Personal Memoirs of a Residence of Thirty Years with the Indian Tribes on the American Frontiers

Author: Henry Rowe Schoolcraft
Publisher:
ISBN: STANFORD:36105010552987
Release Date: 1851
Genre: Indians of North America

This is the autobiographical account of an explorer, government administrator, and scholar whose researches into the language and customs of the Chippewa and other Native American peoples of the Great Lakes region are considered milestones in nineteenth-century ethnography. After a childhood in Hamilton, New York, Schoolcraft gained attention for the reports and journals he wrote on trips west to explore mineral deposits in Arkansas, Missouri, and the old Northwest. Later, he joined the Cass expedition to the Lake Superior region, where he served as an Indian agent in St. Mary (Sault Ste. Marie) from 1822 to 1836. During that time, he continued to make regular exploratory journeys. On one of these, in 1832, he located the Mississippi River's source at Lake Itasca, Minnesota. From 1836 to 1841, Schoolcraft served as Michigan's superintendent of Indian Affairs and helped to bring about a treaty with the Ojibwa (1836), who as a result relinquished their claims to most of northern Michigan. Schoolcraft's memoirs are noteworthy for their detailed geographic, geological, political, military, folkloric, historical, and ethnographic information. Married to a woman of Native American background, he was sympathetic to certain aspects of the Indian societies he encountered. Nevertheless, he saw the sweep of new settlers into Indian lands as inevitable, and accepted as necessary the removal of Native peoples beyond the advancing boundaries of the United States. Schoolcraft believed that soldiers, diplomats, federal officials, and missionaries could do their jobs more effectively if they learned native languages and understood Indian customs. These motives, along with his literary aspirations, gave rise to his explorations of Indian cultural life. He discusses Indian myths and legends at length and talks about how he transformed them into his own Algic Researches (1839), the work that inspired Longfellow's "Hiawatha." Schoolcraft also corresponded or visited with Washington Irving, Thomas Jefferson, Albert Gallatin, and many of the era's other leading intellectuals, and details his conversations with them.

Lines Drawn upon the Water

Author: Karl S. Hele
Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press
ISBN: 9781554580972
Release Date: 2008-09-30
Genre: History

The First Nations who have lived in the Great Lakes watershed have been strongly influenced by the imposition of colonial and national boundaries there. The essays in Lines Drawn upon the Water examine the impact of the Canadian—American border on communities, with reference to national efforts to enforce the boundary and the determination of local groups to pursue their interests and define themselves. Although both governments regard the border as clearly defined, local communities continue to contest the artificial divisions imposed by the international boundary and define spatial and human relationships in the borderlands in their own terms. The debate is often cast in terms of Canada’s failure to recognize the 1794 Jay Treaty’s confirmation of Native rights to transport goods into Canada, but ultimately the issue concerns the larger struggle of First Nations to force recognition of their people’s rights to move freely across the border in search of economic and social independence.

Jacksonian and Antebellum Age

Author: Mark Renfred Cheathem
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 9781598840179
Release Date: 2008-01
Genre: History

This volume in the Perspectives in American Social History series highlights the extraordinary contributions of ordinary men, women, and children in the transformation of the country in the time of Andrew Jackson. * Contributions from highly accomplished social historians focusing on the Jacksonian and Antebellum periods * A selection of primary source documents including excerpts from David Walker's Appeal, Cherokee Nation v. Georgia, and the personal correspondence of Andrew Jackson

Indian Country

Author: Gail Guthrie Valaskakis
Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press
ISBN: 9781554588107
Release Date: 2009-08-03
Genre: Social Science

Since first contact, Natives and newcomers have been involved in an increasingly complex struggle over power and identity. Modern “Indian wars” are fought over land and treaty rights, artistic appropriation, and academic analysis, while Native communities struggle among themselves over membership, money, and cultural meaning. In cultural and political arenas across North America, Natives enact and newcomers protest issues of traditionalism, sovereignty, and self-determination. In these struggles over domination and resistance, over different ideologies and Indian identities, neither Natives nor other North Americans recognize the significance of being rooted together in history and culture, or how representations of “Indianness” set them in opposition to each other. In Indian Country: Essays on Contemporary Native Culture, Gail Guthrie Valaskakis uses a cultural studies approach to offer a unique perspective on Native political struggle and cultural conflict in both Canada and the United States. She reflects on treaty rights and traditionalism, media warriors, Indian princesses, powwow, museums, art, and nationhood. According to Valaskakis, Native and non-Native people construct both who they are and their relations with each other in narratives that circulate through art, anthropological method, cultural appropriation, and Native reappropriation. For Native peoples and Others, untangling the past—personal, political, and cultural—can help to make sense of current struggles over power and identity that define the Native experience today. Grounded in theory and threaded with Native voices and evocative descriptions of “Indian” experience (including the author’s), the essays interweave historical and political process, personal narrative, and cultural critique. This book is an important contribution to Native studies that will appeal to anyone interested in First Nations’ experience and popular culture.

Writing Indian Nations

Author: Maureen Konkle
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807875902
Release Date: 2005-11-16
Genre: Social Science

In the early years of the republic, the United States government negotiated with Indian nations because it could not afford protracted wars politically, militarily, or economically. Maureen Konkle argues that by depending on treaties, which rest on the equal standing of all signatories, Europeans in North America institutionalized a paradox: the very documents through which they sought to dispossess Native peoples in fact conceded Native autonomy. As the United States used coerced treaties to remove Native peoples from their lands, a group of Cherokee, Pequot, Ojibwe, Tuscarora, and Seneca writers spoke out. With history, polemic, and personal narrative these writers countered widespread misrepresentations about Native peoples' supposedly primitive nature, their inherent inability to form governments, and their impending disappearance. Furthermore, they contended that arguments about racial difference merely justified oppression and dispossession; deriding these arguments as willful attempts to evade the true meanings and implications of the treaties, the writers insisted on recognition of Native peoples' political autonomy and human equality. Konkle demonstrates that these struggles over the meaning of U.S.-Native treaties in the early nineteenth century led to the emergence of the first substantial body of Native writing in English and, as she shows, the effects of the struggle over the political status of Native peoples remain embedded in contemporary scholarship.

Robidoux Chronicles

Author: Hugh M. Lewis
Publisher: Trafford Publishing
ISBN: 9781412222990
Release Date: 2004-10-25
Genre: History

Robidoux Chronicles treats with comprehensive documentary detail the factual history of the Robidoux lineage in North America from the first progenitor who arrived in Quebec in about 1665, through the famous six brothers who distinguished themselves as Mountain Men, up until even recent times on reservations in the US. Many members of the Robidoux family were intimately connected to the entire history of the North American fur trade. The six brothers, born in St. Louis before the coming of Lewis & Clark, were important fur-traders during the classical Rendezvous era of the North American fur trade. They became key players in the organization & articulation of the Overland Trail, only to die soon afterward in relative obscurity upon the plains of Kansas & Nebraska. By the 1950's, the story of the Robidoux had been almost entirely forgotten. Subsequent historians had lost all but a scant & fragmentary knowledge of the true role & exploits of the Robidoux & their French-Indian compatriots upon the frontiers of the old west. Antoine Robidoux was the first to establish permanent trading settlements west of the Rockies in the Inter-Montane corridor, & his brother Michel was one of the first expeditions to traverse the length of the Grand Canyon. The eldest brother Joseph became one of the earliest established traders on the upper Missouri & founded St. Joseph, Missouri, which was later to be the primary starting point of the Overland Trail. His younger brother Louis became one of the earliest ranch owners in California, becoming Don of the Jurupa, that encompassed the areas known today as Riverside, San Bernardino, San Jacinto & San Timoteo. An entire inter-tribal French-Indian ethnocultural orientation had developed upon the plains, prairies & mountains of the Trans-Mississippi west a good fifty years before the coming of the Iron Horse & the Pony Express, & has been carried on today in proximity to the reservations of Kansas & Oklahoma, South Dakota & Wyoming.

Dictionary of Indian Tribes of the Americas

Author: Jan Onofrio
Publisher: American Indian Publishers, Inc.
ISBN: 9780937862285
Release Date: 1995-01-01
Genre: History

DICTIONARY OF INDIAN TRIBES OF THE AMERICAS - Second Edition contains information on over 1,150 tribal nations of the entire western hemisphere, from the Aleuts of the Arctic region to Onas in southern Argentina and Chile. This is a contemporary work and its intention is to bring modern day insights to the consideration of the native peoples who populate the western hemisphere. Every effort has been made to include tribes that have not been extensively covered in other publications. Modern anthropologists and historians tend to agree that there is a basic homogeneity (cultural, social, biological, or other similarities within a group) among the native peoples of the Americas that need to be considered when any of the tribes are studied. The tribal entries were written by noted local, national and international historians and anthropologists.

The Enchanted Moccasins and Other Native American Legends

Author: Henry R. Schoolcraft
Publisher: Courier Corporation
ISBN: 9780486121734
Release Date: 2012-03-15
Genre: Juvenile Fiction

Artfully woven by master storytellers and told to generations of Native American children around glowing lodge fires, here are 19 enchanting tales rife with legend, myth, and fairy tale magic.

Diary of Anna Green Winslow

Author: Anna Green Winslow
Publisher: Boston and New York : Houghton, Mifflin
ISBN: STANFORD:36105048648203
Release Date: 1894
Genre: Boston (Mass.)


The Captured

Author: Scott Zesch
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 1429910119
Release Date: 2007-04-01
Genre: History

On New Year's Day in 1870, ten-year-old Adolph Korn was kidnapped by an Apache raiding party. Traded to Comaches, he thrived in the rough, nomadic existence, quickly becoming one of the tribe's fiercest warriors. Forcibly returned to his parents after three years, Korn never adjusted to life in white society. He spent his last years in a cave, all but forgotten by his family. That is, until Scott Zesch stumbled over his own great-great-great uncle's grave. Determined to understand how such a "good boy" could have become Indianized so completely, Zesch travels across the west, digging through archives, speaking with Comanche elders, and tracking eight other child captives from the region with hauntingly similar experiences. With a historians rigor and a novelists eye, Zesch's The Captured paints a vivid portrait of life on the Texas frontier, offering a rare account of captivity. "A carefully written, well-researched contribution to Western history -- and to a promising new genre: the anthropology of the stolen." - Kirkus Reviews

The Light in the Forest

Author: Conrad Richter
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 9780804151016
Release Date: 2013-08-07
Genre: Juvenile Fiction

An adventurous story of a frontier boy raised by Indians, The Light in the Forest is a beloved American classic. When John Cameron Butler was a child, he was captured in a raid on the Pennsylvania frontier and adopted by the great warrrior Cuyloga. Renamed True Son, he came to think of himself as fully Indian. But eleven years later his tribe, the Lenni Lenape, has signed a treaty with the white men and agreed to return their captives, including fifteen-year-old True Son. Now he must go back to the family he has forgotten, whose language is no longer his, and whose ways of dress and behavior are as strange to him as the ways of the forest are to them. From the Paperback edition.

The First Frontier

Author: Scott Weidensaul
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 9780547539560
Release Date: 2012-02-08
Genre: History

Frontier: the word carries the inevitable scent of the West. But before Custer or Lewis and Clark, before the first Conestoga wagons rumbled across the Plains, it was the East that marked the frontier—the boundary between complex Native cultures and the first colonizing Europeans. Here is the older, wilder, darker history of a time when the land between the Atlantic and the Appalachians was contested ground—when radically different societies adopted and adapted the ways of the other, while struggling for control of what all considered to be their land. The First Frontier traces two and a half centuries of history through poignant, mostly unheralded personal stories—like that of a Harvard-educated Indian caught up in seventeenth-century civil warfare, a mixed-blood interpreter trying to straddle his white and Native heritage, and a Puritan woman wielding a scalping knife whose bloody deeds still resonate uneasily today. It is the first book in years to paint a sweeping picture of the Eastern frontier, combining vivid storytelling with the latest research to bring to life modern America’s tumultuous, uncertain beginnings.

Memoirs of a White Crow Indian Expanded Annotated

Author: Thomas H. Leforge
Publisher: BIG BYTE BOOKS
ISBN:
Release Date: 2016-01-20
Genre: Social Science

Tom Leforge was a legend in his time. Interpreter and scout, he lived among the Crow Indians, as a Crow, for decades. If not for a broken collar bone, Leforge would have been with the six Crow scouts that accompanied General George Armstrong Custer to the Little Bighorn. Instead, he watched from a hospital wagon as the troops marched off to their destiny. Days later, he interpreted Crow scout Curly's account of the battle for Lt. James Bradley. This is one of the most important memoirs of early Montana and the Indian Wars. Compiled by Leforge's friend, Dr. Thomas Marquis, this is a modest, self-deprecating, and often humorous account of a white man who was fully accepted into Indian life. Leforge's observations on Crow culture and the vanishing way of life that he was a part of is fascinating and detailed. Though he left the tribe for two decades to live among whites, he returned to the Crow reservation in his later years as the place where he felt most comfortable. Every memoir of the American West provides us with another view of a time that changed the country forever. For the first time, this long out-of-print volume is available as an affordable, well-formatted book for e-readers and smartphones. Be sure to LOOK INSIDE by clicking the cover above or download a sample.