Race Incarceration and American Values

Author: Glenn C. Loury
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 9780262260947
Release Date: 2008-08-22
Genre: Political Science

The United States, home to five percent of the world's population, now houses twenty-five percent of the world's prison inmates. Our incarceration rate -- at 714 per 100,000 residents and rising -- is almost forty percent greater than our nearest competitors (the Bahamas, Belarus, and Russia). More pointedly, it is 6.2 times the Canadian rate and 12.3 times the rate in Japan. Economist Glenn Loury argues that this extraordinary mass incarceration is not a response to rising crime rates or a proud success of social policy. Instead, it is the product of a generation-old collective decision to become a more punitive society. He connects this policy to our history of racial oppression, showing that the punitive turn in American politics and culture emerged in the post-civil rights years and has today become the main vehicle for the reproduction of racial hierarchies. Whatever the explanation, Loury argues, the uncontroversial fact is that changes in our criminal justice system since the 1970s have created a nether class of Americans -- vastly disproportionately black and brown -- with severely restricted rights and life chances. Moreover, conservatives and liberals agree that the growth in our prison population has long passed the point of diminishing returns. Stigmatizing and confining of a large segment of our population should be unacceptable to Americans. Loury's call to action makes all of us now responsible for ensuring that the policy changes.

Race Incarceration and American Values

Author: Glenn C. Loury
Publisher: Mit Press
ISBN: 0262123118
Release Date: 2008
Genre: Political Science

Why stigmatizing and confining a large segment of our population should be unacceptable to all Americans.

Race Incarceration and American Values

Author: Glenn C. Loury
Publisher: MIT Press (MA)
ISBN: 026227857X
Release Date: 2008
Genre: Law

Why stigmatizing and confining a large segment of our population should be unacceptable to all Americans.

The Anatomy of Racial Inequality

Author: Glenn C. LOURY
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674040328
Release Date: 2009-06-30
Genre: Social Science

Speaking wisely and provocatively about the political economy of race, Glenn Loury has become one of our most prominent black intellectuals--and, because of his challenges to the orthodoxies of both left and right, one of the most controversial. A major statement of a position developed over the past decade, this book both epitomizes and explains Loury's understanding of the depressed conditions of so much of black society today--and the origins, consequences, and implications for the future of these conditions. Using an economist's approach, Loury describes a vicious cycle of tainted social information that has resulted in a self-replicating pattern of racial stereotypes that rationalize and sustain discrimination. His analysis shows how the restrictions placed on black development by stereotypical and stigmatizing racial thinking deny a whole segment of the population the possibility of self-actualization that American society reveres--something that many contend would be undermined by remedies such as affirmative action. On the contrary, this book persuasively argues that the promise of fairness and individual freedom and dignity will remain unfulfilled without some forms of intervention based on race. Brilliant in its account of how racial classifications are created and perpetuated, and how they resonate through the social, psychological, spiritual, and economic life of the nation, this compelling and passionate book gives us a new way of seeing--and, perhaps, seeing beyond--the damning categorization of race in America.

One by One from the Inside Out

Author: Glenn C. Loury
Publisher:
ISBN: UOM:39015033264840
Release Date: 1995
Genre: Social Science

Argues against racial political practices that promote "correctness" rather than directly addressing racial problems, encouraging consideration based upon actual merit

Winning the Race

Author: John McWhorter
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781101216774
Release Date: 2005-12-29
Genre: Social Science

In his first major book on the state of black America since the New York Times bestseller Losing the Race, John McWhorter argues that a renewed commitment to achievement and integration is the only cure for the crisis in the African-American community. Winning the Race examines the roots of the serious problems facing black Americans today—poverty, drugs, and high incarceration rates—and contends that none of the commonly accepted reasons can explain the decline of black communities since the end of segregation in the 1960s. Instead, McWhorter posits that a sense of victimhood and alienation that came to the fore during the civil rights era has persisted to the present day in black culture, even though most blacks today have never experienced the racism of the segregation era. McWhorter traces the effects of this disempowering conception of black identity, from the validation of living permanently on welfare to gansta rap’s glorification of irresponsibility and violence as a means of “protest.” He discusses particularly specious claims of racism, attacks the destructive posturing of black leaders and the “hip-hop academics,” and laments that a successful black person must be faced with charges of “acting white.” While acknowledging that racism still exists in America today, McWhorter argues that both blacks and whites must move past blaming racism for every challenge blacks face, and outlines the steps necessary for improving the future of black America.

Democracy in Black

Author: Eddie S. Glaude (Jr.)
Publisher: Crown
ISBN: 9780804137416
Release Date: 2016
Genre: History

"A polemic on the state of black America that argues that we don't yet live in a post-racial society"--

Carceral Capitalism

Author: Jackie Wang
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 9781635900026
Release Date: 2018-02-16
Genre: Political Science

What we see happening in Ferguson and other cities around the country is not the creation of livable spaces, but the creation of living hells. When people are trapped in a cycle of debt it also can affect their subjectivity and how they temporally inhabit the world by making it difficult for them to imagine and plan for the future. What psychic toll does this have on residents? How does it feel to be routinely dehumanized and exploited by the police? -- from Carceral Capitalism In this collection of essays in Semiotext(e)'s Intervention series, Jackie Wang examines the contemporary incarceration techniques that have emerged since the 1990s. The essays illustrate various aspects of the carceral continuum, including the biopolitics of juvenile delinquency, predatory policing, the political economy of fees and fines, cybernetic governance, and algorithmic policing. Included in this volume is Wang's influential critique of liberal anti-racist politics, "Against Innocence," as well as essays on RoboCop, techno-policing, and the aesthetic problem of making invisible forms of power legible. Wang shows that the new racial capitalism begins with parasitic governance and predatory lending that extends credit only to dispossess later. Predatory lending has a decidedly spatial character and exists in many forms, including subprime mortgage loans, student loans for sham for-profit colleges, car loans, rent-to-own scams, payday loans, and bail bond loans. Parasitic governance, Wang argues, operates through five primary techniques: financial states of exception, automation, extraction and looting, confinement, and gratuitous violence. While these techniques of governance often involve physical confinement and the state-sanctioned execution of black Americans, new carceral modes have blurred the distinction between the inside and outside of prison. As technologies of control are perfected, carcerality tends to bleed into society.

What Death Can Touch

Author: Glenn Loury
Publisher:
ISBN: 1973469650
Release Date: 2017-12-05
Genre:

The next collection of short stories from amateur author Glenn Loury II. The stories contained within touch on his favorite themes: love, death, the ending and beginning of worlds, and of course that old fraudster God. Come take a gander at his thoughts on the most precious of things--those which death can touch.

When the Prisoners Ran Walpole

Author: Jamie Bissonette
Publisher:
ISBN: 0896087700
Release Date: 2008
Genre: History

This true story of an inmate-run prison proves prisons can be reformed, or better--abolished.

African American Core Values

Author: Richard Rosenfield
Publisher: iUniverse
ISBN: 9780595486359
Release Date: 2009-09
Genre: Philosophy

A "Best Hits" compilation of self-help quotations from famous to ordinary African Americans, from establishment insiders to athletes and rap artists, from the revered elders to twelve-year-old Myesha A treasure trove of wisdom that can help all young people avoid problems in life and make the most of opportunities A realistic, inspiring view of African Americans advancing-an antidote to the negative media portrayals A telling of centuries of American history in the poignant voices of people who lived and shaped that history

The New Jim Crow

Author: Michelle Alexander
Publisher: The New Press
ISBN: 9781595586438
Release Date: 2012
Genre: Social Science

Argues that the War on Drugs and policies that deny convicted felons equal access to employment, housing, education and public benefits create a permanent under-caste based largely on race. Reprint. 12,500 first printing.

American Gulag

Author: Mark Dow
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520246690
Release Date: 2005-10-03
Genre: Law

Exposes the harsh conditions that exist within the cruel system of immigration detention, bringing to light realities such as illegal beatings and inhumane conditions inside the secret and repressive prisons run by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Services.

Black Silent Majority

Author: Michael Javen Fortner
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674743991
Release Date: 2015-09-07
Genre: History

Aggressive policing and draconian sentencing have disproportionately imprisoned millions of African Americans for drug-related offenses. Michael Javen Fortner shows that in the 1970s these punitive policies toward addicts and pushers enjoyed the support of many working-class and middle-class blacks, angry about the chaos in their own neighborhoods.

Race Law and American Society

Author: Gloria J. Browne-Marshall
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781135087944
Release Date: 2013-05-02
Genre: Law

This second edition of Gloria Browne-Marshall’s seminal work , tracing the history of racial discrimination in American law from colonial times to the present, is now available with major revisions. Throughout, she advocates for freedom and equality at the center, moving from their struggle for physical freedom in the slavery era to more recent battles for equal rights and economic equality. From the colonial period to the present, this book examines education, property ownership, voting rights, criminal justice, and the military as well as internationalism and civil liberties by analyzing the key court cases that established America’s racial system and demonstrating the impact of these court cases on American society. This edition also includes more on Asians, Native Americans, and Latinos. Race, Law, and American Society is highly accessible and thorough in its depiction of the role race has played, with the sanction of the U.S. Supreme Court, in shaping virtually every major American social institution.