Shapeshifters

Author: Aimee Meredith Cox
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822375371
Release Date: 2015-07-24
Genre: Social Science

In Shapeshifters Aimee Meredith Cox explores how young Black women in a Detroit homeless shelter contest stereotypes, critique their status as partial citizens, and negotiate poverty, racism, and gender violence to create and imagine lives for themselves. Based on eight years of fieldwork at the Fresh Start shelter, Cox shows how the shelter's residents—who range in age from fifteen to twenty-two—employ strategic methods she characterizes as choreography to disrupt the social hierarchies and prescriptive narratives that work to marginalize them. Among these are dance and poetry, which residents learn in shelter workshops. These outlets for performance and self-expression, Cox shows, are key to the residents exercising their agency, while their creation of alternative family structures demands a rethinking of notions of care, protection, and love. Cox also uses these young women's experiences to tell larger stories: of Detroit's history, the Great Migration, deindustrialization, the politics of respectability, and the construction of Black girls and women as social problems. With Shapeshifters Cox gives a voice to young Black women who find creative and non-normative solutions to the problems that come with being young, Black, and female in America.

Shapeshifters

Author: Aimee Meredith Cox
Publisher:
ISBN: 082235943X
Release Date: 2015-08-14
Genre: Social Science

In this ethnography of the Fresh Start homeless shelter in Detroit, Aimee Meredith Cox shows how the shelter's residents—young black women whose average age is twenty—critique their social marginalization and find creative ways to exercise their agency.

Shapeshifters

Author: Aimee Meredith Cox
Publisher:
ISBN: 0822359316
Release Date: 2015-08-14
Genre: Social Science

In this ethnography of the Fresh Start homeless shelter in Detroit, Aimee Meredith Cox shows how the shelter's residents—young black women whose average age is twenty—critique their social marginalization and find creative ways to exercise their agency.

She s Mad Real

Author: Oneka LaBennett
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9780814753125
Release Date: 2011-07-25
Genre: Social Science

Overwhelmingly, Black teenage girls are negatively represented in national and global popular discourses, either as being “at risk” for teenage pregnancy, obesity, or sexually transmitted diseases, or as helpless victims of inner city poverty and violence. Such popular representations are pervasive and often portray Black adolescents’ consumer and leisure culture as corruptive, uncivilized, and pathological. In She’s Mad Real, Oneka LaBennett draws on over a decade of researching teenage West Indian girls in the Flatbush and Crown Heights sections of Brooklyn to argue that Black youth are in fact strategic consumers of popular culture and through this consumption they assert far more agency in defining race, ethnicity, and gender than academic and popular discourses tend to acknowledge. Importantly, LaBennett also studies West Indian girls’ consumer and leisure culture within public spaces in order to analyze how teens like China are marginalized and policed as they attempt to carve out places for themselves within New York’s contested terrains.

Future Girl

Author: Anita Harris
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781135938710
Release Date: 2004-03-01
Genre: Social Science

Anita Harris creates a realistic portrait of the "new girl" that has appeared in the twenty-first century--she may still play with Barbie, but she is also likely to play soccer or basketball, be assertive and may even be sexually aware, if not active. Building on this new definition, Harris explores the many key areas central to the lives of girls from a global perspective, such as girlspace, schools, work, aggression, sexuality and power.

Native Hubs

Author: Renya K. Ramirez
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822340305
Release Date: 2007
Genre: Social Science

An ethnography of urban Native Americans in the Silicon Valley that looks at the creation of social networks and community events that support tribal identities.

Bloomberg s New York

Author: Julian Brash
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 9780820336817
Release Date: 2011
Genre: Social Science

New York mayor Michael Bloomberg claims to run the city like a business. In Bloomberg’s New York, Julian Brash applies methods from anthropology, geography, and other social science disciplines to examine what that means. He describes the mayor’s attitude toward governance as the Bloomberg Way—a philosophy that holds up the mayor as CEO, government as a private corporation, desirable residents and businesses as customers and clients, and the city itself as a product to be branded and marketed as a luxury good. Commonly represented as pragmatic and nonideological, the Bloomberg Way, Brash argues, is in fact an ambitious reformulation of neoliberal governance that advances specific class interests. He considers the implications of this in a blow-by-blow account of the debate over the Hudson Yards plan, which aimed to transform Manhattan’s far west side into the city’s next great high-end district. Bringing this plan to fruition proved surprisingly difficult as activists and entrenched interests pushed back against the Bloomberg administration, suggesting that despite Bloomberg’s success in redrawing the rules of urban governance, older political arrangements—and opportunities for social justice—remain.

Black Feminist Anthropology

Author: Irma McClaurin
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 0813529263
Release Date: 2001
Genre: Social Science

In the discipline's early days, anthropologists by definition were assumed to be white and male. Women and black scholars were relegated to the field's periphery. From this marginal place, white feminist anthropologists have successfully carved out an acknowledged intellectual space, identified as feminist anthropology. Unfortunately, the works of black and non-western feminist anthropologists are rarely cited, and they have yet to be respected as significant shapers of the direction and transformation of feminist anthropology. In this volume, Irma McClaurin has collected-for the first time-essays that explore the role and contributions of black feminist anthropologists. She has asked her contributors to disclose how their experiences as black women have influenced their anthropological practice in Africa, the Caribbean, and the United States, and how anthropology has influenced their development as black feminists. Every chapter is a unique journey that enables the reader to see how scholars are made. The writers present material from their own fieldwork to demonstrate how these experiences were shaped by their identities. Finally, each essay suggests how the author's field experiences have influenced the theoretical and methodological choices she has made throughout her career. Not since Diane Wolf's Feminist Dilemmas in the Field or Hortense Powdermaker's Stranger and Friend have we had such a breadth of women anthropologists discussing the critical (and personal) issues that emerge when doing ethnographic research.

Black Corona

Author: Steven Gregory
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400839315
Release Date: 2011-03-28
Genre: Social Science

In Black Corona, Steven Gregory examines political culture and activism in an African-American neighborhood in New York City. Using historical and ethnographic research, he challenges the view that black urban communities are "socially disorganized." Gregory demonstrates instead how working-class and middle-class African Americans construct and negotiate complex and deeply historical political identities and institutions through struggles over the built environment and neighborhood quality of life. With its emphasis on the lived experiences of African Americans, Black Corona provides a fresh and innovative contribution to the study of the dynamic interplay of race, class, and space in contemporary urban communities. It questions the accuracy of the widely used trope of the dysfunctional "black ghetto," which, the author asserts, has often been deployed to depoliticize issues of racial and economic inequality in the United States. By contrast, Gregory argues that the urban experience of African Americans is more diverse than is generally acknowledged and that it is only by attending to the history and politics of black identity and community life that we can come to appreciate this complexity. This is the first modern ethnography to focus on black working-class and middle-class life and politics. Unlike books that enumerate the ways in which black communities have been rendered powerless by urban political processes and by changing urban economies, Black Corona demonstrates the range of ways in which African Americans continue to organize and struggle for social justice and community empowerment. Although it discusses the experiences of one community, its implications resonate far more widely. Some images inside the book are unavailable due to digital copyright restrictions.

Africanizing Anthropology

Author: Lyn Schumaker
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822326736
Release Date: 2001-07-12
Genre: Social Science

DIVAn innovative cultural study of a major site of British anthropology, done with methods from the history of science, detailing the development of methods, practices, and work culture in the colonial context./div

Citizenship Environment Economy

Author: A. Dobson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781317998648
Release Date: 2013-09-13
Genre: Political Science

This book examines the nature of environmental citizenship, and the obstacles and opportunities involved in trying to develop it in liberal capitalist economies.