Temperance Creek

Author: Pamela Royes
Publisher: Counterpoint
ISBN: 9781619028838
Release Date: 2016-06-01
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

In the early seventies, some of us were shot like stars from our parents’ homes. This was an act of nature, bigger than ourselves. In the austere beauty and natural reality of Hell’s Canyon of Eastern Oregon, one hundred miles from pavement, Pam, unable to identify with her parent’s world and looking for deeper pathways has a chance encounter with returning Vietnam warrior Skip Royes. Skip, looking for a bridge from survival back to connection, introduces Pam to the vanishing culture of the wandering shepherd and together they embark on a four-year sojourn into the wilderness. From the back of a horse, Pam leads her packstring of readers from overlook to water crossing, down trails two thousand years old, and from the vantages she chooses for us, we feel the edges of our own experiences. It is a memoir of falling in love with a place and a man and the price extracted for that love. Written with deep lyricism, Temperance Creek is a work of haunting beauty, fresh and irreverent and rooted in the grit and pleasure of daily life. This is Pam’s story, but the courage and truth in the telling is part of our human experience. Seen through a slower more primary mirror, one not so crowded with objectivity, Pam’s memoir, is a kind of home-coming, a family reunion for shooting stars.

Temperance Creek

Author: Pamela Royes
Publisher:
ISBN: 1619027305
Release Date: 2016-06-14
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

In the early seventies, some of us were shot like stars from our parents’ homes. This was an act of nature, bigger than ourselves. In the austere beauty and natural reality of Hell’s Canyon of Eastern Oregon, one hundred miles from pavement, Pam, unable to identify with her parent’s world and looking for deeper pathways has a chance encounter with returning Vietnam warrior Skip Royes. Skip, looking for a bridge from survival back to connection, introduces Pam to the vanishing culture of the wandering shepherd and together they embark on a four-year sojourn into the wilderness. From the back of a horse, Pam leads her packstring of readers from overlook to water crossing, down trails two thousand years old, and from the vantages she chooses for us, we feel the edges of our own experiences. It is a memoir of falling in love with a place and a man and the price extracted for that love. Written with deep lyricism,Temperance Creek is a work of haunting beauty, fresh and irreverent and rooted in the grit and pleasure of daily life. This is Pam’s story, but the courage and truth in the telling is part of our human experience. Seen through a slower more primary mirror, one not so crowded with objectivity, Pam’s memoir, is a kind of home-coming, a family reunion for shooting stars.

Massacred for Gold

Author: R. Gregory Nokes
Publisher:
ISBN: UCSD:31822037453628
Release Date: 2009
Genre: History

Provides an account of the massacre of over thirty Chinese gold miners on the Oregon side of Hells Canyon, a crime that has remained unsolved since 1887, and provides evidence that indicates the killers were a gang of seven rustlers and schoolboys who were never prosecuted for the murders.

The Great Clod

Author: Gary Snyder
Publisher: Counterpoint
ISBN: 9781619026636
Release Date: 2016-05-01
Genre: Nature

For the full course of his remarkable career, Gary Snyder has continued his study of Eastern culture and philosophies. From the Ainu to the Mongols, from Hokkaido to Kyoto, from the landscapes of China to the backcountry of contemporary Japan, from the temples of Daitokoji to the Yellow River Valley, it is now clear how this work has influenced his poetry, his stance as an environmental and political activist, and his long practice of Zen. Growing up in the Pacific Northwest, Asia became a vocation for Snyder. While most American writers looked to the capitals of Europe for their inspiration, Sndyer looked East. American letters is profoundly indebted to this geographical choice. Long rumored to exist, The Great Clod collects more than a dozen chapters, several published in The Coevolution Quarterly almost forty years ago when Snyder briefly described this work as “The China Book,” and several others, the majority, never before published in any form. “Summer in Hokkaido,” “Wild in China,” “Ink and Charcoal, “ “Stories to Save the World,” “Walking the Great Ridge,” these essays turn from being memoirs of travel to prolonged considerations of art, culture, natural history and religion. Filled with Snyder’s remarkable insights and briskly beautiful descriptions, this collection adds enormously to the major corpus of his work, certain to delight and instruct his readers now and forever.

Walking with Plato

Author: Gary Hayden
Publisher: Oneworld Publications
ISBN: 9781780746579
Release Date: 2016-05-16
Genre: Philosophy

All truly great thoughts are conceived while walking.' So said Friedrich Nietzsche, and so thought philosophy buff Gary Hayden as he set off on Britain’s most challenging trek: to walk from John o’Groats to Land’s End. But it wasn’t all quaint country lanes, picture-postcard villages and cosy bed and breakfasts. Disillusioned after another gruelling day, his feet blistered and his back aching from lugging camping gear, he sought solace in the words of Plato: 'Everything that deceives may be said to enchant.' In this humorous, uplifting and delightfully British tale, Gary finds solitude and weary limbs bring him closer to the wisdom of the world’s greatest thinkers. Recalling Rousseau’s reverie, Bertrand Russell’s misery, Epicurus’ joy in simplicity and Thoreau’s love of the wilderness, Walking with Plato offers a breath of fresh, country air for anyone craving an escape from the humdrum of everyday life.

The Point of Vanishing

Author: Howard Axelrod
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 9780807075470
Release Date: 2015-09-22
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

Named one of the best books of the year by Slate, Chicago Tribune, Entropy Magazine, and named one of the top 10 memoirs by Library Journal Into the Wild meets Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man—a lyrical memoir of a life changed in an instant and of the perilous beauty of searching for identity in solitude On a clear May afternoon at the end of his junior year at Harvard, Howard Axelrod played a pick-up game of basketball. In a skirmish for a loose ball, a boy’s finger hooked behind Axelrod’s eyeball and left him permanently blinded in his right eye. A week later, he returned to the same dorm room, but to a different world. A world where nothing looked solid, where the distance between how people saw him and how he saw had widened into a gulf. Desperate for a sense of orientation he could trust, he retreated to a jerry-rigged house in the Vermont woods, where he lived without a computer or television, and largely without human contact, for two years. He needed to find, away from society’s pressures and rush, a sense of meaning that couldn’t be changed in an instant. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Rumrunning and the Roaring Twenties

Author: Philip Parker Mason
Publisher: Wayne State University Press
ISBN: 0814325831
Release Date: 1995
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

In Rumrunning and the Roaring Twenties, Philip P. Mason provides a fascinating look at the excesses and failures of Prohibition in the United States, and specifically in Michigan.

Fire in the Heart

Author: Mary Emerick
Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing Inc.
ISBN: 9781628728477
Release Date: 2017-09-05
Genre: Nature

FIRE IN THE HEART is a powerful memoir by a woman, once a shy, insecure schoolgirl, who reinvented herself as a professional wildland fire fighter. Determined to forge herself into a stronger, braver person, Mary climbs to new heights for a woman in the field in the 90s, eventually becoming a team commander of a Florida wildfire division. Filled with literal struggles for survival, tough choices and Mary's burning passion for what she does, Fire in the Heart, is an unflinching account of one woman's relationship with fire. But when she loses someone she loves to the famous Storm King Mountain forest fire in Colorado, which killed fourteen firefighters, Mary faces the hardest choice of her life; to stay in the game or turn back and try to find the woman she used to be. It is both a thrilling memoir about life-threatening work and a meditation on identity, strength, bravery, bonds, and survivor's guilt.

Cherokee Messenger

Author: Althea Bass
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806128798
Release Date: 1996
Genre: History

“He is wise; he has something to say. Let us call him ‘A-tse-nu-sti,’ the messenger.” This is the story of Reverend Samuel Austin Worcester (1798-1859), “messenger” and missionary to the Cherokees from 1825 to 1859 under the auspices of the American Board of Foreign Missions (Congregational). One of Worcester’s earliest accomplishments was to set Sequoyah’s alphabet in type so that he and Elias Boudinot could print the bilingual Cherokee Phoenix. After removal to Indian Territory, he helped establish the Cherokee Advocate, edited by William Ross, and issued almanacs, gospels, hymnals, bibles, and other books in the Cherokee, Creek, and Choctaw languages. He served the Cherokee in numerous roles, including those of preacher, teacher, postmaster, legal advisor, doctor, and organizer of temperance societies. His story is the Cherokee story, and in the foreword to this new edition, William L. Anderson discusses Worcester’s life among the Cherokee.

Dark Boundary

Author: Anne Purdy
Publisher: Pickle Partners Publishing
ISBN: 9781787205383
Release Date: 2017-06-28
Genre: History

First published in 1954, this book is an intriguing glimpse into the early days of the Alaskan village of Eagle, along the Yukon River. Anne Purdy, author of bestselling book Tisha, tells the story surrounding the lives of the Eagle Village Indians. She describes the end of the Gold Rush era changes that took place in the early part of the twentieth century, painting a vivid picture of life’s struggles here and of a woman who reaches out to those in desperate need of love and care. A tale of joy and sadness, with a final twist.

Personal Memoirs of a Residence of Thirty Years with the Indian Tribes on the American Frontiers

Author: Henry Rowe Schoolcraft
Publisher:
ISBN: STANFORD:36105010552987
Release Date: 1851
Genre: Indians of North America

This is the autobiographical account of an explorer, government administrator, and scholar whose researches into the language and customs of the Chippewa and other Native American peoples of the Great Lakes region are considered milestones in nineteenth-century ethnography. After a childhood in Hamilton, New York, Schoolcraft gained attention for the reports and journals he wrote on trips west to explore mineral deposits in Arkansas, Missouri, and the old Northwest. Later, he joined the Cass expedition to the Lake Superior region, where he served as an Indian agent in St. Mary (Sault Ste. Marie) from 1822 to 1836. During that time, he continued to make regular exploratory journeys. On one of these, in 1832, he located the Mississippi River's source at Lake Itasca, Minnesota. From 1836 to 1841, Schoolcraft served as Michigan's superintendent of Indian Affairs and helped to bring about a treaty with the Ojibwa (1836), who as a result relinquished their claims to most of northern Michigan. Schoolcraft's memoirs are noteworthy for their detailed geographic, geological, political, military, folkloric, historical, and ethnographic information. Married to a woman of Native American background, he was sympathetic to certain aspects of the Indian societies he encountered. Nevertheless, he saw the sweep of new settlers into Indian lands as inevitable, and accepted as necessary the removal of Native peoples beyond the advancing boundaries of the United States. Schoolcraft believed that soldiers, diplomats, federal officials, and missionaries could do their jobs more effectively if they learned native languages and understood Indian customs. These motives, along with his literary aspirations, gave rise to his explorations of Indian cultural life. He discusses Indian myths and legends at length and talks about how he transformed them into his own Algic Researches (1839), the work that inspired Longfellow's "Hiawatha." Schoolcraft also corresponded or visited with Washington Irving, Thomas Jefferson, Albert Gallatin, and many of the era's other leading intellectuals, and details his conversations with them.

Reports from the Zen Wars

Author: Steve Antinoff
Publisher: Counterpoint
ISBN: 9781619028821
Release Date: 2016-06-01
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

Four decades ago –– aged twenty –– the author experienced what he calls a “negative satori,” a fundamental and irrefutable realization not of enlightenment, but of himself as a predicament only enlightenment could resolve. This, shaped by the hammer blows of a singular American professor, Richard DeMartino, brought him to Zen, and to Japan. Yet over time, of far greater import than his bungling efforts were the wonderful occupants of the Zen world he encountered: Toyoshima-san, the meditation Prometheus whose superhuman efforts astounded and inspired all while he remained impaled on the cliff’s edge; the Thief, chief monastery monk who stole the world from whoever he encountered and whose yawns and the brushing of his teeth shot sparks of Absolute Meaning; Hisamatsu, the great lay Zen Master who at age 16 overheard a doctor tell his mother he’d be dead in six months, only to awaken ten years later and become the most delighted man in Japan; Bunko, the monk kind to others but ferocious with himself, whose daily state of Oneness in meditation left him dissatisfied because despite all exertion he could not crush it to pieces and break beyond it. These are among the sitters for the portraits in Reports From the Zen Wars, Steve Antinoff’s attempt to bear witness to what for him has been The Greatest Show on Earth, price of admission one lotus position.

Pioneer Women

Author: Joanna Stratton
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781476753591
Release Date: 2013-05-28
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

From a rediscovered collection of autobiographical accounts written by hundreds of Kansas pioneer women in the early twentieth century, Joanna Stratton has created a collection hailed by Newsweek as “uncommonly interesting” and “a remarkable distillation of primary sources.” Never before has there been such a detailed record of women’s courage, such a living portrait of the women who civilized the American frontier. Here are their stories: wilderness mothers, schoolmarms, Indian squaws, immigrants, homesteaders, and circuit riders. Their personal recollections of prairie fires, locust plagues, cowboy shootouts, Indian raids, and blizzards on the plains vividly reveal the drama, danger and excitement of the pioneer experience. These were women of relentless determination, whose tenacity helped them to conquer loneliness and privation. Their work was the work of survival, it demanded as much from them as from their men—and at last that partnership has been recognized. “These voices are haunting” (The New York Times Book Review), and they reveal the special heroism and industriousness of pioneer women as never before.

The Evangelicals

Author: Frances FitzGerald
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781439143155
Release Date: 2017-04-04
Genre: Religion

* Winner of the 2017 National Book Critics Circle Award * National Book Award Finalist * Time magazine Top 10 Nonfiction Book of the Year * New York Times Notable Book * Publishers Weekly Best Books of 2017 This “epic history” (The Boston Globe) from Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Frances FitzGerald is the first to tell the powerful, dramatic story of the Evangelical movement in America—from the Puritan era to the 2016 election. “We have long needed a fair-minded overview of this vitally important religious sensibility, and FitzGerald has now provided it” (The New York Times Book Review). The evangelical movement began in the revivals of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, known in America as the Great Awakenings. A populist rebellion against the established churches, it became the dominant religious force in the country. During the nineteenth century white evangelicals split apart, first North versus South, and then, modernist versus fundamentalist. After World War II, Billy Graham attracted enormous crowds and tried to gather all Protestants under his big tent, but the civil rights movement and the social revolution of the sixties drove them apart again. By the 1980s Jerry Falwell and other southern televangelists, such as Pat Robertson, had formed the Christian right. Protesting abortion and gay rights, they led the South into the Republican Party, and for thirty-five years they were the sole voice of evangelicals to be heard nationally. Eventually a younger generation proposed a broader agenda of issues, such as climate change, gender equality, and immigration reform. Evangelicals now constitute twenty-five percent of the American population, but they are no longer monolithic in their politics. They range from Tea Party supporters to social reformers. Still, with the decline of religious faith generally, FitzGerald suggests that evangelical churches must embrace ethnic minorities if they are to survive. “A well-written, thought-provoking, and deeply researched history that is impressive for its scope and level of detail” (The Wall Street Journal). Her “brilliant book could not have been more timely, more well-researched, more well-written, or more necessary” (The American Scholar).

Damn I Shot My Horse

Author: Fred Hauptmann
Publisher: Lulu.com
ISBN: 1329905598
Release Date: 2016-02-17
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

The coming of age story about Fred, a boy who is sent into the desert with very few resources to help build his family's homestead. Many colorful characters come into his life, among them ranchers, prostitutes, miners and other unlikely mentors. Over eleven hard years as a homesteader, hard-rock miner and buckaroo, he learns to live in solitude and keep his emotions in check. Oh, he also learns to dig a ditch.