The Wiley Blackwell Companion to Human Geography

Author: John A. Agnew
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9781119250432
Release Date: 2016-08-08
Genre: Science

This volume provides an up-to-date, authoritative synthesis of the discipline of human geography. Unparalleled in scope, the companion offers an indispensable overview to the field, representing both historical and contemporary perspectives. Edited and written by the world's leading authorities in the discipline Divided into three major sections: Foundations (the history of human geography from Ancient Greece to the late nineteenth century); The Classics (the roots of modern human geography); Contemporary Approaches (current issues and themes in human geography) Each contemporary issue is examined by two contributors offering distinctive perspectives on the same theme

The Betweenness of Place

Author: J. Nicholas Entrikin
Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education
ISBN: 9781349210862
Release Date: 1990-11-02
Genre: Geography

In this original and important new book, Professor Entrikin argues that there is no essence or universal structure of place waiting to be uncovered or discovered by the theorist. The significance of place is associated with our 'situatedness' as human agents and is always best understood from a point of view and best represented in terms of narrative which can appreciate its specificity without reducing its richness as context to its more limited sense as location.

The SAGE Handbook of Human Geography 2v

Author: Roger Lee
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 9781446265994
Release Date: 2014-02-22
Genre: Social Science

"Superb! How refreshing to see a Handbook that eschews convention and explores the richness and diversity of the geographical imagination in such stimulating and challenging ways." - Peter Dicken, University of Manchester "Stands out as an innovative and exciting contribution that exceeds the genre." - Sallie A. Marston, University of Arizona "Captures wonderfully the richness and complexity of the worlds that human beings inhabit... This is a stand-out among handbooks!" - Lily Kong, National University of Singapore "This wonderfully unconventional book demonstrates human geography’s character and significance not by marching through traditional themes, but by presenting a set of geographical essays on basic ideas, practices, and concerns." - Alexander B. Murphy, University of Oregon "This SAGE Handbook stands out for its capacity to provoke the reader to think anew about human geography ... essays that offer some profoundly original insights into what it means to engage geographically with the world." - Eric Sheppard, UCLA Published in association with the journal Progress in Human Geography, edited and written by the principal scholars in the discipline, this Handbook demonstrates the difference that thinking about the world geographically makes. Each section considers how human geography shapes the world, interrogates it, and intervenes in it. It includes a major retrospective and prospective introductory essay, with three substantive sections on: Imagining Human Geographies Practising Human Geographies Living Human Geographies The Handbook also has an innovative multimedia component of conversations about key issues in human geography – as well as an overview of human geography from the Editors. A key reference for any scholar interested in questions about what difference it makes to think spatially or geographically about the world, this Handbook is a rich and textured statement about the geographical imagination.

The Scientific Nature of Geomorphology

Author: Bruce L. Rhoads
Publisher: Bruce Rhoads
ISBN:
Release Date: 1996
Genre: Science

Geomorphology is a discipline which has traditionally been dominated by fieldwork. This volume is devoted to the philosophical and methodological components of the discipline. Its purpose is to provide a comprehensive examination of contemporary perspectives on the scientific nature of geomorphology. The book should help unify and strengthen the disciplines by clarifying how geomorphology fits into the realm of the sciences, by examining its relationship to other sciences, by providing an improved understanding of methodological diversity in the discipline, and by identifying potential bases for disciplinary unity.

Geo Info Systems

Author: ProQuest Information and Learning Company
Publisher:
ISBN: CORNELL:31924063033876
Release Date: 1995
Genre: Geographic information systems


All Possible Worlds

Author: Geoffrey J. Martin
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 0195168704
Release Date: 2005
Genre: Science

Includes information on man as agent of change, maps and globes, voyages of discovery, World War I, World War II, etc.

Cultural Turns geographical Turns

Author: Ian Cook
Publisher:
ISBN: UOM:39015048829058
Release Date: 2000
Genre: Social Science

Introduces undergraduates to the key debates regarding space and culture and the key theoretical arguments which guide cultural geographical work. This book addresses the impact, significance, and characteristics of the 'cultural turn' in contemporary geography. It focuses on the development of the cultural geography subdiscipline and on what has made it a peculiar and unique realm of study. It demonstrates the importance of culture in the development of debates in other subdisciplines within geography and beyond. In line with these previous themes, the significance of space in the production of cultural values and expressions is also developed. Along with its timely examination of the health of the cultural geographical subdiscipline, this book is to be valued for its analysis of the impact of cultural theory on studies elsewhere in geography and of ideas of space and spatiality elsewhere in the social sciences.

American Geography and Geographers

Author: Geoffrey J. Martin
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195336023
Release Date: 2015-02-01
Genre: Science

The rise of American geography as a distinctive science in the United States straddles the 19th and 20th centuries, extending from the post-Civil war period to 1970. American Geography and Geographers: Toward Geographic Science is the first book to thoroughly and richly explicate this history. Its author, Geoffrey J. Martin, the foremost historian on the subject and official archivist of the Association of American Geographers, amassed a wealth of primary sources from archives worldwide, which enable him to chart the evolution of American geography with unprecedented detail and context. From the initial influence of the German school to the emergence of Geography as a unique discipline in American universities and thereafter, Martin clarifies the what, how and when of each advancement. Expansive discussion of the arguments made, controversies ignited and research voyages move hand in hand with the principals who originated and animated them: Davis, Jefferson, Huntington, Bowman, Johnson, Sauer, Hartshorne, and many more. From their grasp of local, regional, global and cultural phenomena, geographers also played pivotal roles in world historical events, including the two world wars and their treaties, as the US became the dominant global power. American Geography and Geographers: Toward Geographical Science is a conclusive study of the birth and maturation of the science. It will be of interest to geographers, teachers and students of geography, and all those compelled by the story of American Geography and those who founded and developed it.

How it Came to be

Author: William W. Speth
Publisher:
ISBN: UOM:39015060859496
Release Date: 1999
Genre: Human geography