No Right to Be Idle

Author: Sarah F. Rose
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 9781469624907
Release Date: 2017-02-13
Genre: Political Science

During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Americans with all sorts of disabilities came to be labeled as "unproductive citizens." Before that, disabled people had contributed as they were able in homes, on farms, and in the wage labor market, reflecting the fact that Americans had long viewed productivity as a spectrum that varied by age, gender, and ability. But as Sarah F. Rose explains in No Right to Be Idle, a perfect storm of public policies, shifting family structures, and economic changes effectively barred workers with disabilities from mainstream workplaces and simultaneously cast disabled people as morally questionable dependents in need of permanent rehabilitation to achieve "self-care" and "self-support." By tracing the experiences of policymakers, employers, reformers, and disabled people caught up in this epochal transition, Rose masterfully integrates disability history and labor history. She shows how people with disabilities lost access to paid work and the status of "worker--a shift that relegated them and their families to poverty and second-class economic and social citizenship. This has vast consequences for debates about disability, work, poverty, and welfare in the century to come.

What We Have Done

Author: Fred Pelka
Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press
ISBN: 9781558499195
Release Date: 2012
Genre: History

"Nothing about us without us" has been a core principle of American disability rights activists for more than half a century. It represents a response by people with disabilities to being treated with scorn and abuse or as objects of pity, and to having the most fundamental decisions relating to their lives--where they would live; if and how they would be educated; if they would be allowed to marry or have families; indeed, if they would be permitted to live at all--made by those who were, in the parlance of the movement, "temporarily able-bodied." In What We Have Done: An Oral History of the Disability Rights Movement, Fred Pelka takes that slogan at face value. He presents the voices of disability rights activists who, in the period from 1950 to 1990, transformed how society views people with disabilities, and recounts how the various streams of the movement came together to push through the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the most sweeping civil rights legislation since passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Beginning with the stories of those who grew up with disabilities in the 1940s and '50s, the book traces how disability came to be seen as a political issue, and how people with disabilities--often isolated, institutionalized, and marginalized--forged a movement analogous to the civil rights, women's rights, and gay rights movements, and fought for full and equal participation in American society.

Inventing the Feeble Mind

Author: James W. Trent Jr.
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520917278
Release Date: 1994-03-16
Genre: Medical

James W. Trent uses public documents, private letters, investigative reports, and rare photographs to explore our changing perceptions of mental retardation over the past 150 years. He contends that the economic vulnerability of mentally retarded people (and their families), more than the claims made for their intellectual or social limitations, has determined their institutional treatment.

Law and the Borders of Belonging in the Long Nineteenth Century United States

Author: Barbara Young Welke
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521152259
Release Date: 2010-03-08
Genre: History

For more than a generation, historians and legal scholars have documented inequalities at the heart of American law and daily life and exposed inconsistencies in the generic category of "American citizenship." Welke draws on that wealth of historical, legal, and theoretical scholarship to offer a new paradigm of liberal selfhood and citizenship from the founding of the United States through the 1920s. Law and the Borders of Belonging questions understanding this period through a progressive narrative of expanding rights, revealing that it was characterized instead by a sustained commitment to borders of belonging of liberal selfhood, citizenship, and nation in which able white men's privilege depended on the subject status of disabled persons, racialized others, and women. Welke's conclusions pose challenging questions about the modern liberal democratic state that extend well beyond the temporal and geographic boundaries of the long nineteenth century United States.

Disability Histories

Author: Susan Burch
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252096693
Release Date: 2014-12-30
Genre: Social Science

The field of disability history continues to evolve rapidly. In this collection, Susan Burch and Michael Rembis present nineteen essays that integrate critical analysis of gender, race, historical context, and other factors to enrich and challenge the traditional modes of interpretation still dominating the field. As the first collection of its kind in over a decade, Disability Histories not only brings readers up to date on scholarship within the field but fosters the process of moving it beyond the U.S. and Western Europe by offering work on Africa, South America, and Asia. The result is a broad range of readings that open new vistas for investigation and study while encouraging scholars at all levels to redraw the boundaries that delineate who and what is considered of historical value. Informed and accessible, Disability Histories is essential for classrooms engaged in all facets of disability studies within and across disciplines. Contributors are Frances Bernstein, Daniel Blackie, Pamela Block, Elsbeth Bösl, Dea Boster, Susan K. Cahn, Alison Carey, Fatima Cavalcante, Jagdish Chander, Audra Jennings, John Kinder, Catherine Kudlick, Paul R. D. Lawrie, Herbert Muyinda, Kim E. Nielsen, Katherine Ott, Stephen Pemberton, Anne Quartararo, Amy Renton, and Penny Richards.

For All the Tea in China

Author: Sarah Rose
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101190019
Release Date: 2010-03-18
Genre: History

A dramatic historical narrative of the man who stole the secret of tea from China In 1848, the British East India Company, having lost its monopoly on the tea trade, engaged Robert Fortune, a Scottish gardener, botanist, and plant hunter, to make a clandestine trip into the interior of China—territory forbidden to foreigners—to steal the closely guarded secrets of tea horticulture and manufacturing. For All the Tea in China is the remarkable account of Fortune's journeys into China—a thrilling narrative that combines history, geography, botany, natural science, and old-fashioned adventure. Disguised in Mandarin robes, Fortune ventured deep into the country, confronting pirates, hostile climate, and his own untrustworthy men as he made his way to the epicenter of tea production, the remote Wu Yi Shan hills. One of the most daring acts of corporate espionage in history, Fortune's pursuit of China's ancient secret makes for a classic nineteenth-century adventure tale, one in which the fate of empires hinges on the feats of one extraordinary man.

Disabled Rights

Author: Jacqueline Vaughn Switzer
Publisher: Georgetown University Press
ISBN: 1589013107
Release Date: 2003-02-13
Genre: Political Science

"Freedom and Justice for all" is a phrase that can have a hollow ring for many members of the disability community in the United States. Jacqueline Vaughn Switzer gives us a comprehensive introduction to and overview of U.S. disability policy in all facets of society, including education, the workplace, and social integration. Disabled Rights provides an interdisciplinary approach to the history and politics of the disability rights movement and assesses the creation and implementation, successes and failures of the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) by federal, state and local governments. Disabled Rights explains how people with disabilities have been treated from a social, legal, and political perspective in the United States. With an objective and straightforward approach, Switzer identifies the programs and laws that have been enacted in the past fifty years and how they have affected the lives of people with disabilities. She raises questions about Congressional intent in passing the ADA, the evolution and fragmentation of the disability rights movement, and the current status of disabled people in the U.S. Illustrating the shift of disability issues from a medical focus to civil rights, the author clearly defines the contemporary role of persons with disabilities in American culture, and comprehensively outlines the public and private programs designed to integrate disabled persons into society. She covers the law's provisions as they apply to private organizations and businesses and concludes with the most up-to-date coverage of recent Supreme Court decisions-especially since the 2000-2002 terms-that have profoundly influenced the implementation of the ADA and other disability policies. For activists as well as scholars, students, and practitioners in public policy and public administration, Switzer has written a compassionate, yet powerful book that demands attention from everyone interested in the battle for disability rights and equality in the United States.

Good Blood Bad Blood

Author: J. David Smith
Publisher: American Association
ISBN: 1937604039
Release Date: 2012
Genre: Medical

At the vortex of the American eugenics tragedy was the seemingly sordid tale of a "degenerate" family from rural New Jersey.Published in 1912, The Kallikak Family was a pseudoscientific treatise describing generations of illiterate, poor, and purportedly immoral Kallikak family members who were chronically unemployed, "feebleminded," criminal, and, in general, perceived asthreats to "racial hygiene." Psychologist Henry Herbert Goddard invented the pseudonym "Kallikak"-from the Greek words Kallos (beauty) and Kakos (bad)-to illustrate the eugenic belief in the role of nature and heredity as unalterable forces leading to degeneracy, and his tale of the contrasting fates of the disparate Kallikak ancestral lines reigned for decades as seemingly conclusive proof of the hereditary nature of intelligence, feeblemindedness, criminal behavior, and degeneracy. The starting point for Goddard's moral tale was "Deborah Kallikak," an inmate at his institution for the feebleminded. Incredibly, as revealed in detail for the first time in Good Blood, Bad Blood: Science, Nature, and the Myth of the Kallikaks, Goddard was completely wrong. No degenerate line descended from the purported Kallikak progenitor. There were only people-some of whom had resources and access to education, others of whom were poor, uneducated, and cast into the cauldron that was urban America at the dawn of the Industrial Age. The pseudonymous "Deborah Kallikak" became the poster child for societal fears regarding immigration, heredity, and racial integration, the flames of which were fanned by a select group of well-educated, upper class, American scientists marching under the banner of the new "science" of eugenics. In the 100 years since publication of The Kallikak Family, the woman Goddard called "Deborah" has remained in the shadows of history, known only by the name forced upon her. Using new source material, Good Blood, Bad Blood tells her story in its entirety-in dram

Searing Indictment of Evil in Hitler s Germany

Author: Klaus Mann
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0140189181
Release Date: 1995
Genre: Fiction

A searing indictment of evil in Hitler's Germany. Hendrik Hofgen is a man obsessed with becoming a famous actor. When the Nazis come to power in Germany, he willingly renounces his Communist past and deserts his wife and mistress in order to keep on performing. His diabolical performance as Mephistopheles in Faust proves to be the stepping-stone he yearned for: attracting the attention of Hermann Göring, it wins Hofgen an appointment as head of the State Theatre. The rewards - the respect of the public, a castle - like villa, a uplace in Berlin's highest circles - are beyond his wildest dreams. But the moral consequences of his betrayals begin to haunt him, turning his dreamworld into a nightmare.

Africans

Author: John Iliffe
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521484227
Release Date: 1995-08-25
Genre: History

This history of Africa from the origins of mankind to the South African general election of 1994 refocuses African history on the peopling of an environmentally hostile continent. The social, economic and political institutions of the African continent were designed to ensure survival and maximize numbers, but in the context of medical progress and other twentieth-century innovations these institutions have bred the most rapid population growth the world has ever seen. The history of the continent is thus a single story binding living Africans to the earliest human ancestors.

Unequal Freedom

Author: Evelyn Nakano GLENN
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674037642
Release Date: 2009-06-30
Genre: Social Science

The inequalities that persist in America have deep historical roots. Evelyn Nakano Glenn untangles this complex history in a unique comparative regional study from the end of Reconstruction to the eve of World War II. During this era the country experienced enormous social and economic changes with the abolition of slavery, rapid territorial expansion, and massive immigration, and struggled over the meaning of free labor and the essence of citizenship as people who previously had been excluded sought the promise of economic freedom and full political rights. After a lucid overview of the concepts of the free worker and the independent citizen at the national level, Glenn vividly details how race and gender issues framed the struggle over labor and citizenship rights at the local level between blacks and whites in the South, Mexicans and Anglos in the Southwest, and Asians and haoles (the white planter class) in Hawaii. She illuminates the complex interplay of local and national forces in American society and provides a dynamic view of how labor and citizenship were defined, enforced, and contested in a formative era for white-nonwhite relations in America.

On Photography

Author: Susan Sontag
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 9781429957113
Release Date: 2011-04-01
Genre: Photography

Winner of the National Book Critics' Circle Award for Criticism. One of the most highly regarded books of its kind, On Photography first appeared in 1977 and is described by its author as "a progress of essays about the meaning and career of photographs." It begins with the famous "In Plato's Cave"essay, then offers five other prose meditations on this topic, and concludes with a fascinating and far-reaching "Brief Anthology of Quotations."

Mike Meyers CompTIA A Certification Passport Sixth Edition Exams 220 901 220 902

Author: Mike Meyers
Publisher: McGraw Hill Professional
ISBN: 9781259588921
Release Date: 2016-08-26
Genre: Computers

This trusted training and exam quick review guide has been fully revised to cover 100% of the latest CompTIA A+ exam objectives Thoroughly updated to cover 2015 exam objectives, Mike Meyers’ CompTIA A+ Certification Passport, Sixth Edition teaches the skills necessary to take the exams with complete confidence. You will get full details on hardware and OS technologies, including installation, configuration, diagnostics, and preventive maintenance. New topics include managing and maintaining mobile devices, including tablets; configuring operating systems, including Windows 8, Android, and iOS; and enhanced security and troubleshooting procedures. Written by certification guru Mike Meyers, this focused study guide offers a proven program for delivering the key information readers need to pass the exams. Additionally, this guide is an ideal entry point for almost any career in IT, highlighting technologies that you will use every day on the job. Staying true to the best-selling Passport series format, this volume uses “Itinerary,” “ETA,” “Warnings,” and “Checkpoints” sections to reinforce important facts. Includes a coupon for 10% off of the exam fee—a $37 value Presented in the easy-to-follow and engaging style Meyers has made famous Electronic content includes: Practice exams download for both exam 901 and 902 with hundreds of accurate practice exam questions More than an hour of online video training featuring Mike Meyers Online performance-based simulations that prepare you for the performance-based exam questions A link to Mike's favorite PC tools A PDF copy of the book

Brilliant Imperfection

Author: Eli Clare
Publisher:
ISBN: 0822362872
Release Date: 2017-02-03
Genre: Social Science

Drawing on memoir, history, and theory, Eli Clare complicates the understanding of cure, seeing it as an ideology that serves contradictory purposes from saving lives to social control while critiquing cure rhetoric and the drive to cure disabled people through an insistence of the value of disability."