Reinventing the Wheel

Author: Bronwen Percival
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520964464
Release Date: 2017-09-05
Genre: Cooking

In little more than a century, industrial practices have altered every aspect of the cheesemaking process, from the bodies of the animals that provide the milk to the microbial strains that ferment it. Reinventing the Wheel explores what has been lost as raw-milk, single-farm cheeses have given way to the juggernaut of factory production. In the process, distinctiveness and healthy rural landscapes have been exchanged for higher yields and monoculture. However, Bronwen and Francis Percival find reason for optimism. Around the world—not just in France, but also in the United States, England, and Australia—enterprising cheesemakers are exploring the techniques of their great-grandparents. At the same time, using sophisticated molecular methods, scientists are upending conventional wisdom about the role of microbes in every part of the world. Their research reveals the resilience and complexity of the indigenous microbial communities that contribute to the flavor and safety of cheese. One experiment at a time, these dynamic scientists, cheesemakers, and dairy farmers are reinventing the wheel.

Cheese and Microbes

Author: Catherine W. Donnelly
Publisher: ASM Press
ISBN: 9781555818593
Release Date: 2014-04-30
Genre: Science

A scientific overview of the association of microbes with cheese, through the lens of select cheese varieties that result due to surface mold ripening, internal mold ripening, rind washing, cave aging, or surface smear rind development. Over the past decade, there has been explosive growth in the U.S. artisan cheese industry. The editor, Ms. Donnelly, was involved in developing a comprehensive education curriculum for those new to cheese making, which focused on the science of cheese, principally to promote cheese quality and safety. Many of the chapters in this book focus on aspects of that requisite knowledge. • Explains the process of transformation of milk to cheese and how sensory attributes of cheese are evaluated. • Provides an overview of cheese safety and regulations governing cheese making, both in the US and abroad, to ensure safety. • Explores how the tools of molecular biology provide new insights into the complexity of the microbial biodiversity of cheeses. • Examines the biodiversity of traditional cheeses as a result of traditional practices, and overviews research on the stability of the microbial consortium of select traditional cheese varieties. • Key text for cheese makers, scientists, students, and cheese enthusiasts who wish to expand their knowledge of cheeses and traditional foods.

The Life of Cheese

Author: Heather Paxson
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520270176
Release Date: 2012-12-10
Genre: Social Science

"The Life of Cheese is the definitive work on America's artisanal food revolution. Heather Paxson's engaging stories are as rich, sharp, and well-grounded as the product she scrutinizes. A must read for anyone interested in fostering a sustainable food system." Warren Belasco, author of Meals to Come: A History of the Future of Food "Heather Paxson's lucid and engaging book, The Life of Cheese, is a gift to anyone interested in exploring the wonderful and wonderfully complex realities of artisan cheesemaking in the United States. Paxson deftly integrates careful considerations of the importance of sentiment, value and craft to the work of cheesemakers with vivid stories and lush descriptions of their farms, cheese plants and cheese caves. While she beguiles you with the stories and tastes of cheeses from Vermont, Wisconsin and California, she also asks you to envision a post-pastoral ethos in the making. This ethos reconsiders contemporary beliefs about America's food commerce and culture, reimagines our relationship to the natural world, and redefines how we make, eat, and appreciate food. For cheese aficionados, food activists, anthropologists and food scholars alike, reading The Life of Cheese will be a transformative experience." Amy Trubek, author of The Taste of Place: A Cultural Journey into Terroir

Cheddar

Author: Gordon Edgar
Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing
ISBN: 9781603585651
Release Date: 2015-10-21
Genre: Cooking

One of the oldest, most ubiquitous, and beloved cheeses in the world, the history of Cheddar is a fascinating one. Over the years it has been transformed, from a painstakingly handmade wheel to a rindless, mass-produced block, to a liquefied and emulsified plastic mass untouched by human hands. The Henry Fordism of Cheddar production in many ways anticipated the advent of industrial agriculture. They don't call it "American Cheese" for nothing.

The Science of Cheese

Author: Michael H. Tunick
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199922307
Release Date: 2014-04
Genre: Science

Describes the science of cheese making, from chemistry to biology, in a lively way that is readable for both the food scientist and the artisanal hobbyist.

The Book of Cheese

Author: Liz Thorpe
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781250063458
Release Date: 2017-09-26
Genre: Cooking

EXPLORE THE WORLD OF CHEESE BY ASKING YOURSELF ONE SIMPLE QUESTION: WHAT CHEESES DO I ALREADY LOVE? This is the first book of its kind to be organized not by country, milk type, or any other technical classification. The Book of Cheese maps the world of cheese using nine familiar favorites, what author Liz Thorpe calls the Gateway Cheeses. From basics like Swiss, blue, and cheddar, Liz leads the way to more adventurous types. Love Brie? Liz shows you how to find other Brie-like cheeses, from the mild Moses Sleeper to the pungent Fromage de Meaux. Her revolutionary approach allows food lovers to focus on what they really care about: finding more cheeses to enjoy. Complete with flavor and aroma wheels, charts guiding you through different intensities and availabilities, and gorgeous photography, this is the only book on cheese you will ever need.

The Oxford Companion to Cheese

Author:
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199330904
Release Date: 2016-10-25
Genre: Cooking

Winner of the 2017 James Beard Award for Reference & Scholarship The discovery of cheese is a narrative at least 8,000 years old, dating back to the Neolithic era. Yet, after all of these thousands of years we are still finding new ways to combine the same four basic ingredients - milk, bacteria, salt, and enzymes - into new and exciting products with vastly different shapes, sizes, and colors, and equally complex and varied tastes, textures, and, yes, aromas. In fact, after a long period of industrialized, processed, and standardized cheese, cheesemakers, cheesemongers, affineurs, and most of all consumers are rediscovering the endless variety of cheeses across cultures. The Oxford Companion to Cheese is the first major reference work dedicated to cheese, containing 855 A-Z entries on cheese history, culture, science, and production. From cottage cheese to Camembert, from Gorgonzola to Gruyère, there are entries on all of the major cheese varieties globally, but also many cheeses that are not well known outside of their region of production. The concentrated whey cheeses popular in Norway, brunost, are covered here, as are the traditional Turkish and Iranian cheeses that are ripened in casings prepared from sheep's or goat's skin. There are entries on animal species whose milk is commonly (cow, goat, sheep) and not so commonly (think yak, camel, and reindeer) used in cheesemaking, as well as entries on a few highly important breeds within each species, such as the Nubian goat or the Holstein cow. Regional entries on places with a strong history of cheese production, biographies of influential cheesemakers, innovative and influential cheese shops, and historical entries on topics like manorial cheesemaking and cheese in children's literature round out the Companion's eclectic cultural coverage. The Companion also reflects a fascination with the microbiology and chemistry of cheese, featuring entries on bacteria, molds, yeasts, cultures, and coagulants used in cheesemaking and cheese maturing. The blooms, veins, sticky surfaces, gooey interiors, crystals, wrinkles, strings, and yes, for some, the odors of cheese are all due to microbial action and growth. And today we have unprecedented insight into the microbial complexity of cheese, thanks to advances in molecular biology, whole-genome sequencing technologies, and microbiome research. The Companion is equally interested in the applied elements of cheesemaking, with entries on production methodologies and the technology and equipment used in cheesemaking. An astonishing 325 authors contributed entries to the Companion, residing in 35 countries. These experts included cheesemakers, cheesemongers, dairy scientists, anthropologists, food historians, journalists, archaeologists, and on, from backgrounds as diverse as the topics they write about. Every entry is signed by the author, and includes both cross references to related topics and further reading suggestions. The endmatter includes a list of cheese-related museums and a thorough index. Two 16-page color inserts and well over a hundred black and white images help bring the entries to life. This landmark encyclopedia is the most wide-ranging, comprehensive, and reliable reference work on cheese available, suitable for both novices and industry insiders alike.

The Hungry Empire

Author: Lizzie Collingham
Publisher: Vintage Books
ISBN: 0099586959
Release Date: 2018-08-09
Genre:

The glamorous daughter of an African chief shares a pineapple with a slave trader... Surveyors in British Columbia eat tinned Australian rabbit... Diamond prospectors in Guyana prepare an iguana curry... In twenty meals The Hungry Empire tells the story of how the British created a global network of commerce and trade in foodstuffs that moved people and plants from one continent to another, re-shaping landscapes and culinary tastes. The Empire allowed Britain to harness the globe's edible resources from cod fish and salt beef to spices, tea and sugar. Lizzie Collingham takes us on a wide-ranging culinary journey, revealing how virtually every meal we eat still contains a taste of empire.

Salted and Cured

Author: Jeffrey Roberts
Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing
ISBN: 9781603586610
Release Date: 2017-04-15
Genre: Cooking

From country ham to coppa, bacon to bresaola Prosciutto. Andouille. Country ham. The extraordinary rise in popularity of cured meats in recent years often overlooks the fact that the ancient practice of meat preservation through the use of salt, time, and smoke began as a survival technique. All over the world, various cultures developed ways to extend the viability of the hunt—and later the harvest—according to their unique climates and environments, resulting in the astonishing diversity of preserved meats that we celebrate and enjoy today everywhere from corner delis to white-tablecloth restaurants. In Salted and Cured, author Jeffrey P. Roberts traces the origins of today’s American charcuterie, salumi, and other delights, and connects them to a current renaissance that begins to rival those of artisan cheese and craft beer. In doing so, Roberts highlights the incredible stories of immigrant butchers, breeders, chefs, entrepreneurs, and other craftspeople who withstood the modern era’s push for bland, industrial food to produce not only delicious but culturally significant cured meats. By rejecting the industry-led push for “the other white meat” and reinvigorating the breeding and production of heritage hog breeds while finding novel ways to utilize the entire animal—snout to tail—today’s charcutiers and salumieri not only produce everything from country ham to violino di capra but create more sustainable businesses for farmers and chefs. Weaving together agriculture, animal welfare and health, food safety and science, economics, history, a deep sense of place, and amazing preserved foods, Salted and Cured is a literary feast, a celebration of both innovation and time-honored knowledge, and an expertly guided tour of America’s culinary treasures, both old and new.

Hungry for Peace

Author: Keith McHenry
Publisher: See Sharp Press
ISBN: 9781937276393
Release Date: 2013-03-01
Genre: Political Science

The de facto how-to manual of the international Food Not Bombs movement, which provides free food to the homeless and hungry and has branches in countries on every continent except Antarctica, this book describes at length how to set up and operate a Food Not Bombs chapter. The guide considers every aspect of the operation, from food collection and distribution to fund-raising, consensus decision making, and what to do when the police arrive. It contains detailed information on setting up a kitchen and cooking for large groups as well as a variety of delicious recipes. Accompanying numerous photographs is a lengthy section on the history of Food Not Bombs, with stories of the jailing and murder of activists, as well as premade handbills and flyers ready for photocopying.

Sapiens

Author: Yuval Noah Harari
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 9780062316103
Release Date: 2015-02-10
Genre: Science

New York Times Bestseller A Summer Reading Pick for President Barack Obama, Bill Gates, and Mark Zuckerberg From a renowned historian comes a groundbreaking narrative of humanity’s creation and evolution—a #1 international bestseller—that explores the ways in which biology and history have defined us and enhanced our understanding of what it means to be “human.” One hundred thousand years ago, at least six different species of humans inhabited Earth. Yet today there is only one—homo sapiens. What happened to the others? And what may happen to us? Most books about the history of humanity pursue either a historical or a biological approach, but Dr. Yuval Noah Harari breaks the mold with this highly original book that begins about 70,000 years ago with the appearance of modern cognition. From examining the role evolving humans have played in the global ecosystem to charting the rise of empires, Sapiens integrates history and science to reconsider accepted narratives, connect past developments with contemporary concerns, and examine specific events within the context of larger ideas. Dr. Harari also compels us to look ahead, because over the last few decades humans have begun to bend laws of natural selection that have governed life for the past four billion years. We are acquiring the ability to design not only the world around us, but also ourselves. Where is this leading us, and what do we want to become? Featuring 27 photographs, 6 maps, and 25 illustrations/diagrams, this provocative and insightful work is sure to spark debate and is essential reading for aficionados of Jared Diamond, James Gleick, Matt Ridley, Robert Wright, and Sharon Moalem.

A Geography of Digestion

Author: Nicholas Bauch
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520285804
Release Date: 2016-10-25
Genre: Cooking

"A Geography of Digestion explores the legacy of the Kellogg Company, one of America's most enduring and storied food enterprises. In the late nineteenth century, company founder John H. Kellogg was experimenting with state-of-the-art advances in nutritional and medical science at his Battle Creek Sanitarium. At the same time, he was involved in overhauling the form and function of the broader landscapes in which his health practice was situated. Innovations in food-manufacturing machinery, urban sewer infrastructure, and agricultural technology came together to forge an extensible geography of his patients' bodies, changing the way Americans consumed and digested food. In this novel approach to the study of the Kellogg enterprise, Nicholas Bauch asks his readers to think geographically about the process of digesting food. Beginning with the stomach, Bauch moves outward from the sanitarium through the landscapes and technologies that materialized Kellogg's particular version of digestion. Far from a set of organs confined to the epidermal bounds of the body, the digestive system existed in other places. Moving from food-processing machines, to urban sewerage, to agricultural fields, A Geography of Digestion paints a grounded portrait of one of the most basic human processes of survival--the incorporation of food into our bodies--leading us to question where exactly our bodies are located"--Provided by publisher.

A History of Cookbooks

Author: Henry Notaker
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520294004
Release Date: 2017
Genre: Cookbooks

-A History of Cookbooks provides a literary and historical overview of the cookbook genre, exploring its development as an important part of food culture beginning in the Late Middle Ages. Studying cookbooks from various Western cultures and languages, Henry Notaker traces the transformation of recipes from brief notes with ingredients into detailed recipes with a specific structure, grammar, and vocabulary. In addition, he reveals that cookbooks go far beyond offering recipes: they tell us a great deal about nutrition, morals, manners, history, and menus while often providing entertaining reflections and commentaries. This innovative book demonstrates that cookbooks represent an interesting and important branch of nonfiction literature.---Provided by publisher.

Successful Cheesemaking

Author: Merryl Winstein
Publisher:
ISBN: 0998595950
Release Date: 2017-06-29
Genre:

Learn traditional & professional ways of making the finest cheeses of cow's, goat's, or sheep's milk, using simple home equipment. Step-by-step instructions are clear and easy to follow. With over 800 beautiful black-and-white photos, your cheesemaking questions will be answered. Book progresses from the milk itself, through all kinds of renneted & non-renneted cheeses, grouped by each great cheese family. Learn how to make cheese just the way you like by varying the acidity, moisture, temperature, salting, and ripening so cheese can be strong or mild, hard or soft, mold-ripened or plain. Instructions range from lactic-coagulated Yogurt, Sour Cream, and Chevre, through renneted Bandaged Cheddar, Tomme, Alpine Comte-style, Brie-style, Gouda, stretched-curd Mozzarella, plus many more. There are washed-curd cheeses like Havarti and Raclette, whey cheeses like Ricotta and Mysost, and Scandinavian cheeses. In addition, ripening & rind treatments from dry-brushed to moldy, bloomy to smeared, are described in easy-to-understand detail. Learn about ingredients, equipment, and how to make cheese presses. All measurements in both metric and English. Includes Frequently Asked Questions, cheesemaking record-keeping charts, suppliers, further reading, references, 20-page glossary, & 30-page index. Foreword by Ricki Carroll. PARTIAL CONTENTS INCLUDE: The milk; supermarket pasteurized milk; proper milk cooling, handling, safety. Equipment & supplies; home cheese vat; pressing, building cheese presses. Recognizing problem recipes; rennet; starter cultures; acidity, pH meters. Flavor/texture development. Acid-plus-heat coagulated Ricotta, Pot Cheese, Sweet Feta-style; Mizithra. Lactic-acid-coagulated Buttermilk; Cottage Cheese; Sour Cream; Yogurt; Chevre: plain, molded, ashed; smoked Rygeost/Quark.Soft, fresh, renneted Feta-style, Cambanzola; Haloumi, Anari; Blue Cheese; Brie-style.Lightly pressed, renneted Farmer's Cheese; ripened, reddish Reblochon.Renneting; flocculation; clean break; texture at cutting. Mesophilic French Tomme; Bandaged Cheddar. Salting; rind treatments. Washed-curd Danish Havarti Esrom, Samsoe; Danbo. Smear ripening. Raclette; Gouda. Brushed rinds. Thermophilic styles: Kefalotyri, Comte, Emmental. Eyes. Stretched-curd Mozzarella, Scamorza, Burrata. Shaping.Whey cheeses: Ricotta, Manouri, Mysost/Gjetost, Crème Fraîche, Whey Butter, cultured Butter; Ghee.

Dangerous Digestion

Author: E. Melanie DuPuis
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520962132
Release Date: 2015-12-01
Genre: Cooking

Throughout American history, ingestion (eating) has functioned as a metaphor for interpreting and imagining this society and its political systems. Discussions of American freedom itself are pervaded with ingestive metaphors of choice (what to put in) and control (what to keep out). From the country’s founders to the abolitionists to the social activists of today, those seeking to form and reform American society have cast their social-change goals in ingestive terms of choice and control. But they have realized their metaphors in concrete terms as well, purveying specific advice to the public about what to eat or not. These conversations about “social change as eating” reflect American ideals of freedom, purity, and virtue. Drawing on social and political history as well as the history of science and popular culture, Dangerous Digestion examines how American ideas about dietary reform mirror broader thinking about social reform. Inspired by new scientific studies of the human body as a metabiome—a collaboration of species rather than an isolated, intact, protected, and bounded individual—E. Melanie DuPuis invokes a new metaphor—digestion—to reimagine the American body politic, opening social transformations to ideas of mixing, fermentation, and collaboration. In doing so, the author explores how social activists can rethink politics as inclusive processes that involve the inherently risky mixing of cultures, standpoints, and ideas.