Pax Romana

Author: Adrian Goldsworthy
Publisher: Hachette UK
ISBN: 9780297864295
Release Date: 2016-08-11
Genre: History

The Pax Romana is famous for having provided a remarkable period of peace and stability, rarely seen before or since. Yet the Romans were first and foremost conquerors, imperialists who took by force a vast empire stretching from the Euphrates in the east to the Atlantic coast in the west. Their peace meant Roman victory and was brought about by strength and dominance rather than co-existence with neighbours. The Romans were aggressive and ruthless, and during the creation of their empire millions died or were enslaved. But the Pax Romana was real, not merely the boast of emperors, and some of the regions in the Empire have never again lived for so many generations free from major wars. So what exactly was the Pax Romana and what did it mean for the people who found themselves brought under Roman rule? Acclaimed historian Adrian Goldsworthy tells the story of the creation of the Empire, revealing how and why the Romans came to control so much of the world and asking whether the favourable image of the Roman peace is a true one. He chronicles the many rebellions by the conquered, and describes why these broke out and why most failed. At the same time, he explains that hostility was only one reaction to the arrival of Rome, and from the start there was alliance, collaboration and even enthusiasm for joining the invaders, all of which increased as resistance movements faded away. A ground-breaking and comprehensive history of the Roman Peace, Pax Romana takes the reader on a journey from the bloody conquests of an aggressive Republic through the age of Caesar and Augustus to the golden age of peace and prosperity under diligent emperors like Marcus Aurelius, offering a balanced and nuanced reappraisal of life in the Roman Empire.

Pax Romana

Author: Adrian Goldsworthy
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300222265
Release Date: 2016-09-06
Genre: History

A groundbreaking and comprehensive history of the Roman Peace from one of the leading historians of the ancient world Best-selling author Adrian Goldsworthy turns his attention to the Pax Romana, the famous peace and prosperity brought by the Roman Empire at its height in the first and second centuries AD. Yet the Romans were conquerors, imperialists who took by force a vast empire stretching from the Euphrates to the Atlantic coast. Ruthless, Romans won peace not through coexistence but through dominance; millions died and were enslaved during the creation of their empire. Pax Romana examines how the Romans came to control so much of the world and asks whether traditionally favorable images of the Roman peace are true. Goldsworthy vividly recounts the rebellions of the conquered, examining why they broke out, why most failed, and how they became exceedingly rare. He reveals that hostility was just one reaction to the arrival of Rome and that from the outset, conquered peoples collaborated, formed alliances, and joined invaders, causing resistance movements to fade away.

Pax Romana

Author: Adrian Goldsworthy
Publisher: Weidenfeld & Nicolson
ISBN: 9780297864295
Release Date: 2016-08-11
Genre: History

The Pax Romana is famous for having provided a remarkable period of peace and stability, rarely seen before or since. Yet the Romans were first and foremost conquerors, imperialists who took by force a vast empire stretching from the Euphrates in the east to the Atlantic coast in the west. Their peace meant Roman victory and was brought about by strength and dominance rather than co-existence with neighbours. The Romans were aggressive and ruthless, and during the creation of their empire millions died or were enslaved. But the Pax Romana was real, not merely the boast of emperors, and some of the regions in the Empire have never again lived for so many generations free from major wars. So what exactly was the Pax Romana and what did it mean for the people who found themselves brought under Roman rule? Acclaimed historian Adrian Goldsworthy tells the story of the creation of the Empire, revealing how and why the Romans came to control so much of the world and asking whether the favourable image of the Roman peace is a true one. He chronicles the many rebellions by the conquered, and describes why these broke out and why most failed. At the same time, he explains that hostility was only one reaction to the arrival of Rome, and from the start there was alliance, collaboration and even enthusiasm for joining the invaders, all of which increased as resistance movements faded away. A ground-breaking and comprehensive history of the Roman Peace, Pax Romana takes the reader on a journey from the bloody conquests of an aggressive Republic through the age of Caesar and Augustus to the golden age of peace and prosperity under diligent emperors like Marcus Aurelius, offering a balanced and nuanced reappraisal of life in the Roman Empire.

Augustus

Author: Adrian Goldsworthy
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300178722
Release Date: 2014-08-26
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

Tells the story of the heir to the murdered Julius Caesar who, as Rome's first emperor, brought peace and stability to the empire and presided over a new system of government.

The Roman Barbarian Wars

Author: Ludwig Heinrich Dyck
Publisher: Pen and Sword
ISBN: 9781473877887
Release Date: 2015-11-30
Genre: History

The history of the 'barbarian' peoples of Europe is filled with dramatic wars and migrations along with charismatic and often farsighted leaders. Inevitably, their greatest challenge was their struggle with the renowned military might of Rome. Even when outnumbered and faced by better equipped and trained Roman legions, the barbarians could inflict devastating defeats upon Rome. Though sometimes fickle in battle, the barbarian warrior was capable of reckless bravery. The Romans themselves admired the size and strength of the barbarians, which, combined with a life of hardship and intertribal warfare, made them dangerous opponents This book, however, is as much about Rome as it is about its tribal foes. Ludwig Dyck begins with the foundation of the city of Rome and follows her growth into a martial empire, complete with its pageantry and glory, its genius, its brutality and its arrogance. All this is told in a fast-paced, accessible narrative style.

Empire of Honour

Author: J. E. Lendon
Publisher: Clarendon Press
ISBN: 0199247633
Release Date: 1997
Genre: Political Science

J. E. Lendon offers a new interpretation of how the Roman empire worked in the first four centuries AD. A despotism rooted in force and fear enjoyed widespread support among the ruling classes of the provinces on the basis of an aristocratic culture of honour shared by rulers and ruled. The competitive Roman and Greek aristocrats of the empire conceived of their relative standing in terms of public esteem or honour, and conceived of their cities - towards which they felt a warm patriotism- as entities locked in a parallel struggle for primacy in honour over rivals. Emperors and provincial governors exploited these rivalries to gain the indispensable co-operation of local magnates by granting honours to individuals and their cities. Since rulers strove for honour as well, their subjects manipulated them with honours in their turn. Honour - whose workings are also traced in the Roman army - served as a way of talking and thinking about Roman government: it was both a species ofpower, and a way - connived in by rulers and ruled - of concealing the terrible realities of imperial rule.

War and Society in the Roman World

Author: Dr John Rich
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781134919918
Release Date: 2002-09-11
Genre: History

This volume focuses on the changing relationship between warfare and the Roman citizen body, from the Republic, when war was at the heart of Roman life, through to the Principate, when it was confined to professional soldiers and expansion largely ceased, and finally on to the Late Empire and the Roman army's eventual failure.

Praetorian

Author: Guy de la Bédoyère
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300218954
Release Date: 2017
Genre: History

A riveting account of ancient Rome's imperial bodyguard, the select band of soldiers who wielded the power to make--or destroy--the emperors they served Founded by Augustus around 27 B.C., the elite Praetorian Guard was tasked with the protection of the emperor and his family. As the centuries unfolded, however, Praetorian soldiers served not only as protectors and enforcers but also as powerful political players. Fiercely loyal to some emperors, they vied with others and ruthlessly toppled those who displeased them, including Caligula, Nero, Pertinax, and many more. Guy de la B�doy�re provides a compelling first full narrative history of the Praetorians, whose dangerous ambitions ceased only when Constantine permanently disbanded them. de la B�doy�re introduces Praetorians of all echelons, from prefects and messengers to artillery experts and executioners. He explores the delicate position of emperors for whom prestige and guile were the only defenses against bodyguards hungry for power. Folding fascinating details into a broad assessment of the Praetorian era, the author sheds new light on the wielding of power in the greatest of the ancient world's empires.

How Rome Fell

Author: Adrian Keith Goldsworthy
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300155600
Release Date: 2009-05-01
Genre: History

The author discusses how the Roman Empire--an empire without a serious rival--rotted from within, its rulers and institutions putting short-term ambition and personal survival over the wider good of the state.

Ancient Rome

Author: Christopher S. Mackay
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521809185
Release Date: 2004
Genre: History

Traces the political and military history of Roman Republic and Empire, from the Italian Iron Age to the last emperor in 476 A.D., examining the link between political institutions and military campaigns, the rise of Christianity, the eventual downfall of the western empire, and other key topics.

Antony and Cleopatra

Author: Adrian Keith Goldsworthy
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300167009
Release Date: 2011
Genre: Egypt

In this dual biography of the two great lovers of antiquity, historian Adrian Goldsworthy goes beyond myth and romance to create a portrait of his subjects--who were first and foremost political animals.

The Triumph of Empire

Author: Michael Kulikowski
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674659612
Release Date: 2016-11-14
Genre: History

Michael Kulikowski takes readers into the political heart of imperial Rome, beginning with the reign of Hadrian, who visited the farthest reaches of his domain and created stable frontiers, to the decades after Constantine the Great, who overhauled the government, introduced a new state religion, and founded a second Rome.

Rome Spreads Her Wings

Author: Gareth Sampson
Publisher: Pen and Sword
ISBN: 9781473874534
Release Date: 2016-06-19
Genre: History

The two decades between the end of the First Punic War and the beginning of the Second represent a key period in the development of Rome’s imperial ambitions, both within Italy and beyond. Within Italy, Rome faced an invasion of Gauls from Northern Italy, which threatened the very existence of the Roman state. This war culminated at the Battle of Telamon and the final Roman victory against the Gauls of Italy, giving Rome control of the peninsula up to the Alps for the first time in her history. Beyond the shores of Italy, Rome acquired her first provinces, in the form of Sardinia and Corsica, established footholds in Sicily and Spain and crossed the Adriatic to establish a presence on the Greek mainland, bringing Rome into the orbit of the Hellenistic World. Yet this period is often treated as nothing more than an intermission between the two better known Punic Wars, with each Roman campaign being made seemingly in anticipation of a further conflict with Carthage. Such a view overlooks two key factors that emerge from these decades: firstly, that Rome faced a far graver threat in the form of the Gauls of Northern Italy than she had faced at the hands of the Carthaginians in the First Punic War; secondly, that the foundations for Rome’s overseas empire were laid in these very decades. This work seeks to redress the balance and view these wars in their own right, analyse how close Rome came to being defeated in Italy and asses the importance of these decades as a key period in the foundation of Rome’s future empire.

Rome s Revolution

Author: Richard Alston
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780190231613
Release Date: 2015-05-06
Genre: History

On March 15th, 44 BC a group of senators stabbed Julius Caesar, the dictator of Rome. By his death, they hoped to restore Rome's Republic. Instead, they unleashed a revolution. By December of that year, Rome was plunged into a violent civil war. Three men--Mark Antony, Lepidus, and Octavian--emerged as leaders of a revolutionary regime, which crushed all opposition. In time, Lepidus was removed, Antony and Cleopatra were dispatched, and Octavian stood alone as sole ruler of Rome. He became Augustus, Rome's first emperor, and by the time of his death in AD 14 the 500-year-old republic was but a distant memory and the birth of one of history's greatest empires was complete. Rome's Revolution provides a riveting narrative of this tumultuous period of change. Historian Richard Alston digs beneath the high politics of Cicero, Caesar, Antony, and Octavian to reveal the experience of the common Roman citizen and soldier. He portrays the revolution as the crisis of a brutally competitive society, both among the citizenry and among the ruling class whose legitimacy was under threat. Throughout, he sheds new light on the motivations that drove men to march on their capital city and slaughter their compatriots. He also shows the reasons behind and the immediate legacy of the awe inspiringly successful and ruthless reign of Emperor Augustus. An enthralling story of ancient warfare, social upheaval, and personal betrayal, Rome's Revolution offers an authoritative new account of an epoch which still haunts us today.

Roman Power

Author: William V. Harris
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781107152717
Release Date: 2016-07-14
Genre: History

This book explains the growth, durability and eventual shrinkage of Roman imperial power alongside the Roman state's internal power structures.