The Corrupting Sea

Author: Peregrine Horden
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISBN: 0631218904
Release Date: 2000-04-07
Genre: History

The Corrupting Sea is a history of the relationship between people and their environments in the Mediterranean region over some 3,000 years. It offers a novel analysis of this relationship in terms of microecologies and the often extensive networks to which they belong.

The Corrupting Sea

Author: Peregrine Horden
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISBN: 0631218904
Release Date: 2000-04-07
Genre: History

The Corrupting Sea is a history of the relationship between people and their environments in the Mediterranean region over some 3,000 years. It offers a novel analysis of this relationship in terms of microecologies and the often extensive networks to which they belong.

The Corrupting Sea

Author: Peregrine Horden
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISBN: 0631218904
Release Date: 2000-04-07
Genre: History

The Corrupting Sea is a history of the relationship between people and their environments in the Mediterranean region over some 3,000 years. It offers a novel analysis of this relationship in terms of microecologies and the often extensive networks to which they belong.

Across the Corrupting Sea

Author: Cavan Concannon
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781317185796
Release Date: 2016-03-17
Genre: History

Across the Corrupting Sea: Post-Braudelian Approaches to the Ancient Eastern Mediterranean reframes current discussions of the Mediterranean world by rereading the past with new methodological approaches. The work asks readers to consider how future studies might write histories of the Mediterranean, moving from the larger pan-Mediterranean approaches of The Corrupting Sea towards locally-oriented case studies. Spanning from the Archaic period to the early Middle Ages, contributors engage the pioneering studies of the Mediterranean by Fernand Braudel through the use of critical theory, GIS network analysis, and postcolonial cultural inquiries. Scholars from several time periods and disciplines rethink the Mediterranean as a geographic and cultural space shaped by human connectivity and follow the flow of ideas, ships, trade goods and pilgrims along the roads and seascapes that connected the Mediterranean across time and space. The volume thus interrogates key concepts like cabotage, seascapes, deep time, social networks, and connectivity in the light of contemporary archaeological and theoretical advances in order to create new ways of writing more diverse histories of the ancient world that bring together local contexts, literary materials, and archaeological analysis.

A Companion to Mediterranean History

Author: Peregrine Horden
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9781118519332
Release Date: 2014-01-21
Genre: History

A Companion to Mediterranean History presents awide-ranging overview of this vibrant field of historical research,drawing together scholars from a range of disciplines to discussthe development of the region from Neolithic times to thepresent. Provides a valuable introduction to current debates onMediterranean history and helps define the field for a newgeneration Covers developments in the Mediterranean world from Neolithictimes to the modern era Enables fruitful dialogue among a wide range of disciplines,including history, archaeology, art, literature, andanthropology

The Mediterranean Context of Early Greek History

Author: Nancy H. Demand
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9781444342345
Release Date: 2011-11-28
Genre: History

The Mediterranean Context of Early Greek History reveals the role of the complex interaction of Mediterranean seafaring and maritime connections in the development of the ancient Greek city-states. Offers fascinating insights into the origins of urbanization in the ancient Mediterranean, including the Greek city-state Based on the most recent research on the ancient Mediterranean Features a novel approach to theories of civilization change - foregoing the traditional isolationists model of development in favor of a maritime based network Argues for cultural interactions set in motion by exchange and trade by sea

Between Evidence and Ideology

Author: Bob E.J.H. Becking
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9789004187375
Release Date: 2010-11-11
Genre: Religion

The essays in this volume deal with the (re)construction of the history of Ancient Israel and how that historywriting is influenced by ideology and informed by the evidence.

The Sea and Civilization

Author: Lincoln Paine
Publisher: Atlantic Books Ltd
ISBN: 9781782393573
Release Date: 2014-02-06
Genre: History

A monumental, wholly accessible work of scholarship that retells human history through the story of mankind's relationship with the sea. An accomplishment of both great sweep and illuminating detail, The Sea and Civilization is a stunning work of history that reveals in breathtaking depth how people first came into contact with one another by ocean and river, and how goods, languages, religions, and entire cultures spread across and along the world's waterways. Lincoln Paine takes us back to the origins of long-distance migration by sea with our ancestors' first forays from Africa and Eurasia to Australia and the Americas. He demonstrates the critical role of maritime trade to the civilizations of ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, and the Indus Valley. He reacquaints us with the great seafaring cultures of antiquity like those of the Phoenicians and Greeks, as well as those of India, Southeast and East Asia who parlayed their navigational skills, shipbuilding techniques, and commercial acumen to establish vibrant overseas colonies and trade routes in the centuries leading up to the age of European overseas expansion. His narrative traces subsequent developments in commercial and naval shipping through the post-Cold War era. Above all, Paine makes clear how the rise and fall of civilizations can be traced to the sea.

The Cambridge World History

Author: Benjamin Z. Kedar
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521190749
Release Date: 2015-04-09
Genre: History

Global history of cross-cultural exchange and conquest, and the accompanying growth of states, religions, knowledge, and economic systems, between 500 and 1500.

The Archaeology of Mediterranean Prehistory

Author: Emma Blake
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9781405137249
Release Date: 2008-04-15
Genre: Social Science

This book offers a comprehensive introduction to the archaeology of Mediterranean prehistory and an essential reference to the most recent research and fieldwork. Only book available to offer general coverage of Mediterranean prehistory Written by 14 of the leading archaeologists in the field Spans the Neolithic through the Iron Age, and draws from all the major regions of the Mediterranean's coast and islands Presents the central debates in Mediterranean prehistory---trade and interaction, rural economies, ritual, social structure, gender, monumentality, insularity, archaeometallurgy and the metals trade, stone technologies, settlement, and maritime traffic---as well as contemporary legacies of the region's prehistoric past Structure of text is pedagogically driven Engages diverse theoretical approaches so students will see the benefits of multivocality

Foundations of Modern International Thought

Author: David Armitage
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521807074
Release Date: 2013
Genre: History

This insightful and wide-ranging volume traces the genesis of international intellectual thought, connecting international and global history with intellectual history.

Tales of the Barbarians

Author: Greg Woolf
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1444390805
Release Date: 2010-12-01
Genre: Literary Criticism

Tales of the Barbarians traces the creation of new mythologies in the wake of Roman expansion westward to the Atlantic, and offers the first application of modern ethnographic theory to ancient material. Investigates the connections between empire and knowledge at the turn of the millennia, and the creation of new histories in the Roman West Explores how ancient geography, local histories and the stories of wandering heroes were woven together by Greek scholars and local experts Offers a fresh perspective by examining passages from ancient writers in a new light

Rome

Author: Greg Woolf
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199972173
Release Date: 2012-07-10
Genre: History

The very idea of empire was created in ancient Rome and even today traces of its monuments, literature, and institutions can be found across Europe, the Near East, and North Africa--and sometimes even further afield. In Rome, historian Greg Woolf expertly recounts how this mammoth empire was created, how it was sustained in crisis, and how it shaped the world of its rulers and subjects--a story spanning a millennium and a half of history. The personalities and events of Roman history have become part of the West's cultural lexicon, and Woolf provides brilliant retellings of each of these, from the war with Carthage to Octavian's victory over Cleopatra, from the height of territorial expansion under the emperors Trajan and Hadrian to the founding of Constantinople and the barbarian invasions which resulted in Rome's ultimate collapse. Throughout, Woolf carefully considers the conditions that made Rome's success possible and so durable, covering topics as diverse as ecology, slavery, and religion. Woolf also compares Rome to other ancient empires and to its many later imitators, bringing into vivid relief the Empire's most distinctive and enduring features. As Woolf demonstrates, nobody ever planned to create a state that would last more than a millennium and a half, yet Rome was able, in the end, to survive barbarian migrations, economic collapse and even the conflicts between a series of world religions that had grown up within its borders, in the process generating an image and a myth of empire that is apparently indestructible. Based on new research and compellingly told, this sweeping account promises to eclipse all previously published histories of the empire.