Spanish Society 1348 1700

Author: Teofilo F Ruiz
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781351720908
Release Date: 2017-05-25
Genre: History

Beginning with the Black Death in 1348 and extending through to the demise of Habsburg rule in 1700, this second edition of Spanish Society, 1348–1700 has been expanded to provide a wide and compelling exploration of Spain’s transition from the Middle Ages to modernity. Each chapter builds on the first edition by offering new evidence of the changes in Spain’s social structure between the fourteenth and seventeenth century. Every part of society is examined, culminating in a final section that is entirely new to the second edition and presents the changing social practices of the period, particularly in response to the growing crises facing Spain as it moved into the seventeenth century. Also new to this edition is a consideration of the social meaning of culture, specifically the presence of Hermetic themes and of magical elements in Golden Age literature and Cervantes’ Don Quijote. Through the extensive use of case studies, historical examples and literary extracts, Spanish Society is an ideal way for students to gain direct access to this captivating period. ? ? ?

Spain s Centuries of Crisis

Author: Teofilo F. Ruiz
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9781444342703
Release Date: 2011-03-21
Genre: History

A comprehensive history that focuses on the crises of Spain in the late middle ages and the early transformations that underpinned the later successes of the Catholic Monarchs. Illuminates Spain's history from the early fourteenth century to the union of the Crowns of Castile and Aragon in 1474 Examines the challenges and reforms of the social, economic, political, and cultural structures of the country Looks at the early transformations that readied Spain for the future opportunities and challenges of the early modern Age of Discovery Includes a helpful bibliography to direct the reader toward further study

The Sacrament of Penance and Religious Life in Golden Age Spain

Author: Patrick J. O'Banion
Publisher: Penn State Press
ISBN: 9780271060477
Release Date: 2012-11-16
Genre: History

The Sacrament of Penance and Religious Life in Golden Age Spain explores the practice of sacramental confession in Spain between roughly 1500 and 1700. One of the most significant points of contact between the laity and ecclesiastical hierarchy, confession lay at the heart of attempts to bring religious reformation to bear upon the lives of early modern Spaniards. Rigid episcopal legislation, royal decrees, and a barrage of prescriptive literature lead many scholars to construct the sacrament fundamentally as an instrument of social control foisted upon powerless laypeople. Drawing upon a wide range of early printed and archival materials, this book considers confession as both a top-down and a bottom-up phenomenon. Rather than relying solely upon prescriptive and didactic literature, it considers evidence that describes how the people of early modern Spain experienced confession, offering a rich portrayal of a critical and remarkably popular component of early modern religiosity.

Food and Religious Identities in Spain 1400 1600

Author: Jillian Williams
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781351817042
Release Date: 2017-03-16
Genre: Religion

In the late fourteenth century, the Iberian Peninsula was home to three major religions which coexisted in relative peace. Over the next two centuries, various political and social factors changed the face of Iberia dramatically. This book examines this period of dynamic change in Iberian history through the lens of food and its relationship to religious identity. It also provides a basis for further study of the connection between food and identities of all types. This study explores the role of food as an expression of religious identity made evident in things like fasting, feasting, ingredient choices, preparation methods and commensal relations. It considers the role of food in the formation and redefinition of religious identities throughout this period and its significance in the maintenance of ideological and physical boundaries between faiths. This is an insightful and unique look into inter-religious dynamics. It will therefore be of great interest to scholars of religious studies, early modern European history and food studies.

The Terror of History

Author: Teofilo F. Ruiz
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400839424
Release Date: 2011-09-06
Genre: History

This book reflects on Western humanity's efforts to escape from history and its terrors--from the existential condition and natural disasters to the endless succession of wars and other man-made catastrophes. Drawing on historical episodes ranging from antiquity to the recent past, and combining them with literary examples and personal reflections, Teofilo Ruiz explores the embrace of religious experiences, the pursuit of worldly success and pleasures, and the quest for beauty and knowledge as three primary responses to the individual and collective nightmares of history. The result is a profound meditation on how men and women in Western society sought (and still seek) to make meaning of the world and its disturbing history. In chapters that range widely across Western history and culture, The Terror of History takes up religion, the material world, and the world of art and knowledge. "Religion and the World to Come" examines orthodox and heterodox forms of spirituality, apocalyptic movements, mysticism, supernatural beliefs, and many forms of esotericism, including magic, alchemy, astrology, and witchcraft. "The World of Matter and the Senses" considers material riches, festivals and carnivals, sports, sex, and utopian communities. Finally, "The Lure of Beauty and Knowledge" looks at cultural productions of all sorts, from art to scholarship. Combining astonishing historical breadth with a personal and accessible narrative style, The Terror of History is a moving testimony to the incredibly diverse ways humans have sought to cope with their frightening history.

The Avila of Saint Teresa

Author: Jodi Bilinkoff
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801455278
Release Date: 2015-02-17
Genre: History

The Avila of Saint Teresa provides both a fascinating account of social and religious change in one important Castilian city and a historical analysis of the life and work of the religious mystic Saint Teresa of Jesus. Jodi Bilinkoff's rich socioeconomic history of sixteenth-century Avila illuminates the conditions that helped to shape the religious reforms for which the city's most famous citizen is celebrated. Bilinkoff takes as her subject the period during which Avila became a center of intense religious activity and the home of a number of influential mystics and religious reformers. During this time, she notes, urban expansion and increased economic opportunity fostered the social and political aspirations of a new "middle class" of merchants, professionals, and minor clerics. This group supported the creation of religious institutions that fostered such values as individual spiritual revitalization, religious poverty, and apostolic service to the urban community. According to Bilinkoff, these reform movements provided an alternative to the traditional, dynastic style of spirituality expressed by the ruling elite, and profoundly influenced Saint Teresa in her renewal of Carmelite monastic life. A focal point of the book is the controversy surrounding Teresa's foundation of a new convent in August 1562. Seeking to discover why people in Avila strenuously opposed this ostensibly innocent act and to reveal what distinguished Teresa's convent from the many others in the city, Bilinkoff offers a detailed examination of the social meaning of religious institutions in Avila. Historians of early modern Europe, especially those concerned with the history of religious culture, urban history, and women's history, specialists in religious studies, and other readers interested in the life of Saint Teresa or in the history of Catholicism will welcome The Avila of Saint Teresa. First published by Cornell University Press in 1989, this new edition of The Avila of Saint Teresa includes a new introduction by the author.

Isabella

Author: Kirstin Downey
Publisher: Anchor
ISBN: 9780385534123
Release Date: 2014-10-28
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

An engrossing and revolutionary biography of Isabella of Castile, the controversial Queen of Spain who sponsored Christopher Columbus's journey to the New World, established the Spanish Inquisition, and became one of the most influential female rulers in history Born at a time when Christianity was dying out and the Ottoman Empire was aggressively expanding, Isabella was inspired in her youth by tales of Joan of Arc, a devout young woman who unified her people and led them to victory against foreign invaders. In 1474, when most women were almost powerless, twenty-three-year-old Isabella defied a hostile brother and a mercurial husband to seize control of Castile and León. Her subsequent feats were legendary. She ended a twenty-four-generation struggle between Muslims and Christians, forcing North African invaders back over the Mediterranean Sea. She laid the foundation for a unified Spain. She sponsored Columbus's trip to the Indies and negotiated Spanish control over much of the New World with the help of Rodrigo Borgia, the infamous Pope Alexander VI. She also annihilated all who stood against her by establishing a bloody religious Inquisition that would darken Spain's reputation for centuries. Whether saintly or satanic, no female leader has done more to shape our modern world, in which millions of people in two hemispheres speak Spanish and practice Catholicism. Yet history has all but forgotten Isabella's influence, due to hundreds of years of misreporting that often attributed her accomplishments to Ferdinand, the bold and philandering husband she adored. Using new scholarship, Downey's luminous biography tells the story of this brilliant, fervent, forgotten woman, the faith that propelled her through life, and the land of ancient conflicts and intrigue she brought under her command. From the Hardcover edition.

Imprudent King

Author: Geoffrey Parker
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300210446
Release Date: 2014-11-11
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

Philip II is not only the most famous king in Spanish history, but one of the most famous monarchs in English history: the man who married Mary Tudor and later launched the Spanish Armada against her sister Elizabeth I. This compelling biography of the most powerful European monarch of his day begins with his conception (1526) and ends with his ascent to Paradise (1603), two occurrences surprisingly well documented by contemporaries. Eminent historian Geoffrey Parker draws on four decades of research on Philip as well as a recent, extraordinary archival discovery—a trove of 3,000 documents in the vaults of the Hispanic Society of America in New York City, unread since crossing Philip’s own desk more than four centuries ago. Many of them change significantly what we know about the king. The book examines Philip’s long apprenticeship; his three principal interests (work, play, and religion); and the major political, military, and personal challenges he faced during his long reign. Parker offers fresh insights into the causes of Philip’s leadership failures: was his empire simply too big to manage, or would a monarch with different talents and temperament have fared better?

Spanish and Portuguese Literatures and Their Times

Author: Joyce Moss
Publisher: Gale / Cengage Learning
ISBN: 0787637300
Release Date: 2002
Genre: Literary Criticism

Entries on Spanish and Portuguese literary works describe each works' genre, contents, and reflection of real-life events in history and in the author's life.

Trade and Empire in the Atlantic 1400 1600

Author: Professor David Birmingham
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781134573554
Release Date: 2002-01-04
Genre: History

Trade and Empire in the Atlantic 1400-1600 provides an accessible and concise introduction to European expansion overseas during the early modern period. It explains why and how seafarers visited the Caribbean, South America and Africa, and looks at the history of the communities that lived around the ocean as they responded to the challenges and opportunities which sea trade opened for them. Historical thinking on the subject of Empire is naturally controversial as is shown by this survey of the first four stages of early Atlantic colonisation from the conquest of the Canary Islands to the creation of slave plantations in Brazil. This history of the Atlantic Empires is an authoritative introduction to an essential topic in world history.

Spain

Author: Laurie Stoff
Publisher: Greenhaven
ISBN: IND:30000092824550
Release Date: 2004-01
Genre: History

Traces the history of Spain, from prehistoric time to the present.

Great events from history

Author: Christina J. Moose
Publisher: Salem Pr Inc
ISBN: WISC:89090423526
Release Date: 2005-03
Genre: History

The Renaissance & Early Modern Era's start date, 1454, was selected because it immediately follows the end of the Hundred Years? War and the Fall of Constantinople. The following century was marked by the height of the Renaissance in Europe, the rise of the Ottomans and the Wars of the Roses in Britain. Also, European colonization expanded into Africa, Asia and the Americas, Japan became unified and the rise of both indigenous and colonial trade empires in Africa became important. The set discusses major changes in world economics and demographics.

Medieval Europe

Author: Teaching Company
Publisher:
ISBN: 1565858638
Release Date: 1996-01-01
Genre: Civilization, Medieval

History of Europe in the 14th and 15th centuries, first detailing what life was like for peasants, merchants, and monarchs. Illustrates how events such as the Black Death and the Hundred Years' War changed how people viewed themselves, the way they worshipped, and their relationship to land and country.