Once Within Borders

Author: Charles S. Maier
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674973916
Release Date: 2016-10-17
Genre: History

At a time when the technologies of globalization are eroding barriers to communication, transportation, and trade, Charles Maier explores the fitful evolution of territories—politically bounded regions whose borders define the jurisdiction of laws and the movement of peoples—as a worldwide practice of human societies.

Once Within Borders

Author: Charles S. Maier
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674059786
Release Date: 2016-10-17
Genre: History

At a time when the technologies of globalization are eroding barriers to communication, transportation, and trade, Charles Maier explores the fitful evolution of territories—politically bounded regions whose borders define the jurisdiction of laws and the movement of peoples—as a worldwide practice of human societies.

The Cartographic State

Author: Jordan Branch
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781107040960
Release Date: 2013-11-28
Genre: History

Describes the emergence of the territorial state and examines the role that cartography has played in shaping its linear boundaries.

The Politics of Borders

Author: Matthew Longo
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781316774281
Release Date: 2017-12-07
Genre: Political Science

Borders sit at the center of global politics. Yet they are too often understood as thin lines, as they appear on maps, rather than as political institutions in their own right. This book takes a detailed look at the evolution of border security in the United States after 9/11. Far from the walls and fences that dominate the news, it reveals borders to be thick, multi-faceted and binational institutions that have evolved greatly in recent decades. The book contributes to debates within political science on sovereignty, citizenship, cosmopolitanism, human rights and global justice. In particular, the new politics of borders reveal a sovereignty that is not waning, but changing, expanding beyond the state carapace and engaging certain logics of empire.

Peace and War

Author: Kalevi Jaakko Holsti
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521399297
Release Date: 1991-04-26
Genre: Political Science

Professor Holsti examines the origins of war and the foundations of peace of the last 350 years.

How Population Change Will Transform Our World

Author: Sarah Harper
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780191086694
Release Date: 2016-07-21
Genre: Medical

Predicting the shape of our future populations is vital for installing the infrastructure, welfare, and provisions necessary for society to survive. There are many opportunities and challenges that will come with the changes in our populations over the 21st century. In this new addition to the 21st Century Challenges series, Sarah Harper works to dispel myths such as the fear of unstoppable global growth resulting in a population explosion, or that climate change will lead to the mass movement of environmental refugees; and instead considers the future shape of our populations in light of demographic trends in fertility, mortality, and migration, and their national and global impact. How Population Change Will Transform Our World looks at population trends by region to highlight the key issues facing us in the coming decades, including the demographic inertia in Europe, demographic dividend in Asia, high fertility and mortality in Africa, the youth bulge in the Middle East, and the balancing act of migration in the Americas. Harper concludes with an analysis of global challenges we must plan for such as the impact of climate change and urbanization, and the difficulty of feeding 10 billion people, and considers ways in which we can prepare for, and mitigate against, these challenges.

Does Conquest Pay

Author: Peter Liberman
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9780691002422
Release Date: 1998-08-23
Genre: Political Science

Can foreign invaders successfully exploit industrial economies? DOES CONQUEST PAY? demonstrates that expansion can, in fact, provide rewards to aggressor nations and suggests that the international system is more war-prone than many optimists claim.

A Political Theory of Territory

Author: Margaret Moore
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780190222246
Release Date: 2015
Genre: Philosophy

This title offers a political self-determination theory of territory. Territorial disputes are at the centre of some of the most intractable controversies facing us today but it is also one of the most under-theorised concepts that we rely on. Most work in political philosophy, international relations, political science, and law take for granted the territorial imperative (that we need states, and states are necessarily territorial); yet, this book argues, territory itself requires a defence.

A World in Disarray

Author: Richard Haass
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9780399562372
Release Date: 2017-01-10
Genre: Political Science

"A valuable primer on foreign policy: a primer that concerned citizens of all political persuasions—not to mention the president and his advisers—could benefit from reading." —The New York Times An examination of a world increasingly defined by disorder and a United States unable to shape the world in its image, from the president of the Council on Foreign Relations Things fall apart; the center cannot hold. The rules, policies, and institutions that have guided the world since World War II have largely run their course. Respect for sovereignty alone cannot uphold order in an age defined by global challenges from terrorism and the spread of nuclear weapons to climate change and cyberspace. Meanwhile, great power rivalry is returning. Weak states pose problems just as confounding as strong ones. The United States remains the world’s strongest country, but American foreign policy has at times made matters worse, both by what the U.S. has done and by what it has failed to do. The Middle East is in chaos, Asia is threatened by China’s rise and a reckless North Korea, and Europe, for decades the world’s most stable region, is now anything but. As Richard Haass explains, the election of Donald Trump and the unexpected vote for “Brexit” signals that many in modern democracies reject important aspects of globalization, including borders open to trade and immigrants. In A World in Disarray, Haass argues for an updated global operating system—call it world order 2.0—that reflects the reality that power is widely distributed and that borders count for less. One critical element of this adjustment will be adopting a new approach to sovereignty, one that embraces its obligations and responsibilities as well as its rights and protections. Haass also details how the U.S. should act towards China and Russia, as well as in Asia, Europe, and the Middle East. He suggests, too, what the country should do to address its dysfunctional politics, mounting debt, and the lack of agreement on the nature of its relationship with the world. A World in Disarray is a wise examination, one rich in history, of the current world, along with how we got here and what needs doing. Haass shows that the world cannot have stability or prosperity without the United States, but that the United States cannot be a force for global stability and prosperity without its politicians and citizens reaching a new understanding.

A Search for Sovereignty

Author: Lauren Benton
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781107782716
Release Date: 2009-11-30
Genre: History

A Search for Sovereignty approaches world history by examining the relation of law and geography in European empires between 1400 and 1900. Lauren Benton argues that Europeans imagined imperial space as networks of corridors and enclaves, and that they constructed sovereignty in ways that merged ideas about geography and law. Conflicts over treason, piracy, convict transportation, martial law, and crime created irregular spaces of law, while also attaching legal meanings to familiar geographic categories such as rivers, oceans, islands, and mountains. The resulting legal and spatial anomalies influenced debates about imperial constitutions and international law both in the colonies and at home. This study changes our understanding of empire and its legacies and opens new perspectives on the global history of law.

Why Walls Won t Work

Author: Michael Dear
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199323906
Release Date: 2013-01-16
Genre: Social Science

When thinking about the border separating the United States from Mexico, what typically comes to mind is an unwelcoming zone with violent, poverty-ridden towns, cities, and maquiladoras on one side and an increasingly militarized network of barriers and surveillance systems on the other. It was not always this way. In fact, from the end of Mexican-American War until the late twentieth century, the border was a very porous and loosely regulated region. In this sweeping account of life within the United States-Mexican border zone, acclaimed urbanist and geographer Michael Dear traces the border's long history of cultural interaction, from exchanges between the region's numerous Mesoamerican tribes onwards. Once Mexican and American settlers met at the Rio Grande and the southwest in the nineteenth century, new forms of interaction evolved. But as Dear warns in his bracing study, this vibrant zone of cultural and social amalgamation is in danger of fading away because of highly restrictive American policies and the violence along Mexico's side of the border. As he explains through analyses of the U.S. border security complex and the emerging Mexican narco-state, the very existence of the "third nation" occupied by both Americans and Mexicans is under serious threat. But through a series of evocative portraits of contemporary border communities, he shows that the potential for revitalizing this in-between nation still remains. Combining a broad historical perspective and a commanding overview of present-day problems, Why Walls Won't Work represents a major intellectual foray into one of the most hotly contested political issues of our era.

International Order in Diversity

Author: Andrew Phillips
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781107084834
Release Date: 2015-04-23
Genre: Political Science

This book explains how a diverse Indian Ocean international system arose and endured during Europe's crucial opening stages of imperial expansion.

The Land Between the Lakes

Author: Ronald A. Foresta
Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press
ISBN: 9781572338630
Release Date: 2013-10-30
Genre: History

"This is the first full-scale look at LBL, which has been managed by the TVA since its beginning. In part environmental history, this book focuses on public policy issues and the successes and failures of New Deal and then Great Society programs and concentrates fairly intensively on public planning"--

In Space We Read Time

Author: Karl Schlögel
Publisher: Bard Graduate Center Cultural
ISBN: 1941792081
Release Date: 2016-11-10
Genre: Art

History is usually thought of as a tale of time, a string of events flowing in a particular chronological order. But as Karl Schlögel shows in this groundbreaking book, the where of history is just as important as the when. Schlögel relishes space the way a writer relishes a good story: on a quest for a type of history that takes full account of place, he explores everything from landscapes to cities, maps to railway timetables. Do you know the origin of the name "Everest"? What can the layout of towns tell us about the American Dream? In Space We Read Time reveals this and much, much more. Here is both a model for thinking about history within physical space and a stimulating history of thought about space, as Schlögel reads historical periods and events within the context of their geographical location. Discussions range from the history of geography in France to what a town directory from 1930s Berlin can say about professional trades that have since disappeared. He takes a special interest in maps, which can serve many purposes--one poignant example being the German Jewish community's 1938 atlas of emigration, which showed the few remaining possibilities for escape. Other topics include Thomas Jefferson's map of the United States; the British survey of India; and the multiple cartographers with Woodrow Wilson at the Paris Peace Conference, where the aim was to redraw Europe's boundaries on the basis of ethnicity. Moving deftly from the Austro-Hungarian Empire to 9/11 and from Vermeer's paintings to the fall of the Berlin Wall, this intriguing book presents history from a completely new perspective.

Boundaries of the International

Author: Jennifer Pitts
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674980815
Release Date: 2018-03-16
Genre: History

It is commonly believed that international law originated in respectful relations among free and equal European states. But as Jennifer Pitts shows, international law was forged as much through Europeans' domineering relations with non-European states and empires, leaving a legacy visible in the unequal structures of today's international order.