Reproducing the Future

Author: Marilyn Strathern
Publisher: Manchester University Press
ISBN: 0719036747
Release Date: 1992
Genre: Anthropology

These essays, written at the time when the Bill for Human Fertilization and Embryology Act (1990) was going through Parliament, touch on the British debate (on in vitro fertilization, gamete donation and maternal surrogacy) from an anthropological perspective. The implications of the medical developments that lay behind the Act are world-wide and these new procreative possibilities formulate new possibilities for thinking about kinship. The essays are informed by recent re-thinking of models of kinship in Melanesia.

Reproducing the Future

Author: Marilyn Strathern
Publisher: Manchester University Press
ISBN: 0719036747
Release Date: 1992
Genre: Anthropology

These essays, written at the time when the Bill for Human Fertilization and Embryology Act (1990) was going through Parliament, touch on the British debate (on in vitro fertilization, gamete donation and maternal surrogacy) from an anthropological perspective. The implications of the medical developments that lay behind the Act are world-wide and these new procreative possibilities formulate new possibilities for thinking about kinship. The essays are informed by recent re-thinking of models of kinship in Melanesia.

Theoretical Anthropology

Author: David Bidney
Publisher: Transaction Publishers
ISBN: 1412839777
Release Date: 1968
Genre: Social Science

Theoretical Anthropology is a major contribution to the historical and critical study of the assumptions underlying the development of modern cultural anthropology. In the new introduction, Martin Bidney discusses the present state of anthropology and contrasts it with the scene surveyed in Theoretical Anthropology. He discusses the relevance of David Bidney's work to our present concerns. Also included in this work is the second edition's introductory essay by David Bidney, written fifteen years after the first edition of Theoretical Anthropology. Here the author examines his original aims in writing this book. Theoretical Anthropology has helped to create among anthropologists the present climate of theoretical self-awareness and broad humanistic concerns. It has become a standard reference work for anthropologists as well as sociologists.

Relative Values

Author: Sarah Franklin
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822383222
Release Date: 2002-02-01
Genre: Social Science

The essays in Relative Values draw on new work in anthropology, science studies, gender theory, critical race studies, and postmodernism to offer a radical revisioning of kinship and kinship theory. Through a combination of vivid case studies and trenchant theoretical essays, the contributors—a group of internationally recognized scholars—examine both the history of kinship theory and its future, at once raising questions that have long occupied a central place within the discipline of anthropology and moving beyond them. Ideas about kinship are vital not only to understanding but also to forming many of the practices and innovations of contemporary society. How do the cultural logics of contemporary biopolitics, commodification, and globalization intersect with kinship practices and theories? In what ways do kinship analogies inform scientific and clinical practices; and what happens to kinship when it is created in such unfamiliar sites as biogenetic labs, new reproductive technology clinics, and the computers of artificial life scientists? How does kinship constitute—and get constituted by—the relations of power that draw lines of hierarchy and equality, exclusion and inclusion, ambivalence and violence? The contributors assess the implications for kinship of such phenomena as blood transfusions, adoption across national borders, genetic support groups, photography, and the new reproductive technologies while ranging from rural China to mid-century Africa to contemporary Norway and the United States. Addressing these and other timely issues, Relative Values injects new life into one of anthropology's most important disciplinary traditions. Posing these and other timely questions, Relative Values injects an important interdisciplinary curiosity into one of anthropology’s most important disciplinary traditions. Contributors. Mary Bouquet, Janet Carsten, Charis Thompson Cussins, Carol Delaney, Gillian Feeley-Harnik, Sarah Franklin, Deborah Heath, Stefan Helmreich, Signe Howell, Jonathan Marks, Susan McKinnon, Michael G. Peletz, Rayna Rapp, Martine Segalen, Pauline Turner Strong, Melbourne Tapper, Karen-Sue Taussig, Kath Weston, Yunxiang Yan

Biological Relatives

Author: Sarah Franklin
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822378259
Release Date: 2013-10-16
Genre: Social Science

Thirty-five years after its initial success as a form of technologically assisted human reproduction, and five million miracle babies later, in vitro fertilization (IVF) has become a routine procedure worldwide. In Biological Relatives, Sarah Franklin explores how the normalization of IVF has changed how both technology and biology are understood. Drawing on anthropology, feminist theory, and science studies, Franklin charts the evolution of IVF from an experimental research technique into a global technological platform used for a wide variety of applications, including genetic diagnosis, livestock breeding, cloning, and stem cell research. She contends that despite its ubiquity, IVF remains a highly paradoxical technology that confirms the relative and contingent nature of biology while creating new biological relatives. Using IVF as a lens, Franklin presents a bold and lucid thesis linking technologies of gender and sex to reproductive biomedicine, contemporary bioinnovation, and the future of kinship.

Earth Beings

Author: Marisol de la Cadena
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822375265
Release Date: 2015-09-21
Genre: Social Science

Earth Beings is the fruit of Marisol de la Cadena's decade-long conversations with Mariano and Nazario Turpo, father and son, runakuna or Quechua people. Concerned with the mutual entanglements of indigenous and nonindigenous worlds, and the partial connections between them, de la Cadena presents how the Turpos' indigenous ways of knowing and being include and exceed modern and nonmodern practices. Her discussion of indigenous political strategies—a realm that need not abide by binary logics—reconfigures how to think about and question modern politics, while pushing her readers to think beyond "hybridity" and toward translation, communication that accepts incommensurability, and mutual difference as conditions for ethnography to work.

Conceiving the New World Order

Author: Faye D. Ginsburg
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520089146
Release Date: 1995
Genre: Political Science

"Conceiving the New World Order promises to explore the consequences of making reproduction central to social theory in general, and it delivers on its promise abundantly. The feminist vision here is large, theoretically incisive, detailed, empirically deep, and politically inspiring. I will use these essays in teaching and research, but most of all in striving to inhabit the New World Order as a post-natal, born-again feminist."--Donna Haraway, University of California, Santa Cruz "A stunning collection that shifts the anthropology of reproduction onto the terrain of power, where it belongs. Conceiving the New World Order not only redefines reproduction by linking the body to the body politic but also shows the value of careful historical, social, and cultural analysis of the connection between the local and the global. It has much to teach anyone who wants to know how pregnancy, parenting, birth control, population policies, demography, and the new reproductive technologies shape and are shaped by women and the world."--Lila Abu-Lughod, author of Writing Women's Worlds: Bedouin Stories

After Kinship

Author: Janet Carsten
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521665701
Release Date: 2004
Genre: Fiction

What is the impact on anthropology of recent studies of reproductive technologies, gender, and the social construction of science in the West? What is the significance of public anxiety about the family to anthropology's analytic approach? Janet Carsten presents an original view of the past, present, and future of kinship in anthropology which will be of interest to anthropologists as well as to other social scientists.

Reproducing Reproduction

Author: Sarah Franklin
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812215842
Release Date: 1998
Genre: Family & Relationships

Reproducing Reproduction addresses these debates in a range of sites in which reproduction is being redefined and argues persuasively for a renewed appreciation of the centrality of reproductive politics to cultural and historical change.

Kinship and Gender

Author: Linda Stone
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9780429974717
Release Date: 2018-04-19
Genre: Social Science

Does kinship still matter in today's globalized, increasingly mobile world? Do family structures continue to influence the varied roles that men and women play in different cultures? Answering with a resounding ?yes!?, Linda Stone offers a lively introduction to and working knowledge of kinship. She firmly links these concepts to cross-cultural gender studies, illuminating the malleable nature of gender roles around the world and over time.Written to engage students, each chapter provides key terms and useful generalizations gleaned through cross-cultural research on the interplay of kinship and gender in both traditional societies and contemporary communities. Detailed case studies help students understand how such generalizations are experienced ?in real life.? Stone also considers the ramifications of current social problems and recent developments in reproductive technology as she demonstrates the relevance of kinship and gender to students' lives.The fully-revised fifth edition features discussion of cross-cultural examples complimented by expanded coverage of kinship and gender dynamics within the United States. Stone considers current evolutionary research on kinship and gender, and offers new case studies addressing international adoptions and polygynous marriage. An entirely new chapter explores the globalization of kinship in the 21st century. The result is a broad and captivating exploration of anthropological approaches to family and gender.

Technologies of Procreation

Author: Jeanette Edwards
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781134698073
Release Date: 2005-08-18
Genre: Social Science

Technologies of Procreation bridges the gap between medical technology and cultural values. It looks at the ways in which the 'technologies of procreation' affect society from an anthropological perspective.

Risky relations

Author: Katie Featherstone
Publisher: Berg Publishers
ISBN: 1845201787
Release Date: 2006-01-14
Genre: Medical

More and more conditions are now identified as having a genetic component, and controversial new genetic technologies potentially have major consequences for social relations and self-identity. How do family members respond to the information that they have a genetically transmitted disease or condition? How do they communicate (or not communicate) about their shared heritage? How do they decide who to tell and who not to tell within their family? Richly illustrated with the real experiences of individuals and families, Risky Relations is essential reading for anthropologists and sociologists of health and medicine, specialists in family and kinship, and health professionals concerned with the treatment and counseling of clients with genetic conditions. The lived impact of genetic technology on understanding within families with genetic conditions has never been systematically explored.

Conceiving Cuba

Author: Elise Andaya
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 9780813565217
Release Date: 2014-05-30
Genre: Social Science

After Cuba’s 1959 revolution, the Castro government sought to instill a new social order. Hoping to achieve a new and egalitarian society, the state invested in policies designed to promote the well-being of women and children. Yet once the Soviet Union fell and Cuba’s economic troubles worsened, these programs began to collapse, with serious results for Cuban families. Conceiving Cuba offers an intimate look at how, with the island’s political and economic future in question, reproduction has become the subject of heated public debates and agonizing private decisions. Drawing from several years of first-hand observations and interviews, anthropologist Elise Andaya takes us inside Cuba’s households and medical systems. Along the way, she introduces us to the women who wrestle with the difficult question of whether they can afford a child, as well as the doctors who, with only meager resources at their disposal, struggle to balance the needs of their patients with the mandates of the state. Andaya’s groundbreaking research considers not only how socialist policies have profoundly affected the ways Cuban families imagine the future, but also how the current crisis in reproduction has deeply influenced ordinary Cubans’ views on socialism and the future of the revolution. Casting a sympathetic eye upon a troubled state, Conceiving Cuba gives new life to the notion that the personal is always political.