Rising Tide

Author: John M. Barry
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781416563327
Release Date: 2007-09-17
Genre: Social Science

An American epic of science, politics, race, honor, high society, and the Mississippi River, Rising Tide tells the riveting and nearly forgotten story of the greatest natural disaster this country has ever known -- the Mississippi flood of 1927. The river inundated the homes of nearly one million people, helped elect Huey Long governor and made Herbert Hoover president, drove hundreds of thousands of blacks north, and transformed American society and politics forever. A New York Times Notable Book of the Year, winner of the Southern Book Critics Circle Award and the Lillian Smith Award.

Rising Tide

Author: John M. Barry
Publisher:
ISBN: UVA:X004092027
Release Date: 1997
Genre: Science

Provides an account of one of the greatest national disasters the United States has ever experienced and its consequences

Power Plays

Author: John M. Barry
Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi
ISBN: 157806404X
Release Date: 2001-01-01
Genre: Political Science

Barry, award-winning author of "

Roger Williams and the Creation of the American Soul

Author: John M. Barry
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9780143122883
Release Date: 2012
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

A revelatory analysis of the 17th-century theologian's integral role in shaping early America's religion, political power and individual rights places his story against a backdrop of Puritanism and the English Civil War while providing coverage of such subjects as Edward Coke and the evolving debate on the separation of church and state. By the award-winning author of Rising Tide.

Flood

Author: Kathleen Duey
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781481416443
Release Date: 2015-03-24
Genre: Juvenile Fiction

A rushing river with rapidly rising waters threatens the lives—and life savings—of two resourceful kids in this thrilling tale of historical fiction, part of the Survivors series. For years, Garret and Molly have dreamed of seeing more of the world than cotton fields and the dusty poverty of their Mississippi Delta farms. They’ve been stashing away hard-earned pennies and nickels in a tin-can bank, hidden deep in the bayou. Now rising flood waters threaten the hiding place of their money, and they set out on their homemade raft to retrieve it. But the raging Mississippi has other plans, and suddenly Garrett and Molly find themselves in a deadly battle with the dangerous currents and roiling rapids of their debris-strewn river—fighting not for their life savings, but for their lives.

Deep n as it Come

Author: Pete Daniel
Publisher: University of Arkansas Press
ISBN: 1557284016
Release Date: 1977
Genre: History

The spring and summer of 1927, the Mississippi River and its tributaries flooded from Cairo, Illinois, to New Orleans, Louisiana, and the Gulf of Mexico, tearing through seven states, sometimes spreading out to nearly one hundred miles across. Pete Daniel's Deep'n as It Come, available again in a new format, chronicles the worst flood in the history of the South and re-creates, with extraordinary immediacy, the Mississippi River's devastating assault on property and lives. Daniel weaves his narrative with newspaper and firsthand accounts, interviews with survivors, official reports, and over 140 contemporary photographs. The story of the common refugee who suffered most from the effects of the flood emerges alongside the details of the massive rescue and relief operation - one of the largest ever mounted in the United States. The title, Deep'n as It Come, is a phrase from Cora Lee Campbell's earthy description of the approaching water, which, Daniel writes, "moved at a pace of some fourteen miles per day," and, in its movement and sound, "had the eeriness of a full eclipse of the sun, unsettling, chilling." "The contradictions of sorrow and humor,... death and salvation, despair and hope, calm and panic - all reveal the human dimension" in this compassionate and unforgettable portrait of common people confronting a great natural disaster.

The Great Influenza

Author: John M. Barry
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101200979
Release Date: 2005-10-04
Genre: History

The definitive account of the 1918 Flu Epidemic. "Monumental"-Chicago Tribune. At the height of WWI, history’s most lethal influenza virus erupted in an army camp in Kansas, moved east with American troops, then exploded, killing as many as 100 million people worldwide. It killed more people in twenty-four months than AIDS killed in twenty-four years, more in a year than the Black Death killed in a century. But this was not the Middle Ages, and 1918 marked the first collision of science and epidemic disease. Magisterial in its breadth of perspective and depth of research and now revised to reflect the growing danger of the avian flu, The Great Influenza is ultimately a tale of triumph amid tragedy, which provides us with a precise and sobering model as we confront the epidemics looming on our own horizon. John M. Barry has written a new afterword for this edition that brings us up to speed on the terrible threat of the avian flu and suggest ways in which we might head off another flu pandemic.

Forgotten Time

Author: John C. Willis
Publisher: University of Virginia Press
ISBN: 0813919827
Release Date: 2000
Genre: History

Although it came to epitomize the Cotton South in the twentieth century, the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta emerged as a distinct entity in the decades following the Civil War. As other southerners confronted the need to rebuild, the Delta remained mostly wilderness in 1865. Elsewhere, planters struggled to maintain the perquisites of slaveholding and poor families tried desperately to escape the sharecropper's lot, yet Delta landlords offered generous terms to freed people willing to clear and cultivate backcountry acres subject to yellow fever and yearly flooding. By the turn of the century, two-thirds of the region's farmers were African Americans, whose holdings represented great political and economic strength. Most historical studies of the Delta have either lauded the achievements of its white planters or found its record number of lynchings representative of the worst aspects of the New South. By looking beyond white planters to the region as a whole, John C. Willis uncovers surprising evidence of African-American enterprise, the advantages of tenancy in an unstable cotton market, and the dominance of foreign-born merchants in the area, including many Chinese. Examining the lives of individuals--freedmen, planters, and merchants--Willis explores the reciprocal interests of former slaves and former slaveholders. He shows how, in a cruel irony replicated in other areas of the South, the backbreaking work that African Americans did to clear, settle, and farm the land away from the river made the land ultimately too valuable for them to retain. By the beginning of the twentieth century, the Delta began to devolve back into a stereotypical southern region with African Americans cast back into an impoverished, debt-ridden labor system. The Yazoo-Mississippi Delta has long been seen as a focal point for the study of Reconstruction, and Forgotten Time enters this historiographical tradition at the same time that it reverses many of its central assumptions.

Carry Me Home

Author: Diane McWhorter
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9780743226486
Release Date: 2001-06-29
Genre: History

Now with a new afterword, the Pulitzer Prize-winning dramatic account of the civil rights era’s climactic battle in Birmingham as the movement, led by Martin Luther King, Jr., brought down the institutions of segregation. "The Year of Birmingham," 1963, was a cataclysmic turning point in America’s long civil rights struggle. Child demonstrators faced down police dogs and fire hoses in huge nonviolent marches against segregation. Ku Klux Klansmen retaliated by bombing the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church, killing four young black girls. Diane McWhorter, daughter of a prominent Birmingham family, weaves together police and FBI records, archival documents, interviews with black activists and Klansmen, and personal memories into an extraordinary narrative of the personalities and events that brought about America’s second emancipation. In a new afterword—reporting last encounters with hero Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth and describing the current drastic anti-immigration laws in Alabama—the author demonstrates that Alabama remains a civil rights crucible.

The ambition and the power

Author: John M. Barry
Publisher: Penguin Group USA
ISBN: 0140104887
Release Date: 1990-11-01
Genre: History

At the peak of his career, Speaker of the House Jim Wright exercised more power than any other member of Congress in this century. Then, he became the first Speaker of the House to be forced from office. Here, Barry traces the polit ical and legal maneuvering, the deals, personal grudges, and professional "favors" through which our public policy is decided.

The Thousand Year Flood

Author: David Welky
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226887180
Release Date: 2011-08-19
Genre: History

In the early days of 1937, the Ohio River, swollen by heavy winter rains, began rising. And rising. And rising. By the time the waters crested, the Ohio and Mississippi had climbed to record heights. Nearly four hundred people had died, while a million more had run from their homes. The deluge caused more than half a billion dollars of damage at a time when the Great Depression still battered the nation. Timed to coincide with the flood's seventy-fifth anniversary, The Thousand-Year Flood is the first comprehensive history of one of the most destructive disasters in American history. David Welky first shows how decades of settlement put Ohio valley farms and towns at risk and how politicians and planners repeatedly ignored the dangers. Then he tells the gripping story of the river's inexorable rise: residents fled to refugee camps and higher ground, towns imposed martial law, prisoners rioted, Red Cross nurses endured terrifying conditions, and FDR dispatched thousands of relief workers. In a landscape fraught with dangers—from unmoored gas tanks that became floating bombs to powerful currents of filthy floodwaters that swept away whole towns—people hastily raised sandbag barricades, piled into overloaded rowboats, and marveled at water that stretched as far as the eye could see. In the flood's aftermath, Welky explains, New Deal reformers, utopian dreamers, and hard-pressed locals restructured not only the flood-stricken valleys, but also the nation's relationship with its waterways, changes that continue to affect life along the rivers to this day. A striking narrative of danger and adventure—and the mix of heroism and generosity, greed and pettiness that always accompany disaster—The Thousand-Year Flood breathes new life into a fascinating yet little-remembered American story.

The New Year s Eve Flood on Oahu Hawaii

Author: Committee on Natural Disasters
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 9780309044332
Release Date: 1990-01-01
Genre: Nature

The flood that greeted the new year in 1988 brought home the uncomfortable realization that many suburban areas of eastern Oahu are at risk from sudden and, in some cases, unpredictable flooding. Torrential rains fell over the southeastern portion of the island on New Year's Eve, precipitating major flooding in several suburban neighborhoods and resulting in $34 million in damages. Neither the current meteorological capabilities nor the present flood control structures for the Oahu area proved adequate to predict or control the deluge. This book documents and analyzes the meteorological conditions leading to the torrential rains, the causes and patterns of flooding, the performance of flood control structures in affected areas, the extent of damages, and the effectiveness of the local emergency response and recovery actions. Conclusions and recommendations are drawn from the analyses.

Washed Away

Author: Geoff Williams
Publisher: Open Road Media
ISBN: 9781453271636
Release Date: 2013-02-05
Genre: History

The true story of a catastrophic weather event that will “interest readers who enjoyed Erik Larson’s Isaac’s Storm” (Booklist). This is the incredible account of a flood of near-Biblical proportions in early twentieth-century America—its destruction, its heroes, its victims, and how it shaped natural-disaster policies in the United States for the next hundred years. The storm began March 23, 1913, with a series of tornadoes that killed 150 people and injured 400. Then the freezing rains started and the flooding began. It continued for days. Some people drowned in their attics, others on the roads when they tried to flee. It was the nation’s most widespread flood ever—more than 700 people died, hundreds of thousands of houses and buildings were destroyed, and millions were left homeless. The destruction extended far beyond the Ohio Valley to Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Nebraska, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Arkansas, Louisiana, Kentucky, West Virginia, New York, New Jersey, and Vermont—fourteen states in all, and every major and minor river east of the Mississippi. In the aftermath, flaws in America’s natural disaster response system were exposed, much as they would be nearly a century later in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. People demanded change. Laws were passed, and dams were built. Teams of experts vowed to develop flood control techniques for the region and stop flooding for good. So far, those efforts have succeeded—it is estimated that in the Miami Valley alone, nearly two thousand floods have been prevented, and the same methods have been used as a model for flood control nationwide and around the world. This suspenseful historical tale of a dramatic yet little-remembered disaster “weaves tragic and heroic stories of people in the various affected states into an almost hour-by-hour account of the deadly storm” (Booklist).

Wicked River

Author: Lee Sandlin
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 9780307473578
Release Date: 2011-10
Genre: History

No Marketing Blurb

A Man Called Destruction

Author: Holly George-Warren
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9780698151420
Release Date: 2014-03-20
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

The first biography of the artist who “essentially invented indie and alternative rock” (Spin) A brilliant and influential songwriter, vocalist, and guitarist, the charismatic Alex Chilton was more than a rock star—he was a true cult icon. Awardwinning music writer Holly George-Warren’s A Man Called Destruction is the first biography of this enigmatic artist, who died in 2010. Covering Chilton’s life from his early work with the charttopping Box Tops and the seminal power-pop band Big Star to his experiments with punk and roots music and his sprawling solo career, A Man Called Destruction is the story of a musical icon and a richly detailed chronicle of pop music’s evolution, from the mid-1960s through today’s indie rock.