Remembering the Kanji Volume 1

Author: James W. Heisig
Publisher: University of Hawaii Press
ISBN: 9780824831653
Release Date: 2007
Genre: Foreign Language Study

The aim of this book is to provide the student of Japanese with a simple method for correlating the writing and the meaning of Japanese characters in such a way as to make them both easy to remember. It is intended not only for the beginner, but also for the more advanced student looking for some relief from the constant frustration of how to write the kanji and some way to systematize what he or she already knows. The author begins with writing because--contrary to first impressions--it is in fact the simpler of the two. He abandons the traditional method of ordering the kanji according to their frequency of use and organizes them according to their component parts or "primitive elements." Assigning each of these parts a distinct meaning with its own distinct image, the student is led to harness the powers of "imaginative memory" to learn the various combinations that result. In addition, each kanji is given its own key word to represent the meaning, or one of the principal meanings, of that character. These key words provide the setting for a particular kanji's "story," whose protagonists are the primitive elements. In this way, students are able to complete in a few short months a task that would otherwise take years. Armed with the same skills as Chinese or Korean students, who know the meaning and writing of the kanji but not their pronunciation in Japanese, they are now in a much better position to learn to read (which is treated in a separate volume). For further information and a sample of the contents, visit http: ///www.nanzan-u.ac.jp/SHUBUNKEN/publications/miscPublications/Remembering_the_Kanji_l.htm.

Remembering the Kanji

Author: James W. Heisig
Publisher: University of Hawaii Press
ISBN: 9780824831660
Release Date: 2008-01
Genre: Foreign Language Study

Following the first volume of Remembering the Kanji, the present work takes up the pronunciation of characters and provides students with helpful tools for memorizing them. Behind the notorious inconsistencies in the way the Japanese language has come to pronounce the characters it received from China lie several coherent patterns. Identifying these patterns and arranging them in logical order can reduce dramatically the amount of time spent in the brute memorization of sounds unrelated to written forms. Many of the "primitive elements," or building blocks, used in the drawing of the characters also serve to indicate the "Chinese reading" that particular kanji use, chiefly in compound terms. By learning one of the kanji that uses such a "signal primitive," one can learn the entire group at the same time. In this way. Remembering the Kanji 2 lays out the varieties of phonetic patterns and offers helpful hints for learning readings, which might otherwise appear completely random, in an efficient and rational way. A parallel system of pronouncing the kanji, their "Japanese readings," uses native Japanese words assigned to particular Chinese characters. Although these are more easily learned because of the association of the meaning to a single word, Heisig creates a kind of phonetic alphabet of single-syllable words, each connected to a simple Japanese word, and shows how they can be combined to help memorize particularly troublesome vocabulary. Unlike Volume 1, which proceeds step-by-step in a series of lessons, Volume 2 is organized in such as way that one can study individual chapters or use it as a reference for pronunciation problems as they arise. Individual frames cross-referencethe kanji to alternate readings and to the frame in Volume 1 in which the meaning and writing of the kanji was first introduced.

Remembering the Kanji 3

Author: James W. Heisig
Publisher: University of Hawaii Press
ISBN: 9780824831677
Release Date: 2008-01
Genre: Foreign Language Study

Volume 2 (4th ed.) updated to include the 196 kanja approved in 2010 for general use.

Complete Guide to Japanese Kanji

Author: Christopher Seely
Publisher: Tuttle Publishing
ISBN: 9781462917730
Release Date: 2016-03-22
Genre: Foreign Language Study

Learn over 2,000 Japanese Kanji characters with this user-friendly Japanese language-learning book. This unique Kanji study guide provides a comprehensive introduction to all the Kanji characters on the Japanese Ministry of Education's official Joyo ("General Use") list—providing detailed notes on the historical development of each character as well as all information needed by students to read and write them. As fascinating as it is useful, this is the book every Japanese language learners keeps on his or her desk and visits over and over. This Kanji book includes: Clear, large-sized entries All of the General Use Joyo Kanji Characters Japanese readings and English meanings stroke-count stroke order usage examples mnemonic hints for easy memorization The components which make up each character are detailed and the Kanji are graded in difficulty according to Ministry of Education guidelines, allowing students to prioritize the order in which the Kanji are learned and track their progress. This book is essential to anyone who is planning to take the official Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) and will appeal to beginning students as well as those who wish to attain higher-level mastery of the Japanese language. It is the only book that also provides historical and etymological information about the Japanese Kanji. This latest edition has been updated to include all of the 2,136 Kanji on the expanded Joyo list issued by the Japanese government in 2010. Many entries have been revised to include the most recent research on character etymologies.

Remembering Traditional Hanzi

Author: James W. Heisig
Publisher: University of Hawaii Press
ISBN: OSU:32435082427451
Release Date: 2012
Genre: Foreign Language Study

This book is the second of two volumes designed to help students learn the meaning and writing of the 3,000 most frequently used traditional Chinese characters. (A parallel set of volumes has been prepared for simplified characters.) The 1,500 characters introduced in Book 1 include the top 1,000 by frequency, plus another 500 best learned at an early stage. Book 2 adds the remaining 1,500 characters to complete the set. The lessons of Book 2 have been arranged in such a way that they may be studied either after those of Book 1 or simultaneously with them. Students who wish to focus initially on the 1,000 most frequently used characters in the language can do so by studying Book 1 before moving on to Book 2. Many, if not most, learners will find this preferable. Students who wish to apply the logical ordering found in these pages to the entire list of 3,000 characters from the very beginning can take the more exacting, but also more rationally satisfying, approach of studying the parallel lessons of the two volumes together. The lessons in this book are followed by two short, additional sections, one that introduces a number of "compounds," or characters that are best learned in pairs, and another that adds two "postscripts." The book also includes a number of comprehensive indexes that are designed to facilitate work with both volumes. Of central importance to the approach found in these pages is the systematic arranging of characters in an order best suited to memory. In the Chinese writing system, strokes and simple components are nested within relatively simple characters. These characters, in turn, can serve as parts of more complicated characters, and so on. Taking advantage of this allows a logical ordering, making it possible for students to approach most new characters with prior knowledge that can greatly facilitate the learning process. Guidance and detailed instructions are provided all along the way. Students are taught to employ "imaginative memory" to associate each character's component parts or "primitive elements" with one another and with a key word that has been carefully selected to represent an important meaning of the character. This is accomplished through creation of a "story" that engagingly ties the primitive elements and key word together. In this way, the collections of dots, strokes and components that make up the characters are associated in memorable ways, dramatically shortening the time required for learning and helping prevent characters from slipping out of memory.

Remembering the Kanji A complete course on how not to forget the meaning and writing of Japanese characters

Author: James W. Heisig
Publisher: Kodansha
ISBN: 0870407392
Release Date: 1986
Genre: Foreign Language Study

From absolute beginners dreading the thought of acquiring literacy in Japanese to more advanced students looking for some relief to the constant frustration of forgetting how to remember the kanji, once you have cracked the covers of these books you will never be able to look at the kanji with the same eyes again.

Remembering the Kanji 1

Author: James W. Heisig
Publisher: University of Hawaii Press
ISBN: MINN:31951D037482406
Release Date: 2011
Genre: Foreign Language Study

Volume 2 (4th ed.) updated to include the 196 kanja approved in 2010 for general use.

Remembering Simplified Hanzi

Author: James W. Heisig
Publisher:
ISBN: IND:30000122535903
Release Date: 2009
Genre: Chinese language

Covers the writing and meaning of the 1,000 most commonly used characters in the Chinese writing system.

Kanji Study Cards

Author: James Heisig
Publisher: Japan Publication Trading Company
ISBN: 0870408852
Release Date: 1992-01-01
Genre: Foreign Language Study

Kanji Study Cards Boxed Case is a Japan Publications publication.

Kanji ABC

Author: Andreas Foerster
Publisher: Tuttle Publishing
ISBN: 0804819572
Release Date: 1994
Genre: Foreign Language Study

This text aims to simplify the task of memorizing the 1945 joyo kanji needed for daily use.

Let s Learn Kanji

Author: Joyce Yumi Mitamura
Publisher: Kodansha USA Incorporated
ISBN: 156836394X
Release Date: 2012
Genre: Foreign Language Study

Everyone agrees that it is possible to learn to speak Japanese in a reasonable amount of time, but no one has ever said that about reading and writing it. It is widely held that spoken and written Japanese require separate efforts by the student, as if these two aspects were in fact distinct languages. A first step toward alleviating this situation was taken by Yasuko Mitamura in 1985 with the publication of Let's Learn Hiragana and Let's Learn Katakana, which continue to help thousands of students every year to master these two forms of Japanese script. Now, Let's Learn Kanji goes to the heart of the problem: the learning of kanji (i.e., Chinese characters as they are used in Japan). Not simply a brilliant exposition but also a workbook, it teaches the student how to write the basic strokes, how to put these together into full-fledged kanji, and how kanji function in the context of example sentences. Progress is continually checked, and the student is encouraged through quizzes and exercises. The result: 250 fundamental characters learned almost painlessly.

Philosophers of Nothingness

Author: James W. Heisig
Publisher: University of Hawaii Press
ISBN: 0824824814
Release Date: 2001-01
Genre: Philosophy

The past twenty years have seen the publication of numerous translations and commentaries on the principal philosophers of the Kyoto School, but so far no general overview and evaluation of their thought has been available, either in Japanese or in Western languages. James Heisig, a longstanding participant in these efforts, has filled that gap with Philosophers of Nothingness. In this extensive study, the ideas of Nishida Kitaro, Tanabe Hajime, and Nishitani Keiji are presented both as a consistent school of thought in its own right and as a challenge to the Western philosophical tradition to open itself to the original contribution of Japan.