contrary to the general consensus, each has a solution, and not merely a hypothetical one. By taking a close look at overlooked success stories—from countries as diverse as Canada, Botswana, and Indonesia—Tepperman discovers practical advice for problem-solvers of all stripes, making a data-driven case for optimism in a time of crushing pessimism.

Unequal Freedom

Author: Evelyn Nakano GLENN
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674037642
Release Date: 2009-06-30
Genre: Social Science

The inequalities that persist in America have deep historical roots. Evelyn Nakano Glenn untangles this complex history in a unique comparative regional study from the end of Reconstruction to the eve of World War II. During this era the country experienced enormous social and economic changes with the abolition of slavery, rapid territorial expansion, and massive immigration, and struggled over the meaning of free labor and the essence of citizenship as people who previously had been excluded sought the promise of economic freedom and full political rights. After a lucid overview of the concepts of the free worker and the independent citizen at the national level, Glenn vividly details how race and gender issues framed the struggle over labor and citizenship rights at the local level between blacks and whites in the South, Mexicans and Anglos in the Southwest, and Asians and haoles (the white planter class) in Hawaii. She illuminates the complex interplay of local and national forces in American society and provides a dynamic view of how labor and citizenship were defined, enforced, and contested in a formative era for white-nonwhite relations in America.

Good Blood Bad Blood

Author: J. David Smith
Publisher: American Association
ISBN: 1937604039
Release Date: 2012
Genre: Medical

At the vortex of the American eugenics tragedy was the seemingly sordid tale of a "degenerate" family from rural New Jersey.Published in 1912, The Kallikak Family was a pseudoscientific treatise describing generations of illiterate, poor, and purportedly immoral Kallikak family members who were chronically unemployed, "feebleminded," criminal, and, in general, perceived asthreats to "racial hygiene." Psychologist Henry Herbert Goddard invented the pseudonym "Kallikak"-from the Greek words Kallos (beauty) and Kakos (bad)-to illustrate the eugenic belief in the role of nature and heredity as unalterable forces leading to degeneracy, and his tale of the contrasting fates of the disparate Kallikak ancestral lines reigned for decades as seemingly conclusive proof of the hereditary nature of intelligence, feeblemindedness, criminal behavior, and degeneracy. The starting point for Goddard's moral tale was "Deborah Kallikak," an inmate at his institution for the feebleminded. Incredibly, as revealed in detail for the first time in Good Blood, Bad Blood: Science, Nature, and the Myth of the Kallikaks, Goddard was completely wrong. No degenerate line descended from the purported Kallikak progenitor. There were only people-some of whom had resources and access to education, others of whom were poor, uneducated, and cast into the cauldron that was urban America at the dawn of the Industrial Age. The pseudonymous "Deborah Kallikak" became the poster child for societal fears regarding immigration, heredity, and racial integration, the flames of which were fanned by a select group of well-educated, upper class, American scientists marching under the banner of the new "science" of eugenics. In the 100 years since publication of The Kallikak Family, the woman Goddard called "Deborah" has remained in the shadows of history, known only by the name forced upon her. Using new source material, Good Blood, Bad Blood tells her story in its entirety-in dram

He Never Came Home

Author: Regina R. Robertson
Publisher: Agate Publishing
ISBN: 9781572847972
Release Date: 2017-06-13
Genre: Family & Relationships

He Never Came Home is a collection of 22 personal essays written by girls and women who have been separated from their fathers by way of divorce, abandonment, or death. The contributors to this collection come from a wide range of different backgrounds in terms of race, socioeconomic status, religion, and geographic location. Their essays offer deep insights into the emotions related to losing one’s father, including sadness, indifference, anger, acceptance—and everything in between. This book, edited by Essence magazine's West Coast editor Regina R. Robertson, is first and foremost an offering to young girls and women who have endured the loss of their fathers. But it also speaks to mothers who are raising girls without a father present, offering important perspective into their daughter's feelings and struggles. The essays in He Never Came Home are organized into three categories: "Divorce," "Distant," and "Deceased." With essays by contributors such as Emmy Award–winning actress Regina King, fitness expert and New York Times best-selling author Gabby Reece, and television comedy writer Jenny Lee, this anthology illustrates the journey of the fatherless, and provides a space for these writers to express their pain, hope, and healing—minus any judgments and without apology.

The Great Transformation

Author: Karl Polanyi
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 9780807056424
Release Date: 2001-03-28
Genre: Business & Economics

In this classic work of economic history and social theory, Karl Polanyi analyzes the economic and social changes brought about by the "great transformation" of the Industrial Revolution. His analysis explains not only the deficiencies of the self-regulating market, but the potentially dire social consequences of untempered market capitalism. New introductory material reveals the renewed importance of Polanyi's seminal analysis in an era of globalization and free trade.

Africans

Author: John Iliffe
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521484227
Release Date: 1995-08-25
Genre: History

This history of Africa from the origins of mankind to the South African general election of 1994 refocuses African history on the peopling of an environmentally hostile continent. The social, economic and political institutions of the African continent were designed to ensure survival and maximize numbers, but in the context of medical progress and other twentieth-century innovations these institutions have bred the most rapid population growth the world has ever seen. The history of the continent is thus a single story binding living Africans to the earliest human ancestors.

Recovery from Schizophrenia

Author: Richard Warner
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780415212670
Release Date: 2004-01
Genre: Psychology

Recovery from Schizophrenia, from its first publication, was acclaimed as a work of major importance. It demonstrated convincingly, but controversially, how political, economic and labour market forces shape social responses to the mentally ill, mould psychiatric treatment philosophy, and influence the onset and course of one of the most common forms of mental illness. In this revised and updated third edition, Dr Warner analyses the latest research to extend the conclusions of the original work and tells us whether conditions and outcomes for people with schizophrenia are getting better or worse for people in Britain and America in recent years. In addition, he * critiques recent approaches to preventing the occurrence of schizophrenia * suggests innovative strategies for advancing the economic situation of people with mental illness * describes the latest advances in the rehabilitation of people with schizophrenia * provides a guide on how to combat the stigma of mental illness at local and national level. Recovery from Schizophrenia's radical analysis of the factors affecting the outcome of schizophrenia is essential reading for all psychiatrists, mental health professional, mental health advocates, social workers, rehabilitation personnel, and psychologists.

Searing Indictment of Evil in Hitler s Germany

Author: Klaus Mann
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0140189181
Release Date: 1995
Genre: Fiction

A searing indictment of evil in Hitler's Germany. Hendrik Hofgen is a man obsessed with becoming a famous actor. When the Nazis come to power in Germany, he willingly renounces his Communist past and deserts his wife and mistress in order to keep on performing. His diabolical performance as Mephistopheles in Faust proves to be the stepping-stone he yearned for: attracting the attention of Hermann Göring, it wins Hofgen an appointment as head of the State Theatre. The rewards - the respect of the public, a castle - like villa, a uplace in Berlin's highest circles - are beyond his wildest dreams. But the moral consequences of his betrayals begin to haunt him, turning his dreamworld into a nightmare.