Seeking Our Past

Author: Sarah Ward Neusius
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0195173856
Release Date: 2007
Genre: History


The Cambridge Companion to Historical Archaeology

Author: Dan Hicks
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781107495173
Release Date: 2006-10-26
Genre: Social Science

The Cambridge Companion to Historical Archaeology provides an overview of the international field of historical archaeology (c.AD 1500 to the present) through seventeen specially-commissioned essays from leading researchers in the field. The volume explores key themes in historical archaeology including documentary archaeology, the writing of historical archaeology, colonialism, capitalism, industrial archaeology, maritime archaeology, cultural resource management and urban archaeology. Three special sections explore the distinctive contributions of material culture studies, landscape archaeology and the archaeology of buildings and the household. Drawing on case studies from North America, Europe, Australasia, Africa and around the world, the volume captures the breadth and diversity of contemporary historical archaeology, considers archaeology's relationship with history, cultural anthropology and other periods of archaeological study, and provides clear introductions to alternative conceptions of the field. This book is essential reading for anyone studying or researching the material remains of the recent past.

North American Archaeology

Author: Timothy R. Pauketat
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISBN: 0631231846
Release Date: 2004-12-27
Genre: Social Science

This volume offers a rich and informative introduction to North American archaeology for all those interested in the history and culture of North American natives. Organized around central topics and debates within the discipline. Illustrated with case studies based on the lives of real people, to emphasize human agency, cultural practice, the body, issues of inequality, and the politics of archaeological practice. Highlights current understandings of cultural and historical processes in North America and situates these understandings within a global perspective.

Unearthing Gotham

Author: Anne-Marie E. Cantwell
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300097999
Release Date: 2003-10-01
Genre: History

This book looks at New York from a new perspective, an archaeological one. Describing the exciting discoveries of long lost worlds found beneath the modern metropolis, the authors present a narrative of the many peoples who shared and shaped the land that is now New York City, including nineteenth-century families, Dutch and English colonists, enslaved Africans, and the Native Americans who arrived eleven thousand years ago.

Skull Wars

Author: David H. Thomas
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0786724366
Release Date: 2001-04-05
Genre: Social Science

The 1996 discovery, near Kennewick, Washington, of a 9,000-year-old Caucasoid skeleton brought more to the surface than bones. The explosive controversy and resulting lawsuit also raised a far more fundamental question: Who owns history? Many Indians see archeologists as desecrators of tribal rites and traditions; archeologists see their livelihoods and science threatened by the 1990 Federal reparation law, which gives tribes control over remains in their traditional territories.In this new work, Thomas charts the riveting story of this lawsuit, the archeologists' deteriorating relations with American Indians, and the rise of scientific archeology. His telling of the tale gains extra credence from his own reputation as a leader in building cooperation between the two sides.

The Cambridge Illustrated History of Prehistoric Art

Author: Paul G. Bahn
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521454735
Release Date: 1998
Genre: Art

Surveys prehistoric art throughout the world, including body art, art on rocks and walls, and objects; changes in scholarship; and what the art can reveal about early sexual, social, economic, and religious life

Children of the Past

Author: Lois Miner Huey
Publisher: Millbrook Press
ISBN: 9781512438789
Release Date: 2017-01-01
Genre: Juvenile Nonfiction

Do you have much in common with kids from long ago? Sure, their clothes and homes looked different. They ate different food and might not have ever gone to school. But they also made art—just like you. They helped their families with chores—just like you. They played with friends and siblings, and they explored the world around them. Archaeologists know about the lives of children from the past because of what they left behind: toys, tools, clothes, and more. So get ready to travel back in time and check out the lives of kids—from European cave kids twenty thousand years ago to American Indian kids one thousand years ago.

First Peoples in a New World

Author: David J. Meltzer
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520943155
Release Date: 2009-05-27
Genre: Social Science

More than 12,000 years ago, in one of the greatest triumphs of prehistory, humans colonized North America, a continent that was then truly a new world. Just when and how they did so has been one of the most perplexing and controversial questions in archaeology. This dazzling, cutting-edge synthesis, written for a wide audience by an archaeologist who has long been at the center of these debates, tells the scientific story of the first Americans: where they came from, when they arrived, and how they met the challenges of moving across the vast, unknown landscapes of Ice Age North America. David J. Meltzer pulls together the latest ideas from archaeology, geology, linguistics, skeletal biology, genetics, and other fields to trace the breakthroughs that have revolutionized our understanding in recent years. Among many other topics, he explores disputes over the hemisphere's oldest and most controversial sites and considers how the first Americans coped with changing global climates. He also confronts some radical claims: that the Americas were colonized from Europe or that a crashing comet obliterated the Pleistocene megafauna. Full of entertaining descriptions of on-site encounters, personalities, and controversies, this is a compelling behind-the-scenes account of how science is illuminating our past.

The Oxford Handbook of North American Archaeology

Author: Timothy Pauketat
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780190241094
Release Date: 2015-04-01
Genre: History

This volume explores 15,000 years of indigenous human history on the North American continent, drawing on the latest archaeological theories, time-honored methodologies, and rich datasets. From the Arctic south to the Mexican border and east to the Atlantic Ocean, all of the major cultural developments are covered in 53 chapters, with certain periods, places, and historical problems receiving special focus by the volume's authors. Questions like who first peopled the continent, what did it mean to have been a hunter-gatherer in the Great Basin versus the California coast, how significant were cultural exchanges between Native North Americans and Mesoamericans, and why do major historical changes seem to correspond to shifts in religion, politics, demography, and economy are brought into focus. The practice of archaeology itself is discussed as contributors wrestle with modern-day concerns with the implications of doing archaeology and its relevance for understanding ourselves today. In the end, the chapters in this book show us that the principal questions answered about human history through the archaeology of North America are central to any larger understanding of the relationships between people, cultural identities, landscapes, and the living of everyday life.

Images of the Recent Past

Author: Charles E. Orser, Jr.
Publisher: Rowman Altamira
ISBN: 9780759117655
Release Date: 1996-08-15
Genre: Social Science

Historical archaeology has been without a definitive, up-to-date collection that reflects the breadth of the field_until now. Orser's book brings together classic and contemporary articles that demonstrate the development of the field over the last twenty years, both in North America and throughout the world. Orser's selections represent a wide variety of locales and perspectives and include works by many of the leading figures in the field. Engaging articles make it accessible to any interested reader, and superb for historical archaeology classes.

Archaeology Discovering Our Past

Author: Wendy Ashmore
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education
ISBN: 0767427270
Release Date: 2002-07-29
Genre: Social Science

This is the only textbook which is organized to follow the steps of the actual process of archaeological research in order to present the methods and theoretical frameworks of archaeology, from the planning and actual conduct of field research, to the different ways archaeological data is interpreted to produce an understanding of the past. It is also the only such textbook to give the reader a series of firsthand accounts of what its like to do archaeology, written by a variety of practicing archaeologists.

They Lie We Lie

Author: Peter Metcalf
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781134504381
Release Date: 2003-09-02
Genre: Social Science

They Lie, We Lie is an attempt by an experienced fieldworker to engage recent critiques in ethnography, that is the writing of culture, made both from within anthropology and from such disciplines as cultural studies and post-colonial theory. This is necessary because there has been a polarization within anthropology between those who react dismissively to what Marshall Sahlins calls 'afterology' and those who find the critiques so crippling as to make it hard to get on with anthropology at all. Metcalf bridges this divide by analyzing the contradictions of fieldwork in connection with a particular 'informant', a formidable old lady who tried for twenty years to control what he would and would not learn. At each stage, the author draws out the general implications of his predicament by making comparisions to the most famous of all fieldwork relationships, that between Victor Turner and Muchona. The result is an account that is accessible to those unfamiliar with the current critiques of ethnography, and helpful to those who are only too familiar to them. His discussion shows, not how to evade the critiques, but how in fact anthropologists have coped with the existential dilemmas of fieldwork.

Motel of the Mysteries

Author: David Macaulay
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0547348622
Release Date: 1979-10-11
Genre: Young Adult Fiction

It is the year 4022; all of the ancient country of Usa has been buried under many feet of detritus from a catastrophe that occurred back in 1985. Imagine, then, the excitement that Howard Carson, an amateur archeologist at best, experienced when in crossing the perimeter of an abandoned excavation site he felt the ground give way beneath him and found himself at the bottom of a shaft, which, judging from the DO NOT DISTURB sign hanging from an archaic doorknob, was clearly the entrance to a still-sealed burial chamber. Carson's incredible discoveries, including the remains of two bodies, one of then on a ceremonial bed facing an altar that appeared to be a means of communicating with the Gods and the other lying in a porcelain sarcophagus in the Inner Chamber, permitted him to piece together the whole fabric of that extraordinary civilization.

Uncovering the Past

Author: William H. Stiebing
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 9780195089219
Release Date: 1993
Genre: Social Science

When one hears the words "archaeology" or "archaeologist," often what comes to mind is an image of a romantic figure: Indiana Jones exploring exotic places in search of treasure and adventure. Indeed, novels, movies, and many popular accounts of archaeological discoveries have made this concept widespread. Tales of abandoned cities, ruined temples, primeval monuments, or mysterious ancient tombs tend to kindle the urge for adventure, exploration, or treasure hunting that seems to lie beneath the surface of even the most timid and conventional individuals. Today, however, archaeologists seek knowledge rather than objects that are intrinsically valuable. Their ultimate goal is to sweep aside the mists in which time has enveloped the past, helping us to understand vanished peoples and cultures. In Uncovering the Past, William H. Stiebing, Jr. offers an absorbing nontechnical history of archaeology, tracing the study of ancient material culture from its beginnings in the Renaissance through its development into the sophisticated modern discipline we know today. The first study to focus on archaeology as a discipline, Stiebing has organized this concise history into the four stages of archaeological development. The first two stages (1450-1860 and 1860-1925), known as the "heroic age," focus on the exploits of colorful, dynamic excavators who have made their mark on history and our imaginations. We read accounts of Giovanni Belzoni and the removal of the seven-ton colossus of Ramesses II, which was dragged by wooden platform and transported by boat from Egypt to London; we witness the clergyman John Peters's skirmish with Arab tribesmen, who surrounded his excavation site and finally pillaged and burned his camp; and Heinrich Schliemann's quest to prove the authenticity of Homer's Iliad by searching for ancient Troy along the Turkish coast. And we watch as archaeology comes of age as an academic discipline, employing stratigraphical excavation techniques, typographical sequence dating, and stratigraphically based pottery chronology--laying the foundation for universal archaeological activity. The third phase (1925-1960) marked the era of "Modern Archaeology," a time when, using the now generally accepted stratigraphical method of excavation, scholars were able to synthesize data to define individual cultures and trace their development through time. This period saw a greater use of scientific instruments and procedures to locate, date, and interpret remains, such as aerial photography, metal detectors, and most importantly, carbon-14 dating and tree-ring chronology. Lastly, Stiebing discusses the fourth phase of development (1960-present) which introduced a greater desire and need for a more complete understanding of ancient cultures, including their ecology, and attempts to explain why certain cultural phenomena occurred. He goes on to examine the greater emphasis on a cultural revolutionary approach, coupled with technological advances in robotics and computers over the last decade and a half and their commonplace role in modern archaeology. With over eighty photographs, illustrations, and maps, this vivid history is an outstanding introduction to the intriguing field of archaeology, chronicling the development of this former pastime of dilettantes into a rigorous science.