Rosalind Franklin

Author: Brenda Maddox
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 9780062283504
Release Date: 2013-02-26
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

In 1962, Maurice Wilkins, Francis Crick, and James Watson received the Nobel Prize, but it was Rosalind Franklin's data and photographs of DNA that led to their discovery. Brenda Maddox tells a powerful story of a remarkably single-minded, forthright, and tempestuous young woman who, at the age of fifteen, decided she was going to be a scientist, but who was airbrushed out of the greatest scientific discovery of the twentieth century.

Gender and Genes

Author: Klasien Horstman
Publisher: Uitgeverij Verloren
ISBN: 9789087043940
Release Date: 2013
Genre: Genetics

This Yearbook of Women's History (Jaarboek voor Vrouwengeschiedenis) is dedicated to Gender and Genes. Intruding upon our everyday lives, the world of DNA, genes and genomics has become a challenging field of research, both clinical and biomedical as well as socio-cultural. It is also a challenging topic for a Yearbook which traditionally focuses on women and gender from a historical point of view. Gender issues are part and parcel of genes and genomics in scientific research and socio-cultural discourses and representations. Current literature on genes and genomics does not abound in analyses of biomedical and socio-cultural realms where gender aspects are played out and exchanged. This Yearbookmay thus contribute to a field of analysis which contextualizes history from the viewpoint of current biotechnological developments. This volume contains articles on medical cases (reproductive testing and the case of the sex chromosomes, and framing cancer risk in women and men), cultural representations, a portrait of female scientist Rosalin Franklin and interviews with feminist science philosophers Katarina Karkazis and Donna Dickenson.

The Deeper Genome

Author: John Parrington
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780199688739
Release Date: 2015
Genre: Science

As the Human Genome Project completed its mapping of the entire human genome, hopes ran high that we would rapidly be able to use our knowledge of human genes to tackle many inherited diseases, and understand what makes us unique among animals. But things didn't turn out that way ... but the emerging picture is if anything far more exciting. Parrington gives an outline of the deeper genome, involving layers of regulatory elements controlling and coordinating the switching on and off of genes; the impact of its 3D geometry; the discovery of a variety of new RNAs playing critical roles; the epigenetic changes influenced by the environment and life experiences that can make identical twins different and be passed on to the next generation; and the clues coming out of comparisons with the genomes of Neanderthals as well as that of chimps about the development of our species.

Remembering Women Differently

Author: Lynée Lewis Gaillet
Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press
ISBN: 9781611179804
Release Date: 2019-05-23
Genre: Language Arts & Disciplines

Before the full and honest tale of humanity can be told, it will be necessary to uncover the hidden roles of women in it and recover their voices from the forces that have diminished their contributions or even at times deliberately eclipsed them. The past half-century has seen women rise to claim their equal portion of recognition, and Remembering Women Differently addresses not only some of those neglected—it examines why they were deliberately erased from history. The contributors in this collection study the contributions of fourteen nearly forgotten women from around the globe working in fields that range from art to philosophy, from teaching to social welfare, from science to the military, and how and why those individuals became either marginalized or discounted in a mostly patriarchal world. These sterling contributors, scholars from a variety of disciplines—rhetoricians, historians, compositionists, and literary critics—employ feminist research methods in examining women’s work, rhetorical agency, and the construction of female reputation. By recovering these voices and remembering the women whose contributions have made our civilization better and more whole, this work seeks to ensure that women’s voices are never silenced again.

My Sister Rosalind Franklin

Author: Jenifer Glynn
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199699629
Release Date: 2012-03-22
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

The sister of the molecular biologist describes Rosalind Franklin's life, including her early eduction, her relations with her family, her time as a student at Cambridge University, and her scientific achievements.

50 Years of DNA

Author: J. Clayton
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9781137117816
Release Date: 2016-04-30
Genre: Literary Criticism

Crick and Watson's discovery of the structure of DNA fifty years ago marked one of the great turning points in the history of science. Biology, immunology, medicine and genetics have all been radically transformed in the succeeding half-century, and the double helix has become an icon of our times. This fascinating exploration of a scientific phenomenon provides a lucid and engaging account of the background and context for the discovery, its significance and afterlife, while a series of essays by leading scientists, historians and commentators offers uniquely individual perspectives on DNA and its impact on modern science and society.

Women of Vision

Author: Eileen A. Gavin, PhD
Publisher: Springer Publishing Company
ISBN: 0826101100
Release Date: 2007-03-20
Genre: Social Science

From the reviews: "Women of Vision blends biographical narrative with psychological perspectives on human development, resulting in a moving and passionate book that is suitable for both academic and nonacademic readers. It is a useful tool for teaching purposes or for simple, enjoyable, and informative reading." --Psychology of Women Quarterly "...a fascinating look of preservation and perceptiveness that is differentiated from its predecessors in its range of disciplines and emphasis...This new 'life course' approach to understanding female leaders gives valuable insight into the lives of these imminent women, furnishing insights into how the social-economic-political milieu and the attitudes and values of the time played a significant role in the lives of these women but also in all our lives. Women of Vision will serve as a springboard for exploration of how the psychologies of individual human lives affect their life-course and as a galvanizing step for many more future women of vision and leadership....The accounts in the book should be of substantial significance for readers interested in gender issues. However, the book will appeal to an even wider audience. Persons hoping to move in new directions in their own lives (e.g., women looking wistfully at new academic and occupational paths after years in stereotypic niches) can surely also find inspiration in the various accounts."--SirReadaLot.org We all know of women of great vision; women whose efforts and accomplishments have had a major impact on the arts, politics, women's rights, sports, or science. But often we may not understand how they became such powerful agents of change and what sorts of questions we should ask of their pasts to understand how the trajectories of their lives were formed. In this extraordinary textbook, leading experts cast new light on the role of circumstance, accomplishments, and personality in the development of various twentieth-century women of vision. This is a brand new life-course approach to understanding female leaders and gives valuable insight into the lives of such eminent women as Rachel Carson, Evelyn Gentry Hooker, Georgia O'Keeffe, Eleanor Roosevelt, "Babe" Didrikson Zaharias, Ella Fitzgerald, Alice Paul, Lucille Ball, and many others. Study questions and exercises at the end of each chapter further enhance the text. Women of Vision will serve as the springboard for exploration of how the psychologies of individual human lives affect their life-course and a galvanizing step for many more future women of vision and leadership.

The Rough Guide to Genes Cloning

Author: Rough Guides
Publisher: Rough Guides UK
ISBN: 9781848362246
Release Date: 2007-04-26
Genre: Science

What exactly is a gene? How does cloning actually work? Are designer babies a bad idea? Could we ever clone a human? The Rough Guide To Genes & Cloning answers all these questions and more. From the inside story of cells and their structure and the sleuths who cracked the genetic code to DNA cloning, twins and Dolly the sheep. Illustrated throughout with helpful pictures and diagrams, this Rough Guide turns the microscope on the things that make us what we are.

Why Millions Died

Author: George H. Scherr
Publisher: University Press of America
ISBN: 9780761855552
Release Date: 2011-11
Genre: Medical

This book reviews the slow development of research by isolated investigators who believed that diseases could be caused by infectious organisms. Millions of deaths occurred until the professional communities and general public began to believe that certain health measures could protect against infection and reduce enormous death tolls from disease.

Nursing History Review Volume 15 2007

Author: Patricia D’Antonio, RN, PhD, FAAN
Publisher: Springer Publishing Company
ISBN: 0826114695
Release Date: 2006-09-18
Genre: Medical

Nursing History Review, an annual peer-reviewed publication of the American Association for the History of Nursing, is a showcase for the most significant current research on nursing history. Regular sections include scholarly articles, over a dozen book reviews of the best publications on nursing and health care history that have appeared in the past year, and a section abstracting new doctoral dissertations on nursing history. Historians, researchers, and individuals interested with the rich field of nursing will find this an important resource.

The Man in the Monkeynut Coat

Author: Kersten T. Hall
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 9780191009891
Release Date: 2014-06-12
Genre: Science

Sir Isaac Newton once declared that his momentous discoveries were only made thanks to having 'stood on the shoulders of giants'. The same might also be said of the scientists James Watson and Francis Crick. Their discovery of the structure of DNA was, without doubt, one of the biggest scientific landmarks in history and, thanks largely to the success of Watson's best-selling memoir 'The Double Helix', there might seem to be little new to say about this story. But much remains to be said about the particular 'giants' on whose shoulders Watson and Crick stood. Of these, the crystallographer Rosalind Franklin, whose famous X-ray diffraction photograph known as 'Photo 51' provided Watson and Crick with a vital clue, is now well recognised. Far less well known is the physicist William T. Astbury who, working at Leeds in the 1930s on the structure of wool for the local textile industry, pioneered the use of X-ray crystallography to study biological fibres. In so doing, he not only made the very first studies of the structure of DNA culminating in a photo almost identical to Franklin's 'Photo 51', but also founded the new science of 'molecular biology'. Yet whilst Watson and Crick won the Nobel Prize, Astbury has largely been forgotten. The Man in the Monkeynut Coat tells the story of this neglected pioneer, showing not only how it was thanks to him that Watson and Crick were not left empty-handed, but also how his ideas transformed biology leaving a legacy which is still felt today.

Women and Science

Author: Suzanne Le-May Sheffield
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 9780813537375
Release Date: 2006
Genre: Science

From Maria Winkelman's discovery of the comet of 1702 to the Nobel Prize-winning work of twentieth-century scientist Barbara McClintock, women have played a central role in modern science. Their successes have not come easily, nor have they been consistently recognized. This book examines the challenges and barriers women scientists have faced and chronicles their achievements as they struggled to attain recognition for their work in the male-dominated world of modern science.

Writing about Lives in Science

Author: Paola Govoni
Publisher: V&R unipress GmbH
ISBN: 9783847102632
Release Date: 2014
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

Following discussions on scientific biography carried out over the past few decades, this book proposes a kaleidoscopic survey of the uses of biography as a tool to understand science and its context. The authors belong to a variety of academic and professional fields, including the history of science, anthropology, literary studies, and science journalism. The period covered spans from 1732, when Laura Bassi was the first woman to get a tenured professorship of physics, to 2009, when Elizabeth H. Blackburn and Carol W. Greider were the first women's team to have won a Nobel Prize in science.

DNA A Graphic Guide to the Molecule that Shook the World

Author: Israel Rosenfield
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231512312
Release Date: 2011-02-02
Genre: Science

With humor, depth, and philosophical and historical insight, DNA reaches out to a wide range of readers with its graphic portrayal of a complicated science. Suitable for use in and out of the classroom, this volume covers DNA's many marvels, from its original discovery in 1869 to early-twentieth-century debates on the mechanisms of inheritance and the deeper nature of life's evolution and variety. Even readers who lack a background in science and philosophy will learn a tremendous amount from this engaging narrative. The book elucidates DNA's relationship to health and the cause and cure of disease. It also covers the creation of new life forms, nanomachines, and perspectives on crime detection, and considers the philosophical sources of classical Darwinian theory and recent, radical changes in the understanding of evolution itself. Already these developments have profoundly affected our notions about living things. Borin Van Loon's humorous illustrations recount the contributions of Gregor Mendel, Frederick Griffith, James Watson, and Francis Crick, among other biologists, scientists, and researchers, and vividly depict the modern controversies surrounding the Human Genome Project and cloning.

Prize Fight

Author: Morton Meyers, M.D.
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 9781137000569
Release Date: 2012-06-05
Genre: Science

We often think of scientists as dispassionate and detached, nobly laboring without any expectation of reward. But scientific research is much more complicated and messy than this ideal, and scientists can be torn by jealousy, impelled by a need for recognition, and subject to human vulnerability and fallibility. In Prize Fight , Emeritus Chair at SUNY School of Medicine Morton Meyers pulls back the curtain to reveal the dark side of scientific discovery. From allegations of stolen authorship to fabricated results and elaborate hoaxes, he shows us how too often brilliant minds are reduced to petty jealousies and promising careers cut short by disputes over authorship or fudged data. Prize Fight is a dramatic look at some of the most notable discoveries in science in recent years, from the discovery of insulin, which led to decades of infighting and even violence, to why the 2003 Nobel Prize in Medicine exposed how often scientific objectivity is imperiled.