End of the Roman Republic 146 to 44 BC Conquest and Crisis

Author: Catherine Steel
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 9780748629022
Release Date: 2013-03-05
Genre: History

In 146 BC the armies of Rome destroyed Carthage and emerged as the decisive victors of the Third Punic War. The Carthaginian population was sold and its territory became the Roman province of Africa. In the same year and on the other side of the Mediterranean Roman troops sacked Corinth, the final blow in the defeat of the Achaean conspiracy: thereafter Greece was effectively administered by Rome. Rome was now supreme in Italy, the Balkans, Greece, Macedonia, Sicily, and North Africa, and its power and influence were advancing in all directions. However, not all was well. The unchecked seizure of huge tracts of land in Italy and its farming by vast numbers of newly imported slaves allowed an elite of usually absentee landlords to amass enormous and conspicuous fortunes. Insecurity and resentment fed the gulf between rich and poor in Rome and erupted in a series of violent upheavals in the politics and institutions of the Republic. These were exacerbated by slave revolts and invasions from the east.

SPQR A History of Ancient Rome

Author: Mary Beard
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9781631491252
Release Date: 2015-11-09
Genre: History

New York Times Bestseller • National Book Critics Circle Finalist • Wall Street Journal Best Books of 2015 • Kirkus Reviews Best Books of 2015 • Economist Books of the Year 2015 • New York Times Book Review 100 Notable Books of 2015 A sweeping, "magisterial" history of the Roman Empire from one of our foremost classicists shows why Rome remains "relevant to people many centuries later" (Atlantic). In SPQR, an instant classic, Mary Beard narrates the history of Rome "with passion and without technical jargon" and demonstrates how "a slightly shabby Iron Age village" rose to become the "undisputed hegemon of the Mediterranean" (Wall Street Journal). Hailed by critics as animating "the grand sweep and the intimate details that bring the distant past vividly to life" (Economist) in a way that makes "your hair stand on end" (Christian Science Monitor) and spanning nearly a thousand years of history, this "highly informative, highly readable" (Dallas Morning News) work examines not just how we think of ancient Rome but challenges the comfortable historical perspectives that have existed for centuries. With its nuanced attention to class, democratic struggles, and the lives of entire groups of people omitted from the historical narrative for centuries, SPQR will to shape our view of Roman history for decades to come.

Rome and the Mediterranean 290 to 146 BC The Imperial Republic

Author: Nathan Rosenstein
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 9780748629992
Release Date: 2012-03-01
Genre: History

A compelling account of how Rome became supreme power in Europe and the Mediterranean world. The book highlights the significance of Rome's success in the wars against Pyrrhys, Carhage, the Hellenistic kingdoms and in Spain that led to empire, and it shows how the Republic's success in conquering an empire changed the conquerors.It is unusual in focusing on a discrete, vital period in Roman history rather than attempting to cover all of it or even just the Republic.

Cicero

Author: Gesine Manuwald
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 9780857735157
Release Date: 2014-11-28
Genre: Philosophy

Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 BCE) introduced Romans to the major schools of Greek philosophy, forging a Latin conceptual vocabulary that was entirely new. But for all the sophistication of his thinking, it is perhaps for his political and oratorical career that Cicero is best remembered. He was the nemesis of Catiline, whose plot to overthrow the Republic he famously denounced to the Senate. He was the selfless Consul who turned down the opportunity to join Julius Caesar and Pompey in their ruling triumvirate with Crassus. He was briefly Rome’s leading man after Caesar’s assassination in 44 BCE. And he was the indecisive schemer whose personal ambitions and bitter rivalry with Mark Antony led to his own violent death in 43 BCE as an enemy of the state. In her authoritative survey, Gesine Manuwald evokes the many faces of Cicero, as well as his complexities and seeming contradictions. She focuses on his major writings, allowing the great rhetorician to speak for himself. Cicero’s rich legacy is seen to endure in the works of Plutarch and Quintilian as well as in the speeches of Winston Churchill and Barack Obama.

Augustan Rome 44 BC to AD 14 The Restoration of the Republic and the Establishment of the Empire

Author: J. S. Richardson
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 9780748629046
Release Date: 2012-03-28
Genre: History

Centring on the reign of the emperor Augustus, volume four is pivotal to the series, tracing of the changing shape of the entity that was ancient Rome through its political, cultural and economic history. Within this period the Roman world was reconfigured. On a political and constitutional level the patterns of the republic, which sustained an oligarchic regime and a popularist structure, were transformed into a monarchical dictatorship in which the earlier elements continued to function. On an imperial level, the growth in Roman power reached what was virtually its apogee. In literature and the visual arts, new forms of expression, based on those of the previous generations but closely linked to the new regime, showed great achievements. In society and the economy, the effectiveness and dominance of Rome as the centre of world power became increasingly obvious.

Imperial Rome AD 284 to 363

Author: Jill Harries
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 9780748653959
Release Date: 2012-03-07
Genre: History

This book is about the reinvention of the Roman Empire during the eighty years between the accession of Diocletian and the death of Julian.

From Rome to Byzantium AD 363 to 565

Author: A. D Lee
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 9780748668359
Release Date: 2013-01-15
Genre: History

A. D. Lee charts the significant developments which marked the transformation of Ancient Rome into medieval Byzantium.

Triumphs in the Age of Civil War

Author: Carsten Hjort Lange
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 9781474267854
Release Date: 2016-08-11
Genre: History

Many of the wars of the Late Republic were largely civil conflicts. There was, therefore, a tension between the traditional expectation that triumphs should be celebrated for victories over foreign enemies and the need of the great commanders to give full expression to their prestige and charisma, and to legitimize their power. Triumphs in the Age of Civil War rethinks the nature and the character of the phenomenon of civil war during the Late Republic. At the same time it focuses on a key feature of the Roman socio-political order, the triumph, and argues that a commander could in practice expect to triumph after a civil war victory if it could also be represented as being over a foreign enemy, even if the principal opponent was clearly Roman. Significantly, the civil aspect of the war did not have to be denied. Carsten Hjort Lange provides the first study to consider the Roman triumph during the age of civil war, and argues that the idea of civil war as "normal" reflects the way civil war permeated the politics and society of the Late Roman Republic.

Reading Republican Oratory

Author: Christa Gray
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780198788201
Release Date: 2018-02-22
Genre: Language Arts & Disciplines

Public speech was a key aspect of politics in Republican Rome, both in theory and in practice, and recent decades have seen a surge in scholarly discussion of its significance and performance. Yet the partial nature of the surviving evidence means that our understanding of its workings is dominated by one man, whose texts are the only examples to have survived in complete form since antiquity: Cicero. This collection of essays aims to broaden our conception of the oratory of the Roman Republic by exploring how it was practiced by individuals other than Cicero, whether major statesmen, jobbing lawyers, or, exceptionally, the wives of politicians. It focuses particularly on the surviving fragments of such oratory, with individual essays tackling the challenges posed both by the partial and often unreliable nature of the evidence about these other Roman orators-often known to us chiefly through the tendentious observations of Cicero himself-and the complex intersections of the written fragments and the oral phenomenon. Collectively, the essays are concerned with the methods by which we are able to reconstruct non-Ciceronian oratory and the exploration of new ways of interpreting this evidence to tell us about the content, context, and delivery of those speeches. They are arranged into two thematic Parts, the first addressing questions of reception, selection, and transmission, and the second those of reconstruction, contextualization, and interpretation: together they represent a comprehensive overview of the non-Ciceronian speeches that will be of use to all ancient historians, philologists, and literary classicists with an interest in the oratory of the Roman Republic.