The Forest People

Author: Colin Turnbull
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 9781473524170
Release Date: 2015-10-01
Genre: Social Science

The Forest People is an astonishingly intimate and life-enhancing account of a hunter-gatherer tribe living in harmony with nature -- and an all-time classic of anthropology. For three years, Colin Turnbull lived with an isolated group of Pygmies deep in the forest of the African Congo, experiencing their daily life first-hand. He attended their hunting parties and initiation ceremonies, witnessed their music and their rituals, observed their quarrels and love affairs. He documented them as an anthropologist but was accepted among them as a friend. A ground-breaking work in its time, The Forest People made him one of the most famous intellectuals of the 1960s and 1970s. It remains a transporting account of an earthly paradise and of a legendary and fascinating people. With a new foreword by Horatio Clare.

Among the Forest People

Author: Clara Dillingham Pierson
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781625589347
Release Date: 2013-04-12
Genre: Juvenile Fiction

Among the Forest People includes nineteen charming tales about the everyday life of the forest creatures. The tales are told in such a manner that they seem realistic, and are not only entertaining, but educational.

The Forest People without a Forest

Author: Glory M. Lueong
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 9781785333811
Release Date: 2016-12-30
Genre: Social Science

Development interventions often generate contradictions around questions of who benefits from development and which communities are targeted for intervention. This book examines how the Baka, who live in Eastern Cameroon, assert forms of belonging in order to participate in development interventions, and how community life is shaped and reshaped through these interventions. Often referred to as 'forest people', the Baka have witnessed many recent development interventions that include competing and contradictory policies such as 'civilize', assimilate and integrate the Baka into 'full citizenship', conserve the forest and wildlife resources, and preserve indigenous cultures at the verge of extinction.

Mountain People

Author: Colin Turnbull
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9780671640989
Release Date: 1987-07-02
Genre: Social Science

In "The Mountain People," Colin The Forest People" - describes the dehumanization of the Ik, African tribesmen who in less than three generations have deteriorated from being once-prosperous hunters to scattered bands of hostile, starving people whose only goal is individual survival. Forbidden by the Ugandan government to hunt game in the Kidepo National Park, the Ik are compelled to farm and forage for food in the barren mountain heights adjoining the park. Drought and starvation have made them a strange and heartless people, mistrustful of their own kind - their days occupied with constant competition and the search for food. Isolated from one another, each family is separated in its own compound within the village's fortress walls. And each family is itself divided: husbands, wives, and children remorselessly avoid helping one another find food. Sad, disturbing, and eloquently written, "The Mountain People" is a moving meditation on human nature, our capacity for goodness, and the fragility of human society. It is a brilliant, modern classic of anthropology.

Chameleon

Author: Maggie Faire
Publisher: Maggie Lynch
ISBN: 9781940064000
Release Date: 2013-05-30
Genre: Fiction

Camryn Painter is a 16-year-old freak of nature. Or possibly the savior of a civilization that isn't supposed to exist. She's a human chameleon... one who transforms into the image of whoever sees. Escaping from a medical research facility, Camryn discovers a magical forest world. Not that she's welcome. Her new home is filled with faeries and beasts set on destroying her. Striking a tribal alliance between what she once believed were mythical beings is her only chance of survival... if she can just control her power and figure out who to trust.

Chameleon The Choosing

Author: Maggie Faire
Publisher: Windtree Press
ISBN: 9781940064024
Release Date: 2013-07-05
Genre: Fiction

Book Two of the Forest People Camryn Painter’s powers come at a steep price. It’s one thing to master her chameleon abilities in the ancient forest world she now calls home, but another to use her abilities wisely. With the life or death of an entire civilization in her hands, Camryn must bond with a thunder dragon and join a battle she has little chance of winning… unless she can face down her own inner demons without destroying those she loves.

The Little People in the Forest

Author: Doris Wright Garrett
Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
ISBN: 9781477162040
Release Date: 2007-09-17
Genre: Juvenile Fiction

Meet the NeeNy Haired Family. The tiniest family of forest people anywhere. Because of their small size and shiny skin, they are really cute and chased away from their home. Can they ever find a place where they can truly belong? A nice warm place to call home. Follow their fascinating journey in the little people in the forest. A delightful picturebook by Doris Wright Garrett.

Visits from the Forest People

Author: Julie Scott
Publisher: Pine Winds Press
ISBN: 0937663190
Release Date: 2011-01-01
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

Julie Scott and the rest of the Scott family report on their experiences in Western Washington while sharing the forest surrounding their home with a group of Bigfoot, which Scott calls Forest People. The reports include several sightings and other evidence, interactions between the Scott family and the Forest People, and, amusingly, Bigfoot's uncanny ability to avoid being photographed despite the extensive efforts of a team of Bigfoot researchers. Julie includes her thoughts about the origins of Bigfoot, explanations for some of the difficulties in collecting evidence of Bigfoot, thoughts about the current state of Bigfoot research, and suggestions for establishing more effective communication between Bigfoot and humans.

Forest People Interfaces

Author: Bas Arts
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9789086867493
Release Date: 2012-05-22
Genre: Science

This book aims at both academics and professionals in the field of forest-people interfaces. It takes the reader on a journey through four major themes that have emerged since the initiation of 'social forestry' in the 1970s: non-timber forest products and agroforestry; community-based natural resource management; biocultural diversity; and forest governance. In so doing, the books offers a comprehensive and current review on social issues related to forests that other, more specialized publications, lack. It is also theory-rich, offering both mainstream and critical perspectives, and presents up-to-date empirical materials. Reviewing these four major research themes, the main conclusion of the book is that naïve optimism associated with forest-people interfaces should be tempered. The chapters show that economic development, political empowerment and environmental aims are not easily integrated. Hence local landscapes and communities are not as 'makeable' as is often assumed. Events that take place on other scales might intervene; local communities might not implement policies locally; and governance practices might empower governments more than communities. This all shows that we should go beyond community-based ideas and ideals, and look at practices on the ground.

Forest people Interfaces

Author: Bas Arts
Publisher: Wageningen Academic Pub
ISBN: 9789086861934
Release Date: 2012
Genre: Social Science

This book aims at both academics and professionals in the field of forest-people interfaces. It takes the reader on a journey through four major themes that have emerged since the initiation of 'social forestry' in the 1970s: non-timber forest products and agroforestry; community-based natural resource management; biocultural diversity; and forest governance. In so doing, the books offers a comprehensive and current review on social issues related to forests that other, more specialized publications, lack. It is also theory-rich, offering both mainstream and critical perspectives, and presents up-to-date empirical materials.Reviewing these four major research themes, the main conclusion of the book is that naïve optimism associated with forest-people interfaces should be tempered. The chapters show that economic development, political empowerment and environmental aims are not easily integrated. Hence local landscapes and communities are not as 'makeable' as is often assumed. Events that take place on other scales might intervene; local communities might not implement policies locally; and governance practices might empower governments more than communities. This all shows that we should go beyond community-based ideas and ideals, and look at practices on the ground.

In Place of the Forest Environmental and Socio Economic Transformation in Borneo and the Eastern Malay Peninsula

Author: Brookfield, Harold
Publisher: United Nations University Press
ISBN: 9280808931
Release Date: 1995
Genre: Business & Economics

This book describes the modern transformation of Borneo and the eastern side of the Malay Peninsula, an area considered to be "environmentally critical" because of the massive deforestation that has taken place there since the 1960s. The conclusions indicate that great dangers arise from national policies that continue to treat this region as a "resource frontier" despite its growing resource scarcity.

Shifting Cultivation and Environmental Change

Author: Malcolm F. Cairns
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781317750185
Release Date: 2015-01-09
Genre: Nature

Shifting cultivation is one of the oldest forms of subsistence agriculture and is still practised by millions of poor people in the tropics. Typically it involves clearing land (often forest) for the growing of crops for a few years, and then moving on to new sites, leaving the earlier ground fallow to regain its soil fertility. This book brings together the best of science and farmer experimentation, vividly illustrating the enormous diversity of shifting cultivation systems as well as the power of human ingenuity. Some critics have tended to disparage shifting cultivation (sometimes called 'swidden cultivation' or 'slash-and-burn agriculture') as unsustainable due to its supposed role in deforestation and land degradation. However, the book shows that such indigenous practices, as they have evolved over time, can be highly adaptive to land and ecology. In contrast, 'scientific' agricultural solutions imposed from outside can be far more damaging to the environment and local communities. The book focuses on successful agricultural strategies of upland farmers, particularly in south and south-east Asia, and presents over 50 contributions by scholars from around the world and from various disciplines, including agricultural economics, ecology and anthropology. It is a sequel to the much praised "Voices from the Forest: Integrating Indigenous Knowledge into Sustainable Upland Farming" (RFF Press, 2007), but all chapters are completely new and there is a greater emphasis on the contemporary challenges of climate change and biodiversity conservation.

The Maya Tropical Forest

Author: James D. Nations
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 9780292778771
Release Date: 2010-01-01
Genre: Nature

The Maya Tropical Forest, which occupies the lowlands of southern Mexico, Guatemala, and Belize, is the closest rainforest to the United States and one of the most popular tourist destinations in the Western Hemisphere. It has been home to the Maya peoples for nearly four millennia, starting around 1800 BC. Ancient cities in the rainforest such as Palenque, Yaxchilan, Tikal, and Caracol draw thousands of tourists and scholars seeking to learn more about the prehistoric Maya. Their contemporary descendants, the modern Maya, utilize the forest's natural resources in village life and international trade, while striving to protect their homeland from deforestation and environmental degradation. Writing for both visitors and conservationists, James Nations tells the fascinating story of how ancient and modern Maya peoples have used and guarded the rich natural resources of the Maya Tropical Forest. He opens with a natural history that profiles the forest's significant animals and plants. Nations then describes the Maya peoples, biological preserves, and major archaeological sites in Mexico, Guatemala, and Belize. Drawing on more than twenty-five years of conservation work in the Maya Tropical Forest, Nations tells first-hand stories of the creation of national parks and other protected areas to safeguard the region's natural resources and archaeological heritage. He concludes with an expert assessment of the forest's future in which he calls for expanded archaeological tourism to create an ecologically sustainable economic base for the region.