Safe Haven A History of Refugees in America

Author: David W. Haines
Publisher: Kumarian Press
ISBN: 9781565493957
Release Date: 2012-03-01
Genre: Law

The notion of America as land of refuge is vital to American civic consciousness yet over the past seventy years the country has had a complicated and sometimes erratic relationship with its refugee populations. Attitudes and actions toward refugees from the government, voluntary organizations, and the general public have ranged from acceptance to rejection; from well-wrought program efforts to botched policy decisions. Drawing on a wide range of contemporary and historical material, and based on the author s three-decade experience in refugee research and policy, "Safe Haven?" provides an integrated portrait of this crucial component of American immigration and of American engagement with the world. Covering seven decades of immigration history, Haines shows how refugees and their American hosts continue to struggle with national and ethnic identities and the effect this struggle has had on American institutions and attitudes.

Safe Haven

Author: David Haines
ISBN: 156549332X
Release Date: 2010
Genre: History

"Haines brings his long personal history with refugees dating to the Vietnam War era together with his skills and knowledge from academia and government service to weave a historical and contemporary tapestry of refugee life in America that is both personal and analytic."---Bill Frelick, Refugee Program Director, Human Rights Watch --


Author: Ruth Gruber
Publisher: Open Road Media
ISBN: 9781453206065
Release Date: 2010-10-19
Genre: History

Award-winning journalist Ruth Gruber’s powerful account of a top-secret mission to rescue one thousand European refugees in the midst of World War II In 1943, nearly one thousand European Jewish refugees from eighteen different countries were chosen by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s administration to receive asylum in the United States. All they had to do was get there. Ruth Gruber, with the support of Secretary of the Interior Harold Ickes, volunteered to escort them on their secret route across the Atlantic from a port in Italy to a “safe haven” camp in Oswego, New York. The dangerous endeavor carried the threat of Nazi capture with each passing day. While on the ship, Gruber recorded the refugees’ emotional stories and recounts them here in vivid detail, along with the aftermath of their arrival in the US, which involved a fight for their right to stay after the war ended. The result is a poignant and engrossing true story of suffering under Nazi persecution and incredible courage in the face of overwhelming circumstances.

The Nazis Next Door

Author: Eric Lichtblau
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 9780547669199
Release Date: 2014-10-28
Genre: History

"The shocking story of how America became one of the world's safest postwar havens for Nazis. Until recently, historians believed America gave asylum only to key Nazi scientists after World War II, along with some less famous perpetrators who managed to sneak in and who eventually were exposed by Nazi hunters. But the truth is much worse, and has been covered up for decades: the CIA and FBI brought thousands of perpetrators to America as possible assets against their new Cold War enemies. When the Justice Department finally investigated and learned the truth, the results were classified and buried. Using the dramatic story of one former perpetrator who settled in New Jersey, conned the CIA into hiring him, and begged for the agency's support when his wartime identity emerged, Eric Lichtblau tells the full, shocking story of how America became a refuge for hundreds of postwar Nazis"--

Asylum Denied

Author: David Ngaruri Kenney
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520261594
Release Date: 2009-08-17
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

Describes one political refugee's long and difficult struggle through immigration processing, detailing his imprisonment in Kenya, his escape to the U.S., and the ordeal of dealing with a bureaucracy that sought to deport him.

Americans in Waiting

Author: Hiroshi Motomura
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199887438
Release Date: 2007-09-17
Genre: Law

Although America is unquestionably a nation of immigrants, its immigration policies have inspired more questions than consensus on who should be admitted and what the path to citizenship should be. In Americans in Waiting, Hiroshi Motomura looks to a forgotten part of our past to show how, for over 150 years, immigration was assumed to be a transition to citizenship, with immigrants essentially being treated as future citizens--Americans in waiting. Challenging current conceptions, the author deftly uncovers how this view, once so central to law and policy, has all but vanished. Motomura explains how America could create a more unified society by recovering this lost history and by giving immigrants more, but at the same time asking more of them. A timely, panoramic chronicle of immigration and citizenship in the United States, Americans in Waiting offers new ideas and a fresh perspective on current debates.

Let Me Be a Refugee

Author: Rebecca Hamlin
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780199373314
Release Date: 2014
Genre: Law

"This book compares the refugee status determination (RSD) regimes of three popular asylum seeker destinations. Despite similarly high levels of political resistance to accepting asylum seekers, because administrative justice is conceptualized and organized differently in every state, they vary in how they draw the line between refugee and non-refugee"--

Sanctuary and Asylum

Author: Linda Rabben
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 9780295999142
Release Date: 2016-08-25
Genre: Political Science

The practice of sanctuary�giving refuge to the threatened, vulnerable stranger�may be universal among humans. From primate populations to ancient religious traditions to the modern legal institution of asylum, anthropologist Linda Rabben explores the long history of sanctuary and analyzes modern asylum policies in North America, Europe, and elsewhere, contrasting them with the role that courageous individuals and organizations have played in offering refuge to survivors of torture, persecution, and discrimination. Rabben gives close attention to the mid-2010s refugee crisis in Europe and to Central Americans seeking asylum in the United States. This wide-ranging, timely, and carefully documented account draws on Rabben�s experiences as a human rights advocate as well as her training as an anthropologist. Sanctuary and Asylum will help citizens, professionals, and policy makers take informed and compassionate action.

Immigration Structures and Immigrant Lives

Author: David W. Haines
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9781442260115
Release Date: 2017-10-20
Genre: Social Science

Immigration Structures and Immigrant Lives provides a concise, comprehensive, interdisciplinary introduction to United States immigration and immigrants. The book is presented in two parts. Part I addresses the history, structure, dynamics, and politics of United States immigration from colonial times to the present. Part II focuses on the lives of immigrants with separate chapters examining the immigrant struggle simply to live, the challenges and opportunities of work in America, the different beliefs and commitments that fortify immigrants in their new lives, and the many different ways in which immigrants come to belong in the United States. The introduction and epilogue bracket the United States experience within a broader consideration of human mobility and current global migration trends and issues. Tables, case examples, and a timeline help illuminate both the general shape of immigration and the details of immigrant life. This text is accompanied by an ancillary package of digital tables and illustrations in order to enhance the learning experience of both the instructors and students.

Wind Over Water

Author: David W. Haines
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 9780857457400
Release Date: 2012
Genre: Social Science

Providing a comprehensive treatment of a full range of migrant destinies in East Asia by scholars from both Asia and North America, this volume captures the way migrants are changing the face of Asia, especially in cities, such as Beijing, Hong Kong, Hamamatsu, Osaka, Tokyo, and Singapore. It investigates how the crossing of geographical boundaries should also be recognized as a crossing of cultural and social categories that reveals the extraordinary variation in the migrants' origins and trajectories. These migrants span the spectrum: from Korean bar hostesses in Osaka to African entrepreneurs in Hong Kong, from Vietnamese women seeking husbands across the Chinese border to Pakistani Muslim men marrying women in Japan, from short-term business travelers in China to long-term tourists from Japan who ultimately decide to retire overseas. Illuminating the ways in which an Asian-based analysis of migration can yield new data on global migration patterns, the contributors provide important new theoretical insights for a broader understanding of global migration, and innovative methodological approaches to the spatial and temporal complexity of human migration. David W. Haines is Professor of Anthropology at George Mason University. He is the author of Safe Haven? A History of Refugees in America (2010), has twice been a Fulbright scholar, and is a former president of the Society for Urban, National, and Transnational/Global Anthropology (SUNTA). Keiko Yamanaka is a Lecturer in the Departments of Ethnic Studies and International and Area Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. Her work appears in a range of books and journals, including Paci c Affairs; Ethnic and Racial Studies; Diaspora; Asian and Paci c Migration Journal; and Publications of the United Nations Research Institute for Social Development (UNRISD). Shinji Yamashita is Professor of Cultural Anthropology at the University of Tokyo and former president of the Japanese Society of Cultural Anthropology, the world's second largest national anthropology association. He is the author of Bali and Beyond: Explorations in the Anthropology of Tourism (2003)."

The Middle of Everywhere

Author: Mary Bray Pipher
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0156027372
Release Date: 2003-07-01
Genre: Social Science

Offers the tales of refugees who have escaped countries riddled by conflict and ripped apart by war to realize their dream of starting a new life in America, detailing their triumph over adversity.

A Safe Haven

Author: Ronald Radosh
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 9780061940675
Release Date: 2009-05-12
Genre: History

“[This] revelatory account of Truman's vital contributions to Israel's founding. . .is told. . . with an elegance informed by thorough research." —Wall Street Journal "Even knowing how the story ends, A Safe Haven had me sitting on the edge of my seat.” —Cokie Roberts A dramatic, detailed account of the events leading up to the creation of a Jewish homeland and the true story behind President Harry S. Truman’s controversial decision to recognize of the State of Israel in 1948, drawn from Truman’s long-lost diary entries and other previously unused archival materials.

Give Refuge to the Stranger

Author: Linda Rabben
Publisher: Left Coast Press
ISBN: 9781611320299
Release Date: 2011-02-28
Genre: History

Linda Rabben tells the story of sanctuary as it evolved over thousands of years around the world, from its origins in primate populations, to its elaboration in ancient religious traditions, to modern asylum laws and to current threats to immigration and human rights.

Seeking Refuge

Author: Maria Cristina Garcia
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520939431
Release Date: 2006-03-06
Genre: Social Science

The political upheaval in Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Guatemala had a devastating human toll at the end of the twentieth century. A quarter of a million people died during the period 1974-1996. Many of those who survived the wars chose temporary refuge in neighboring countries such as Honduras and Costa Rica. Others traveled far north, to Mexico, the United States, and Canada in search of safety. Over two million of those who fled Central America during this period settled in these three countries. In this incisive book, María Cristina García tells the story of that migration and how domestic and foreign policy interests shaped the asylum policies of Mexico, the United States, and Canada. She describes the experiences of the individuals and non-governmental organizations—primarily church groups and human rights organizations—that responded to the refugee crisis, and worked within and across borders to shape refugee policy. These transnational advocacy networks collected testimonies, documented the abuses of states, re-framed national debates about immigration, pressed for changes in policy, and ultimately provided a voice for the displaced. García concludes by addressing the legacies of the Central American refugee crisis, especially recent attempts to coordinate a regional response to the unique problems presented by immigrants and refugees—and the challenges of coordinating such a regional response in the post-9/11 era.


Author: Leonardo Padura
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 9780374714284
Release Date: 2017-03-14
Genre: Fiction

"Padura’s Heretics spans and defies literary categories . . . ingenious." —Maureen Corrigan, Fresh Air A sweeping novel of art theft, anti-Semitism, contemporary Cuba, and crime from a renowned Cuban author, Heretics is Leonardo Padura's greatest detective work yet. In 1939, the Saint Louis sails from Hamburg into Havana’s port with hundreds of Jewish refugees seeking asylum from the Nazi regime. From the docks, nine-year-old Daniel Kaminsky watches as the passengers, including his mother, father, and sister, become embroiled in a fiasco of Cuban corruption. But the Kaminskys have a treasure that they hope will save them: a small Rembrandt portrait of Christ. Yet six days later the vessel is forced to leave the harbor with the family, bound for the horrors of Europe. The Kaminskys, along with their priceless heirloom, disappear. Nearly seven decades later, the Rembrandt reappears in an auction house in London, prompting Daniel’s son to travel to Cuba to track down the story of his family’s lost masterpiece. He hires the down-on-his-luck private detective Mario Conde, and together they navigate a web of deception and violence in the morally complex city of Havana. In Heretics, Leonardo Padura takes us from the tenements and beaches of Cuba to Rembrandt’s gloomy studio in seventeenth-century Amsterdam, telling the story of people forced to choose between the tenets of their faith and the realities of the world, between their personal desires and the demands of their times. A grand detective story and a moving historical drama, Padura’s novel is as compelling, mysterious, and enduring as the painting at its center.