The Archaeology of American Mining

Author: Paul J. White
Publisher: American Experience in Archaeo
ISBN: 0813054559
Release Date: 2017
Genre: History

Mining was, and remains, a crucial and controversial aspect of America's extracted economies. This monograph explores the various types of mining sites to be found in America. With over 400 years of relevant activity in North America, this overview discusses the broader cultural, social, and economic impacts of this vital industrial development.

The Archaeology of American Cities

Author: Nan A. Rothschild
Publisher:
ISBN: 0813049725
Release Date: 2014-08-01
Genre: Social Science

“Unrivaled in scope. An essential work for urban historical archaeologists.”—Adrian Praetzellis, author ofDug to Death “An engaging and astonishingly comprehensive work that reveals just how much our knowledge of America's cities and the lives of city dwellers has been enriched through urban archaeology.”—Mary C. Beaudry, coeditor ofArchaeologies of Mobility and Movement American cities have been built, altered, redeveloped, destroyed, reimagined, and rebuilt for nearly 300 years in order to accommodate growing and shrinking populations and their needs. Urban archaeology is a unique subfield with its own peculiar challenges and approaches to fieldwork. Understanding the social forces that influenced the development of American cities requires more than digging; it calls for the ability to extrapolate from limited data, an awareness of the dynamics that drive urban development, and theories that can build bridges to connect the two. At the forefront of this exciting field of research, Nan Rothschild and Diana Wall are well suited to introduce this fascinating topic to a broad readership. Following a brief introduction, the authors offer specific case studies of work undertaken in New York, Philadelphia, Tucson, West Oakland, and many other cities. Ideal for undergraduates,The Archaeology of American Cities utilizes the material culture of the past to highlight recurring themes that reflect distinctive characteristics of urban life in the United States.

The Archaeology of Alcohol and Drinking

Author: Frederick Harold Smith
Publisher:
ISBN: 0813032903
Release Date: 2008
Genre: Cooking

From the Publisher: Through its complex history, alcohol has served many cultural functions, often constructive ones. For centuries it has been used as a valuable economic commodity, a medicinal tool, a focus of social gatherings, and a mechanism for psychological escape.

The Archaeology of Institutional Confinement

Author: Eleanor Conlin Casella
Publisher:
ISBN: 0813031397
Release Date: 2007
Genre: History

The study of American institutional confinement, its presumed successes, failures, and controversies, is incomplete without examining the remnants of relevant sites no longer standing. Asking what archaeological perspectives add to the understanding of such a provocative topic, Eleanor Conlin Casella describes multiple sites and identifies three distinct categories of confinement: places for punishment, for asylum, and for exile. Her discussion encompasses the multifunctional shelters of the colonial era, Civil War prison camps, Japanese-American relocation centers, and the maximum-security detention facilities of the twenty-firstcentury. Her analysis of the material world of confinement takes into account architecture and landscape, food, medicinal resources, clothing, recreation, human remains, and personal goods. Casella exposes the diversity of power relations that structure many of America's confinement institutions. Weaving together themes of punishment, involuntary labor, personal dignity, and social identity, The Archaeology of Institutional Confinement tells a profound story of endurance in one slice of society. It will illuminate and change contemporary notions of gender, race, class, infirmity, deviance, and antisocial behavior.

Unearthing Gotham

Author: Anne-Marie E. Cantwell
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300097999
Release Date: 2003-10-01
Genre: History

This book looks at New York from a new perspective, an archaeological one. Describing the exciting discoveries of long lost worlds found beneath the modern metropolis, the authors present a narrative of the many peoples who shared and shaped the land that is now New York City, including nineteenth-century families, Dutch and English colonists, enslaved Africans, and the Native Americans who arrived eleven thousand years ago.

The Archaeology of Clothing and Bodily Adornment in Colonial America

Author: Diana DiPaolo Loren
Publisher:
ISBN: 0813038030
Release Date: 2011-07-01
Genre: Health & Fitness

"Highly readable but also innovative in its approach to a broad array of material from diverse colonial contexts."--Carolyn White, University of Nevada, Reno "Loren brings together a sampling of the extensive literature on the archaeology of clothing and adornment to argue that artifacts of the body acquire their meaning through cultural practice. She shows how dress serves as social discourse and a tool of identity negotiation."--Kathleen Deagan, Florida Museum of Natural History Dress has always been a social medium. Color, fabric, and fit of clothing, along with adornments, posture, and manners, convey information on personal status, occupation, religious beliefs, and even sexual preferences. Clothing and adornment are therefore important not only for their utility but also in their expressive properties and the ability of the wearer to manipulate those properties. Diana DiPaolo Loren investigates some ways in which colonial peoples chose to express their bodies and identities through clothing and adornment. She examines strategies of combining local-made and imported goods not simply to emulate European elites, but instead to create a language of new appearance by which to communicate in an often contentious colonial world. Through the lens of historical archaeology Loren highlights the active manipulation of the material culture of clothing and adornment by people in English, Dutch, French, and Spanish colonies, demonstrating that within Northern American dressing traditions, clothing and identity are inextricably linked.

The Archaeology of American Labor and Working class Life

Author: Paul A. Shackel
Publisher:
ISBN: STANFORD:36105124107702
Release Date: 2009
Genre: Political Science

"Shackel provides a compelling account of how an archaeology of working-class life can correct and enrich historical knowledge and improve public understanding of the American industrial experience."--Dean J. Saitta, University of Denver "A thorough, well-written overview of the issues confronting an archaeology of labor and the contributions historical archaeologists have made in addressing those issues. I would strongly recommend this book for anyone teaching historical archaeology or labor history at the university level."--Stephen A. Mrozowski, University of Massachusetts The winners write history. Thus, it is no surprise that the story of American industrialization is dominated by tales of unbridled technical and social progress. What happens, though, when we take a closer look at the archaeological record? That is the focus of Paul Shackel's new book, which examines labor and working-class life in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century industrial America. Shackel offers an overview of a number of ongoing archaeology projects that are focused on reconstructing the capital-labor relations of the past. He demonstrates that worker unrest has been a constant feature of industrialization, as the fight for fair wages and decent working conditions has been a continual one. He shows how workers resisted conditions through sabotage and how new immigrants dealt with daily life in company housing; he even reveals important information about conditions in strike camps.

The Archaeology of American Capitalism

Author: Christopher N. Matthews
Publisher:
ISBN: 0813044162
Release Date: 2012-12-01
Genre: History

From the publisher. Drawing on archaeological evidence from the colonial period to the modern era and covering sites from New England to California, The Archaeology of American Capitalism is the first comparative treatment in historical archaeology to comprehensively illustrate the development of capitalism in the United States. Included are studies on European-Indian relations, early colonial culture change, urbanization, mass consumption, and heritage tourism that track the emergence to dominance of capitalist social relations. In this wide-ranging and compelling study, Christopher Matthews unravels the complexities of the material construction of individuals as commodities, the orientation of social life to the market, and grassroots resistance to capitalist culture. Perhaps most intriguing, he identifies the discipline of archaeology itself as an artifact of capitalism and offers a thoughtful investigation into the ways in which the transformative effects of capitalism not only determine much of the archaeological record but the pursuit of archaeology itself.

The Texture of Industry

Author: Robert B. Gordon
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0195354826
Release Date: 1997-02-06
Genre: Social Science

While historians have given ample attention to stories of entrepreneurship, invention, and labor conflict, they have told us little about actual work-places and how people worked. Workers seldom wrote about their daily employment. However, they did leave behind their tools, products, shops, and factories as well as the surrounding industrial landscapes and communities. In this book, Gordon and Malone look at the industrialization of North America from the perspective of the industrial archaeologist. Using material evidence from such varied sites as Indian steatite quarries, automobile plants, and coal mines, they examine manufacturing technology, transportation systems, and the effects of industrialization on the land. Their research greatly expands our understanding of industry and focuses attention on the contributions of anonymous artisans whose skills shaped our industrial heritage.

Iowa s Archaeological Past

Author: Lynn Marie Alex
Publisher: University of Iowa Press
ISBN: 1609380150
Release Date: 2010-09-13
Genre: History

Iowa has more than eighteen thousand archaeological sites, and research in the past few decades has transformed our knowledge of the state's human past. Examining the projectile points, potsherds, and patterns that make up the archaeological record, Lynn Alex describes the nature of the earliest settlements in Iowa, the development of farming cultures, the role of the environment and environmental change, geomorphology and the burial of site, interaction among native societies, tribal affiliation of early historic groups, and the arrival and impact of Euro-Americans. In a final chapter, she examines the question of stewardship and the protection of Iowa's many archaeological resources.

The Archaeology of Engagement

Author: Dana Lee Pertermann
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 9781623492953
Release Date: 2015-11-06
Genre: Social Science

When a historic battlefield site is discovered and studied, the focus is often on the “hardware”: remnants of weaponry, ammunition, supplies, and equipment that archaeologists carefully unearth, analyze, conserve, and frequently place on display in museums. But what about the “software”? What can archaeology teach us about the humans involved in the conflict: their social mores and cultural assumptions; their use and understanding of power? In The Archaeology of Engagement: Conflict and Revolution in the United States, Dana L. Pertermann and Holly K. Norton have assembled a collection of studies that includes sites of conflicts between groups of widely divergent cultures, such as Robert E. Lee's mid-1850s campaign along the Concho River and the battles of the River Raisin during the War of 1812. Notably, the second half of the book applies the editors’ principles of conflict event theory to the San Jacinto Battlefield in Texas, forming a case study of one of America's most storied—and heavily trafficked—battle sites.

The Archaeology of Citizenship

Author: Stacey Lynn Camp
Publisher:
ISBN: 0813044596
Release Date: 2013
Genre: Social Science

An examination from an archaeological perspective of how those in power have tried to mold the citizenship and composition of the United States and the various and often conflicting strategies that have been employed to "Americanize" both immigrant and native non-white populations.

The Archaeology of Collective Action

Author: Dean J. Saitta
Publisher:
ISBN: 0813030706
Release Date: 2007
Genre: Social Science

Dean Saitta examines archaeology's success in reconstructing collective social actions of the past - mass protests, labor strikes, slave uprisings on plantations - and considers the implications of such reconstructions for society today. Framing key issues and definitions in a clear and accessible style, Saitta reviews some of the progress archaeologists have made in illuminating race-, gender-, and class-based forms of collective action and how those actions have shaped the American experience. Saitta argues that archaeology is not only a source of historical truth but also a comment on the contemporary human condition.

Motel of the Mysteries

Author: David Macaulay
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0547348622
Release Date: 1979-10-11
Genre: Young Adult Fiction

It is the year 4022; all of the ancient country of Usa has been buried under many feet of detritus from a catastrophe that occurred back in 1985. Imagine, then, the excitement that Howard Carson, an amateur archeologist at best, experienced when in crossing the perimeter of an abandoned excavation site he felt the ground give way beneath him and found himself at the bottom of a shaft, which, judging from the DO NOT DISTURB sign hanging from an archaic doorknob, was clearly the entrance to a still-sealed burial chamber. Carson's incredible discoveries, including the remains of two bodies, one of then on a ceremonial bed facing an altar that appeared to be a means of communicating with the Gods and the other lying in a porcelain sarcophagus in the Inner Chamber, permitted him to piece together the whole fabric of that extraordinary civilization.

Archaeology

Author: David Thomas
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 9780155058996
Release Date: 2005-01-03
Genre: Social Science

This new edition by David Hurst Thomas and Robert L. Kelly pairs two of archaeology's most recognized names--with a combined 70 years of experience--for the first time. David Hurst Thomas of the American Museum of Natural History and Robert L. Kelly of the University of Wyoming bring readers a textbook rich with examples drawn from their experiences leading excavations over the past thirty years. A major revision, this fourth edition of ARCHAEOLOGY reflects the most recent research and changes in the field, while covering the core concepts in an exceptionally student-friendly fashion. This edition continues a tradition of academic rigor and engaging writing style that have made this text one of the most well-respected and best-selling texts in the discipline. The new edition is enhanced with full-color photos and a completely new design. The rich array of supplemental resources includes a new companion website, as well as the option to use a new CD-ROM, DOING FIELDWORK: ARCHAEOLOGICAL DEMONSTRATIONS developed by the authors. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.