The Code Napoleon Or The French Civil Code

Author: France
Publisher: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.
ISBN: 9781584773757
Release Date: 2004
Genre: History

[Spence, George, Translator]. The Code Napoleon; or, the French Civil Code. Literally Translated from the Original and Official Edition, Published at Paris, in 1804, by a Barrister of the Inner Temple. London: Printed for Charles Hunter, Law Bookseller, 1824. xix, 627 pp. Reprinted 2004 by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. LCCN 2003052754. ISBN 1-58477-375-8. Cloth. $120. * Reprint of the second English edition. A comprehensive reformation and codification of the French civil laws, the Code Napoleon was renamed the Civil Code after the Bourbon restoration, and is still in force. It has served as the model for the legal codes of more than twenty nations throughout the world. The French Revolution overturned many of the hundreds of codes of law that had prevailed from ancient times, and added more than 14,000 pieces of legislation. After the National Convention and Directory failed in five attempts to organize this unwieldy mass, Napoleon appointed a commission to draft the new Civil Code. It was enacted in March 21, 1804, after a three year period of 87 sessions. It embodies a typically Napoleonic mix of liberalism and conservatism. Most of the freedoms won by the revolution, such as equality before the law, freedom of religion and the abolition of feudalism were preserved. At the same time, the Code reinforced patriarchal power by making the husband the ruler of the household. According to the Dictionary of National Biography, this work was translated by George Spence [1787-1850], an English jurist and Barrister of the Inner Temple. Dictionary of National Biography XVIII:743.

The Code Napoleon Or the French Civil Code Literally Translated from the Original and Official Edition Published at Paris in 1804 by a Barrister of the Inner Temple

Author:
Publisher:
ISBN: 1616195053
Release Date: 2015-08-31
Genre: Law

Early English translation of the Code Napoleon. xix, 627 pp. Originally published: London: Printed for Charles Hunter, Law Bookseller, 1824. Reprint of the second English edition. A comprehensive reformation and codification of the French civil laws, the Code Napoleon was renamed the Civil Code after the Bourbon restoration, and is still in force. It has served as the model for the legal codes of more than twenty nations throughout the world. The French Revolution overturned many of the hundreds of codes of law that had prevailed from ancient times, and added more than 14,000 pieces of legislation. After the National Convention and Directory failed in five attempts to organize this unwieldy mass, Napoleon appointed a commission to draft the new Civil Code. It was enacted in March 21, 1804, after a three year period of 87 sessions. It embodies a typically Napoleonic mix of liberalism and conservatism. Most of the freedoms won by the revolution, such as equality before the law, freedom of religion and the abolition of feudalism were preserved. At the same time, the Code reinforced patriarchal power by making the husband the ruler of the household. The translator, GEORGE SPENCE [1787-1850], was an English jurist and Barrister of the Inner Temple.

Law s Madness

Author: Austin Sarat
Publisher:
ISBN: UOM:39015058127559
Release Date: 2003-10-21
Genre: Law

DIVA provocative collection of essays that reveals how the law takes its definition from what it excludes /div

Report

Author: State Library of Massachusetts
Publisher:
ISBN: MINN:31951D001203614
Release Date: 1901
Genre:


The Virtuous Marketplace

Author: Victoria Elizabeth Thompson
Publisher:
ISBN: UVA:X004487918
Release Date: 2000
Genre: Business & Economics

"In The Virtuous Marketplace Victoria Thompson explores how this process developed, paying special attention to the changing roles of women in the markets of mid-nineteenth-century Paris. She shows how French women, whose dual economic role as producers and consumers had previously been taken as a matter of course, became the object of a growing fear of the market as a source of social unrest. At the same time, the image of the economically dependent woman became useful to those who demanded higher pay for male "breadwinners." Ultimately, the figure of the prostitute was used to characterize the dangers of the public market, providing the basis for its regulation and for the exclusion of women from it."--BOOK JACKET.