Social Inequality in a Global Age

Author: Scott Sernau
Publisher: SAGE Publications
ISBN: 9781483321141
Release Date: 2013-06-25
Genre: Social Science

This fully updated fourth edition of Scott Sernau's highly acclaimed Social Inequality in a Global Age provides a sociological framework for analyzing inequality within the United States in the context of our changing global economy. With vivid examples and insightful analysis, this first-of-its-kind best seller offers students a complete picture of inequality and stratification systems. Using lively writing and examples drawn straight from today's headlines, Sernau explores each issue and dimension of inequality as he analyzes the relationship between global stratification and internal (domestic) systems of inequality. He also introduces both classical and contemporary theories of stratification to help interpret these real-world illustrations. Throughout, a focus on social action and community engagement encourages students to become involved, active learners in the classroom and in their communities.

Social Inequality in a Global Age

Author: Scott Sernau
Publisher: Pine Forge Press
ISBN: 9781412977913
Release Date: 2010-04-28
Genre: Social Science

Worlds Apart: Social Inequality in a Global Age, Third Edition is intended as the primary text for upper-level undergraduate and graduate students who are enrolled in Social Stratification and Inequality courses, primarily taught in Sociology departments. This book focuses primarily on social inequalities in the American context. However, a trend in this course is how the global inequalities are effecting, and affected by social stratification and inequality in America. This edition reflects that trend.

Worlds Apart

Author: Scott Sernau
Publisher: Pine Forge Press
ISBN: 1412915244
Release Date: 2006
Genre: Social Science

This new edition provides a sociological framework for analyzing inequality within United States society as well as analyzing the relationship between global stratification systems and internal systems of inequality. The intersection of race, class and gender is not just stated but illustrated throughout the book as a pervasive institutionalized system of privilege and oppression. Written in a clear style, the author engages undergraduates in the subject matter and also interprets these lived experiences by introducing classical and contemporary theories of stratification.

Collateral Damage

Author: Zygmunt Bauman
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9780745637914
Release Date: 2013-04-16
Genre: Social Science

The term ‘collateral damage' has recently been added to the vocabulary of military forces to refer to the unintended consequences of armed interventions, consequences that are unplanned but nevertheless damaging and often very costly in human and personal terms. But collateral damage is not unique to the world of armed intervention - it is also one of the most salient and striking dimensions of contemporary social inequality. The inflammable mixture of growing social inequality and the rising volume of human suffering marginalized as ‘collateral' is becoming one of most cataclysmic problems of our time. For the political class, poverty is commonly seen as a problem of law and order - a matter of how to deal with individuals, such as unemployed youths, who fall foul of the law. But treating poverty as a criminal problem obscures the social roots of inequality, which lie in the combination of a consumerist life philosophy propagated and instilled by a consumer-oriented economy, on the one hand, and the rapid shrinking of life chances available to the poor, on the other. In our contemporary, liquid-modern world, the poor are the collateral damage of a profit-driven, consumer-oriented society - ‘aliens inside' who are deprived of the rights enjoyed by other members of the social order. In this new book Zygmunt Bauman - one of the most original and influential social thinkers of our time - examines the selective affinity between the growth of social inequality and the rise in the volume of ‘collateral damage' and considers its implications and its costs.

Social Inequality in a Global Age

Author: Scott R. Sernau
Publisher: Sage Publications, Incorporated
ISBN: 1483373975
Release Date: 2016-06-07
Genre: Social Science

Social Inequality in a Global Age, 5th Edition is a main text for upper-level undergraduate courses on Social Stratification and Social Inequality. The book examines systems of inequality in the U.S. based on race, class, gender and sexuality, as well as the dynamics of power and privilege. While the focus is on U.S., Scott Sernau discusses the interplay of systems of inequality in the U.S, and the changing global economy. Other themes in the book are the intersection of race, class, and gender and how it forms a pervasive institutionalized system of privilege and oppression; and the importance of social actors and social change as a way of addressing inequality. Arguments about inequality are supported with data in clear, graphical formats and measures of inequality are explained early in the text.

Studyguide for Social Inequality in a Global Age by Scott Sernau Isbn 9781412977913

Author: Scott Sernau
Publisher: Cram101
ISBN: 146726752X
Release Date: 2012-07
Genre: Education

Never HIGHLIGHT a Book Again! Virtually all of the testable terms, concepts, persons, places, and events from the textbook are included. Cram101 Just the FACTS101 studyguides give all of the outlines, highlights, notes, and quizzes for your textbook with optional online comprehensive practice tests. Only Cram101 is Textbook Specific. Accompanys: 9781412977913 .

Global Inequality

Author: Branko Milanovic
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674737136
Release Date: 2016-04-11
Genre: Business & Economics

"In this fascinating book, Milanovic is able to articulate the study of inequality between and within countries in the clearest possible way. A must-read." Thomas Piketty, Paris School of Economics. "In Global Inequality, Branko Milanovic continues his lifelong investigation into the past, present, and future of inequality, within and between nations, and in the world as a whole. Full of new and provocative ideas - including Kuznets waves and citizenship rents - the book will cement Milanovic's reputation as one of the most thoughtful and enterprising of inequality scholars." Angus Deaton, Princeton University. "Continuing with his extraordinarily important work on the empirics of global inequality, Branko Milanovic in this book expands on that work to lay the basis for a more theoretical understanding of the evolution of inequality. It is seen to be the product of two forces : Kuznets cycles of rising and decreasing within-nation inequalities, and convergence of mean incomes among countries. The relative strength of these two forces has profound political implications : Shall we live in the world of class cleavages, or of huge international income gaps ? Is the world to be ruled by the global top 1 percent or by a large global middle class ?" Joseph Stiglitz, Columbia University.

The Great Leveler

Author: Walter Scheidel
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400884605
Release Date: 2017-01-09
Genre: History

Are mass violence and catastrophes the only forces that can seriously decrease economic inequality? To judge by thousands of years of history, the answer is yes. Tracing the global history of inequality from the Stone Age to today, Walter Scheidel shows that inequality never dies peacefully. Inequality declines when carnage and disaster strike and increases when peace and stability return. The Great Leveler is the first book to chart the crucial role of violent shocks in reducing inequality over the full sweep of human history around the world. Ever since humans began to farm, herd livestock, and pass on their assets to future generations, economic inequality has been a defining feature of civilization. Over thousands of years, only violent events have significantly lessened inequality. The "Four Horsemen" of leveling—mass-mobilization warfare, transformative revolutions, state collapse, and catastrophic plagues—have repeatedly destroyed the fortunes of the rich. Scheidel identifies and examines these processes, from the crises of the earliest civilizations to the cataclysmic world wars and communist revolutions of the twentieth century. Today, the violence that reduced inequality in the past seems to have diminished, and that is a good thing. But it casts serious doubt on the prospects for a more equal future. An essential contribution to the debate about inequality, The Great Leveler provides important new insights about why inequality is so persistent—and why it is unlikely to decline anytime soon.

Gender and International Migration

Author: Katharine M. Donato
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
ISBN: 9781610448475
Release Date: 2015-03-30
Genre: Social Science

In 2006, the United Nations reported on the “feminization” of migration, noting that the number of female migrants had doubled over the last five decades. Likewise, global awareness of issues like human trafficking and the exploitation of immigrant domestic workers has increased attention to the gender makeup of migrants. But are women really more likely to migrate today than they were in earlier times? In Gender and International Migration, sociologist and demographer Katharine Donato and historian Donna Gabaccia evaluate the historical evidence to show that women have been a significant part of migration flows for centuries. The first scholarly analysis of gender and migration over the centuries, Gender and International Migration demonstrates that variation in the gender composition of migration reflect not only the movements of women relative to men, but larger shifts in immigration policies and gender relations in the changing global economy. While most research has focused on women migrants after 1960, Donato and Gabaccia begin their analysis with the fifteenth century, when European colonization and the transatlantic slave trade led to large-scale forced migration, including the transport of prisoners and indentured servants to the Americas and Australia from Africa and Europe. Contrary to the popular conception that most of these migrants were male, the authors show that a significant portion were women. The gender composition of migrants was driven by regional labor markets and local beliefs of the sending countries. For example, while coastal ports of western Africa traded mostly male slaves to Europeans, most slaves exiting east Africa for the Middle East were women due to this region’s demand for female reproductive labor. Donato and Gabaccia show how the changing immigration policies of receiving countries affect the gender composition of global migration. Nineteenth-century immigration restrictions based on race, such as the Chinese Exclusion Act in the United States, limited male labor migration. But as these policies were replaced by regulated migration based on categories such as employment and marriage, the balance of men and women became more equal – both in large immigrant-receiving nations such as the United States, Canada, and Israel, and in nations with small immigrant populations such as South Africa, the Philippines, and Argentina. The gender composition of today’s migrants reflects a much stronger demand for female labor than in the past. The authors conclude that gender imbalance in migration is most likely to occur when coercive systems of labor recruitment exist, whether in the slave trade of the early modern era or in recent guest-worker programs. Using methods and insights from history, gender studies, demography, and other social sciences, Gender and International Migration shows that feminization is better characterized as a gradual and ongoing shift toward gender balance in migrant populations worldwide. This groundbreaking demographic and historical analysis provides an important foundation for future migration research.

Cultural Anthropology A Toolkit for a Global Age

Author: Kenneth J Guest
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393265002
Release Date: 2016-10-11
Genre: Social Science

The Second Edition of Ken Guest's Cultural Anthropology: A Toolkit for a Global Age covers the concepts that drive cultural anthropology by showing that now, more than ever, global forces affect local culture and the tools of cultural anthropology are relevant to living in a globalizing world.

Social Inequality

Author: Louise Warwick-Booth
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 9781446293119
Release Date: 2013-09-30
Genre: Social Science

"What makes this book stand out for me is that, as well as being theoretically informed and clearly written, its structure lends itself unmistakeably to teaching... If our aim is to teach truly engaged students, it should be our job to provide truly engaging materials. This is what you will find with this particular book. It will help to inform your disciplinary teaching of social inequality across the social sciences and it will provide a solid basis for your seminar work with students." - Helen Jones, Higher Education Academy "Warwick-Booth has provided a highly readable introductory text that will be accessible to everyone interested in this area of study, and I highly recommend it for those embarking on studies of social inequality." - LSE Review of Books What is the state of social inequality today? How can you situate yourself in the debates? This is an essential book that not only introduces you to the key areas, definitions and debates within the field, but also gives you the opportunity to reflect upon the roots of inequality and to critically analyse power relations today. With international examples and a clear interdisciplinary approach throughout, the book encourages you to look at social inequality as a complex social phenomenon that needs to be understood in a global context. This book: Looks at social divisions across societies Explores global processes and changes that are affecting inequalities Discusses social inequality in relation to class, gender and race Examines current social policy approaches to explore how these relate to inequality Reflects upon the potential solutions to inequalities This engaging and accessible introduction to social inequality is an invaluable resource for students across the social sciences. Louise Warwick-Booth is Senior Lecturer in Health Policy at Leeds Metropolitan University, UK.

City Power

Author: Richard Schragger
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780190246679
Release Date: 2016-09-01
Genre: Political Science

In 2013, Detroit filed the largest municipal bankruptcy in US history. That dubious honor marked the end of a long decline, during which city leaders slashed municipal costs and desperately sought to attract private investment. That same year, an economically resurgent New York City elected a progressive mayor intent on reducing income inequality and spurring more equitable economic development. Whether or not Mayor Bill de Blasio realizes his legislative vision, his agenda raises a fundamental question: can American cities govern, or are they powerless in the face of global capital? Conventional economic wisdom asserts that cities cannot do very much. Conventional political wisdom asserts that cities should not do very much. In City Power, Richard Schragger challenges both these claims, arguing that cities can govern, but only if we let them. In the past decade, city leaders across America have raised the minimum wage, expanded social services, put conditions on incoming development, and otherwise engaged in social welfare redistribution. These cities have not suffered from capital flight - in fact, many are experiencing an economic renaissance. Schragger argues that the range of city policies is not limited by the requirements of capital, but instead by a constitutional structure that serves the interests of state and federal officials. Maintaining weak cities is a political choice. City Power shows how cities can govern despite constitutional limitations - and why we should want them to. In an era of global capital, municipal power is more relevant than ever to citizen well-being. A dynamic vision of city politics for the new urban age, City Power demonstrates that the city should be at the very center of our economic, legal, and political thinking.

The Family of Man

Author: Gerd Hurm
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 9781786722973
Release Date: 2017-12-18
Genre: Photography

The Family of Man is the most widely seen exhibition in the history of photography. The book of the exhibition, still in print, is also the most commercially successful photobook ever published. First shown at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1955, the exhibition travelled throughout the United States and to forty-six countries, and was seen by over nine million people. Edward Steichen conceived, curated and designed the exhibition. He explained its subject as ‘the everydayness of life' and ‘the essential oneness of mankind throughout the world'. The exhibition was a statement against war and the conflicts and divisions that threatened a common future for humanity after 1945. The popular international response was overwhelmingly enthusiastic. Many critics, however, have dismissed the exhibition as a form of sentimental humanism unable to address the challenges of history, politics and cultural difference. This book revises the critical debate about The Family of Man, challenging in particular the legacy of Roland Barthes’s influential account of the exhibition. The expert contributors explore new contexts for understanding Steichen’s work and they undertake radically new analyses of the formal dynamics of the exhibition. Also presented are documents about the exhibition never before available in English. Commentaries by critical theorist Max Horkheimer and novelist Wolfgang Koeppen, a letter from photographer August Sander, and a poetic sequence on the images by Polish poet Witold Wirpsza enable and encourage new critical reflections. A detailed survey of audience responses in Munich from 1955 allows a rare glimpse of what visitors thought about the exhibition. Today, when armed conflict, environmental catastrophe and economic inequality continue to threaten our future, it seems timely to revisit The Family of Man.

99 to 1

Author: Chuck Collins
Publisher: Berrett-Koehler Publishers
ISBN: 9781609945923
Release Date: 2012
Genre: Political Science

Discusses the wealth gap and its effects on society, including what can be done to remedy the situation and give the one percent a voice.

The Inequality Trap

Author: William Watson
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 9781442624955
Release Date: 2015-09-15
Genre: Business & Economics

US President Barack Obama has called economic inequality the “defining issue of our time.” It has inspired the “Occupy” movements, made a French economist into a global celebrity, and given us a new expression – the “one percent.” But is our preoccupation with inequality really justified? Or wise? In his new book, William Watson argues that focusing on inequality is both an error and a trap. It is an error because much inequality is “good,” the reward for thrift, industry, and invention. It is a trap because it leads us to fixate on the top end of the income distribution, rather than on those at the bottom who need help most. In fact, if we respond to growing inequality by fighting capitalism rather than poverty, we may end up both poorer and less equal. Explaining the complexities of modern economics in a clear, accessible style, The Inequality Trap is the must-read rejoinder to the idea that fighting inequality should be our top policy priority.