States Without Nations

Author: Jacqueline Stevens
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231148771
Release Date: 2011-03-01
Genre: Philosophy

As citizens, we hold certain truths to be self-evident: that the rights to own land, marry, inherit property, and especially to assume birthright citizenship should be guaranteed by the state. The laws promoting these rights appear not only to preserve our liberty but to guarantee society remains just. Yet considering how much violence and inequality results from these legal mandates, Jacqueline Stevens asks whether we might be making the wrong assumptions. Would a world without such laws be more just? Arguing that the core laws of the nation-state are more about a fear of death than a desire for freedom, Jacqueline Stevens imagines a world in which birthright citizenship, family inheritance, state-sanctioned marriage, and private land ownership are eliminated. Would chaos be the result? Drawing on political theory and history and incorporating contemporary social and economic data, she brilliantly critiques our sentimental attachments to birthright citizenship, inheritance, and marriage and highlights their harmful outcomes, including war, global apartheid, destitution, family misery, and environmental damage. It might be hard to imagine countries without the rules of membership and ownership that have come to define them, but as Stevens shows, conjuring new ways of reconciling our laws with the condition of mortality reveals the flaws of our present institutions and inspires hope for moving beyond them.

Law without Nations

Author: Jeremy A. Rabkin
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400826608
Release Date: 2009-02-09
Genre: Law

What authority does international law really have for the United States? When and to what extent should the United States participate in the international legal system? This forcefully argued book by legal scholar Jeremy Rabkin provides an insightful new look at this important and much-debated question. Americans have long asked whether the United States should join forces with institutions such as the International Criminal Court and sign on to agreements like the Kyoto Protocol. Rabkin argues that the value of international agreements in such circumstances must be weighed against the threat they pose to liberties protected by strong national authority and institutions. He maintains that the protection of these liberties could be fatally weakened if we go too far in ceding authority to international institutions that might not be zealous in protecting the rights Americans deem important. Similarly, any cessation of authority might leave Americans far less attached to the resulting hybrid legal system than they now are to laws they can regard as their own. Law without Nations? traces the traditional American wariness of international law to the basic principles of American thought and the broader traditions of liberal political thought on which the American Founders drew: only a sovereign state can make and enforce law in a reliable way, so only a sovereign state can reliably protect the rights of its citizens. It then contrasts the American experience with that of the European Union, showing the difficulties that can arise from efforts to merge national legal systems with supranational schemes. In practice, international human rights law generates a cloud of rhetoric that does little to secure human rights, and in fact, is at odds with American principles, Rabkin concludes. A challenging and important contribution to the current debates about the meaning of multilateralism and international law, Law without Nations? will appeal to a broad cross-section of scholars in both the legal and political science arenas.

Law without Nations

Author: Austin Sarat
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 0804777225
Release Date: 2010-12-10
Genre: Law

The possibility of law in the absence of a nation would seem to strip law from its source of meaning and value. At the same time, law divorced from nations would clear the ground for a cosmopolitan vision in which the prejudices or idiosyncrasies of distinctive national traditions would give way to more universalist groundings for law. These alternately dystopian and utopian viewpoints inspire this original collection of essays on law without nations. This book examines the ways in which the growing internationalization of law affects domestic national law, the relationship between cosmopolitan legal ideas and understandings of national identity, and the intersections of identity and law based on the liberal tradition of jurisprudence and transnational influences. Ultimately, Law without Nations offers sharp analyses of the fraught relationship between the nation and the state—and the legal forms and practices that they require, constitute, and violently contest.

Armies Without Nations

Author: Robert H. Holden
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 9780195310207
Release Date: 2006-02
Genre: History

Public violence, a persistent feature of Latin American life since the collapse of Iberian rule in the 1820s, has been especially prominent in Central America. Robert H. Holden shows how public violence shaped the states that have governed Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua. Linking public violence and patrimonial political cultures, he shows how the early states improvised their authority by bargaining with armed bands or montoneras. Improvisation continued into the twentieth century as the bands were gradually superseded by semi-autonomous national armies, and as new agents of public violence emerged in the form of armed insurgencies and death squads. World War II, Holden argues, set into motion the globalization of public violence. Its most dramatic manifestation in Central America was the surge in U.S. military and police collaboration with the governments of the region, beginning with the Lend-Lease program of the 1940s and continuing through the Cold War. Although the scope of public violence had already been established by the people of the Central American countries, globalization intensified the violence and inhibited attempts to shrink its scope. Drawing on archival research in all five countries as well as in the United States, Holden elaborates the connections among the national, regional, and international dimensions of public violence. Armies Without Nations crosses the borders of Central American, Latin American, and North American history, providing a model for the study of global history and politics. Armies without Nations was a CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title for 2005.

Stateless Nations

Author: J. Friend
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9781137008206
Release Date: 2012-05-15
Genre: Political Science

Why are regional nationalisms threatening the old nations? This book explores examples such as why Scotland might become independent, why Wales wants more autonomy, and why Catalonia emphasizes its distinctive language and institutions but does not want separation from Spain. Stateless Nations explores the historical roots of modern nationalisms.

Nation Formation and Social Cohesion

Author: Mapungubwe Institute for Strategic Reflection (MISTRA)
Publisher: Real African Publishers
ISBN: 9781920655747
Release Date: 2014-11-01
Genre: Social Science

The fieldwork and case studies contained in this book were gathered from one-on-one interviews with residents of four of South Africa's nine provinces (Western Cape, Northern Cape, KwaZulu-Natal, and Gauteng). To those living beyond the country's borders, it provides insights into their daily lives and details the problems, frustrations, and hopes of residents of some of the country's most conflicted areas.

State Making in Asia

Author: Richard Boyd
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781134281220
Release Date: 2012-09-10
Genre: Political Science

Including contributions from an international team of leading experts, this volume examines state making from a uniquely Asian perspective and reveals some of the misunderstandings that arise when states and state making are judged solely on the basis of Western history. The contributors argue that if we are to understand states in Asia then we must first recognize the particular combination of institution and ideologies embedded in Asian state making and their distinctiveness from the Western experience. Presenting new empirical and conceptual material based on original research, the book provides a unique theoretical reflection of the state through a thorough comparison of East Asian nations and, as such, will be a valuable resource to scholars of Asian politics and international relations.

Nations without States

Author: Montserrat Guibernau
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9780745666884
Release Date: 2013-07-10
Genre: Political Science

Guibernau offers a comparative analysis of nationalist movements in nations without states.

Rights Across Borders

Author: David Jacobson
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 0801851505
Release Date: 1996
Genre: Political Science

In Rights across Borders, political sociologist David Jacobson asks how transnational migrations have affected our ideas of citizenship and the state since World War II. Jacobson shows how citizenship has been increasingly devalued as governments extend rights to foreign populations and how, in turn, international human rights law has become increasingly important. Analyzing the ideas behind key international documents and discussions on human rights, Jacobson traces the ascendancy of these ideas and shows how they have caused a reexamination of basic notions of citizenship and the nation state. He also explores the implications of these developments for domestic and international politics. Jacobson examines illegal immigration in the United States and migrant and foreign populations in Western Europe, with a special focus on Germany and France. He shows how the differing political cultures of these countries - the ethnic basis of citizenship in Germany versus its political basis in the United States, for instance - have shaped their responses to immigration challenges. Addressing the timely issue of recent large-scale immigration and its impact upon host societies, Rights across Borders offers a lucid and insightful presentation of a difficult and complex issue.

Crafting State Nations

Author: Alfred Stepan
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 9780801897238
Release Date: 2011-01-20
Genre: Political Science

Political wisdom holds that the political boundaries of a state necessarily coincide with a nation's perceived cultural boundaries. This title provides the framework for the state-nation, a paradigm that addresses the need within democratic nations to accommodate distinct groups within a country while maintaining national political coherence.

Where Nation States Come From

Author: Philip G. Roeder
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9780691134673
Release Date: 2007-08-05
Genre: History

Almost all successful nation-state projects have been associated with a particular political institution prior to independence - the segment-state. This text clarifies this link through narrative evidence from Central Eurasia, a rigorous theory, and extensive statistical tests.

Monthly Bibliography

Author: United Nations Library
Publisher: United Nations Publications
ISBN: 9210001702
Release Date: 2010-07-01
Genre: Political Science


Nationalisms

Author: Montserrat Guibernau
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9780745666808
Release Date: 2013-06-10
Genre: Political Science

This is a comprehensive and accessible account of the nature of nationalism, which has re-emerged as one of the fundamental forces shaping world society today.

Decades of Crisis

Author: Ivan T. Berend
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 052092701X
Release Date: 1998-06-12
Genre: History

Only by understanding Central and Eastern Europe's turbulent history during the first half of the twentieth century can we hope to make sense of the conflicts and crises that have followed World War II and, after that, the collapse of Soviet-controlled state socialism. Ivan Berend looks closely at the fateful decades preceding World War II and at twelve countries whose absence from the roster of major players was enough in itself, he says, to precipitate much of the turmoil. As waves of modernization swept over Europe, the less developed countries on the periphery tried with little or no success to imitate Western capitalism and liberalism. Instead they remained, as Berend shows, rural, agrarian societies notable for the tenacious survival of feudal and aristocratic institutions. In that context of frustration and disappointment, rebellion was inevitable. Berend leads the reader skillfully through the maze of social, cultural, economic, and political changes in Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia, Poland, Romania, Bulgaria, Albania, Austria, Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, and the Soviet Union, showing how every path ended in dictatorship and despotism by the start of World War II.

The Nation state in Question

Author: G. D. Ikenberry
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691115095
Release Date: 2003-10-05
Genre: Political Science

Has globalization forever undermined the state as the mighty guarantor of public welfare and security? In the 1990s, the prevailing and even hopeful view was that it had. The euphoria did not last long. Today the "return of the state" is increasingly being discussed as a desirable reality. This book is the first to bring together a group of prominent scholars from comparative politics, international relations, and sociology to systematically reassess--through a historical lens that moves beyond the standard focus on the West--state-society relations and state power at the dawn of the twenty-first century. The contributors examine the sources and forms of state power in light of a range of welfare and security needs in order to tell us what states can do today. They assess the extent to which international social forces affect states, and the capacity of states to adapt in specific issue areas. Their striking conclusion is that states have continued to be pivotal in diverse areas such as nationalism, national security, multiculturalism, taxation, and industrial relations. Offering rich insights on the changing contours of state power, The Nation-State in Question will be of interest to social scientists, students, and policymakers alike. John Hall's introduction is followed by chapters by Peter Baldwin, John Campbell, Francesco Duina, Grzegorz Ekiert, Jeffrey Herbst, Christopher Hood, Anatoly Khazanov, Brendan O'Leary, T. V. Paul, Bernard Yack, Rudra Sil, and Minxin Pei. The conclusion is by John Ikenberry.