The Forest People

Author: Colin Turnbull
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 9781473524170
Release Date: 2015-10-01
Genre: Social Science

The Forest People is an astonishingly intimate and life-enhancing account of a hunter-gatherer tribe living in harmony with nature -- and an all-time classic of anthropology. For three years, Colin Turnbull lived with an isolated group of Pygmies deep in the forest of the African Congo, experiencing their daily life first-hand. He attended their hunting parties and initiation ceremonies, witnessed their music and their rituals, observed their quarrels and love affairs. He documented them as an anthropologist but was accepted among them as a friend. A ground-breaking work in its time, The Forest People made him one of the most famous intellectuals of the 1960s and 1970s. It remains a transporting account of an earthly paradise and of a legendary and fascinating people. With a new foreword by Horatio Clare.

Visits from the Forest People

Author: Julie Scott
Publisher: Pine Winds Press
ISBN: 0937663190
Release Date: 2011-01-01
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

Julie Scott and the rest of the Scott family report on their experiences in Western Washington while sharing the forest surrounding their home with a group of Bigfoot, which Scott calls Forest People. The reports include several sightings and other evidence, interactions between the Scott family and the Forest People, and, amusingly, Bigfoot's uncanny ability to avoid being photographed despite the extensive efforts of a team of Bigfoot researchers. Julie includes her thoughts about the origins of Bigfoot, explanations for some of the difficulties in collecting evidence of Bigfoot, thoughts about the current state of Bigfoot research, and suggestions for establishing more effective communication between Bigfoot and humans.

The Forest People without a Forest

Author: Glory M. Lueong
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 9781785333811
Release Date: 2016-12-30
Genre: Social Science

Development interventions often generate contradictions around questions of who benefits from development and which communities are targeted for intervention. This book examines how the Baka, who live in Eastern Cameroon, assert forms of belonging in order to participate in development interventions, and how community life is shaped and reshaped through these interventions. Often referred to as 'forest people', the Baka have witnessed many recent development interventions that include competing and contradictory policies such as 'civilize', assimilate and integrate the Baka into 'full citizenship', conserve the forest and wildlife resources, and preserve indigenous cultures at the verge of extinction.

Yanomami

Author: William Milliken
Publisher: Royal Botanic Gardens Kew
ISBN: UTEXAS:059173008336338
Release Date: 1999
Genre: Science

A highly readable book about the remarkable relationship between a forest people and their environment — the watershed between the Brazilian Amazon and the Venezuelan Orinoco. It provides a fascinating insight into their culture and intricate knowledge of plants, animals and the ecology of the environment in which they live.

Mountain People

Author: Colin Turnbull
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9780671640989
Release Date: 1987-07-02
Genre: Social Science

In "The Mountain People," Colin The Forest People" - describes the dehumanization of the Ik, African tribesmen who in less than three generations have deteriorated from being once-prosperous hunters to scattered bands of hostile, starving people whose only goal is individual survival. Forbidden by the Ugandan government to hunt game in the Kidepo National Park, the Ik are compelled to farm and forage for food in the barren mountain heights adjoining the park. Drought and starvation have made them a strange and heartless people, mistrustful of their own kind - their days occupied with constant competition and the search for food. Isolated from one another, each family is separated in its own compound within the village's fortress walls. And each family is itself divided: husbands, wives, and children remorselessly avoid helping one another find food. Sad, disturbing, and eloquently written, "The Mountain People" is a moving meditation on human nature, our capacity for goodness, and the fragility of human society. It is a brilliant, modern classic of anthropology.

The Light in the Forest

Author: Conrad Richter
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 9780804151016
Release Date: 2013-08-07
Genre: Juvenile Fiction

An adventurous story of a frontier boy raised by Indians, The Light in the Forest is a beloved American classic. When John Cameron Butler was a child, he was captured in a raid on the Pennsylvania frontier and adopted by the great warrrior Cuyloga. Renamed True Son, he came to think of himself as fully Indian. But eleven years later his tribe, the Lenni Lenape, has signed a treaty with the white men and agreed to return their captives, including fifteen-year-old True Son. Now he must go back to the family he has forgotten, whose language is no longer his, and whose ways of dress and behavior are as strange to him as the ways of the forest are to them. From the Paperback edition.

Children of the Forest

Author: Kevin Duffy
Publisher: Waveland Press
ISBN: 9781478608585
Release Date: 1995-12-06
Genre: Social Science

This intimate study portrays the hunter-gatherer Mbuti pygmies of Zaire. Kevin Duffy describes how these forest nomads, who are as adapted to the forest as its wildlife, gratefully acknowledge their beloved home as the source of everything they need: food, clothing, shelter, and affection. Looking on the forest in deified terms, they sing and pray to it and call themselves its children. With his patience and knowledge of their ways, Duffy was accepted by these, the worlds smallest people, and invited to participate in the cycle of their lives from birth to death.

Song from the Forest

Author: Louis Sarno
Publisher: Trinity University Press
ISBN: 9781595347497
Release Date: 2015-04-07
Genre: Social Science

As a young man, American Louis Sarno heard a song on the radio that gripped his imagination. With some funding from musician Brian Eno, he followed the mysterious sounds all the way to the Central African rain forest and found their source with the Bayaka Pygmies, a tribe of hunters and gatherers. Nothing could have prepared him for life among the Pygmies, a people legendary for their short stature and musical wealth. Sarno never left. Considered outwardly lazy by some, scrounging, and near alcoholic, the Pygmies Sarno met had seemingly lost all desire to hunt or make music. Only after he had lived with them for some time (on a diet of tadpoles) was he allowed to join them in the rain forest where they still in relative harmony with nature. There Sarno experienced the extraordinary beauty and spiritual sophistication of their culture and the supreme importance of music as the principal means by which they communicate with the rain forest and its magical spirits. Over the decades Sarno has recorded more than 1,000 hours of unique Bayaka music. He is a fully accepted member of the Bayaka society and married a Bayaka woman. Permanently changed by his experience and captivated by a Bayaka culture, In Song from the Forest Sarno has chronicled his attempt to protect the fragile existence of the Pygmies in an increasingly destructive world. Once, when his son, Samedi, became seriously ill and Sarno feared for his life, he held his son in his arms through a frightful night and made him a promise: “If you get through this, one day I’ll show you the world I come from.” Now the time has come to fulfill his promise. In a new major documentary film, Sarno tells the story of the Bayaka as he travels with Samedi from the African rain forest to another jungle, one of concrete, glass, and asphalt: New York City. Together, they meet Louis’ family and old friends, including his closest friend from college, Jim Jarmusch. Carried by the contrasts between rainforest and urban America, and a fascinating soundtrack, Louis‘ and Samedi‘s stories are interwoven to form a touching portrait of an extraordinary man and his son. SONG FROM THE FOREST is a modern epic film set between rainforest and skyscrapers.

Among the Forest People

Author: Clara Dillingham Pierson
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781625589347
Release Date: 2013-04-12
Genre: Juvenile Fiction

Among the Forest People includes nineteen charming tales about the everyday life of the forest creatures. The tales are told in such a manner that they seem realistic, and are not only entertaining, but educational.

Hierarchy in the Forest

Author: Christopher BOEHM
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674028449
Release Date: 2009-06-30
Genre: Science

Are humans by nature hierarchical or egalitarian? Hierarchy in the Forest addresses this question by examining the evolutionary origins of social and political behavior. Christopher Boehm, an anthropologist whose fieldwork has focused on the political arrangements of human and nonhuman primate groups, postulates that egalitarianism is in effect a hierarchy in which the weak combine forces to dominate the strong. The political flexibility of our species is formidable: we can be quite egalitarian, we can be quite despotic. Hierarchy in the Forest traces the roots of these contradictory traits in chimpanzee, bonobo, gorilla, and early human societies. Boehm looks at the loose group structures of hunter-gatherers, then at tribal segmentation, and finally at present-day governments to see how these conflicting tendencies are reflected. Hierarchy in the Forest claims new territory for biological anthropology and evolutionary biology by extending the domain of these sciences into a crucial aspect of human political and social behavior. This book will be a key document in the study of the evolutionary basis of genuine altruism. Table of Contents: The Question of Egalitarian Society Hierarchy and Equality Putting Down Aggressors Equality and Its Causes A Wider View of Egalitarianism The Hominoid Political Spectrum Ancestral Politics The Evolution of Egalitarian Society Paleolithic Politics and Natural Selection Ambivalence and Compromise in Human Nature References Index Reviews of this book: This well-written book, geared toward an audience with background in the behavioral and evolutionary sciences but accessible to a broad readership, raises two general questions: 'What is an egalitarian society?' and 'How have these societies evolved?'...[Christopher Boehm] takes the reader on a journey from the Arctic to the Americas, from Australia to Africa, in search of hunter-gatherer and tribal societies that emanate the egalitarian ethos--one that promotes generosity, altruism and sharing but forbids upstartism, aggression and egoism. Throughout this journey, Boehm tantalizes the reader with vivid anthropological accounts of ridicule, criticism, ostracism and even execution--prevalent tactics used by subordinates in egalitarian societies to level the social playing field...Hierarchy in the Forest is an interesting and thought-provoking book that is surely an important contribution to perspectives on human sociality and politics. --Ryan Earley, American Scientist Reviews of this book: Combing an exhaustive ethnographic survey of human societies from groups of hunter-gatherers to contemporary residents of the Balkans with a detailed analysis of the behavioral attributes of non-human primates (chimpanzees, gorillas, bonobos), Boehm focuses on whether humans are hierarchical or egalitarian by nature...[Boehm's hypotheses] are invariably intriguing and well documented...He raises topics of wide interest and his book should get attention. --Publishers Weekly Boehm has been the first to look at egalitarianism with a cold, unromantic eye. He sees it as a victory over hierarchical tendencies, which are equally marked in our species. I would predict that his insightful examination will reverberate within anthropology and the social sciences as well as among biologists interested in the evolution of social systems. --Frans de Waal, Emory University Hierarchy in the Forest is an original and stimulating contribution to thinking about the origins of egalitarianism. I personally find Boehm's ideas convincing, but whether one agrees with him or not, he has formulated his hypotheses in such a way that this book is likely to set the terms of the discussion for the forseeable future. --Barbara Smuts, University of Michigan The most unique and interesting feature of this clear, well written book is the way Boehm links the study of nonhuman primates (particularly chimpanzees) to traditional concepts of political anthropology. As a political scientist, I was intrigued by Boehm's suggestion that democracy, both ancient and modern, could be understood as the expression of the same natural dispositions that support the egalitarianism of nomadic bands and sedentary tribes. I expect that many scholars in biology, anthropology, and the social sciences would learn from this stimulating book. Even those who disagree with Boehm's arguments are likely to be provoked in instructive ways. --Larry Arnhart, Northern Illinois University Chris Boehm boldly and cogently attacks a whole orthodoxy in anthropology which sees hunter-gatherer 'egalitarianism' as somehow the basic form of human society. No praise can be too high for Boehm's brilliant and courageous book. --Robin Fox, Rutgers University

In the Arms of Africa

Author: Roy Richard Grinker
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226309045
Release Date: 2001-11-01
Genre: Social Science

Colin Turnbull made a name for himself with The Forest People, his acclaimed study of African Pygmies. His second book, however, The Mountain People, ignited a swirl of controversy within anthropology and tainted Turnbull's reputation as a respected anthropologist. In this scrupulously researched biography, Roy Richard Grinker charts the rise and fall of this colorful and controversial man—from his Scottish family and British education to travels in Africa and his great love affair with Joe Towles. Grinker, noted for his own work on the Pygmies, herein gives readers a fascinating account of Turnbull's life and work. Originally published by St. Martin's Press

Fugitives of the Forest

Author: Allan Levine
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9781461750055
Release Date: 2010-07-13
Genre: History

The heroic story of Jewish resistance and survival during the Second World War.