The Great Clod

Author: Gary Snyder
Publisher: Catapult
ISBN: 9781619026636
Release Date: 2016-05-01
Genre: Travel

For the full course of his remarkable career, Gary Snyder has continued his study of Eastern culture and philosophies. From the Ainu to the Mongols, from Hokkaido to Kyoto, from the landscapes of China to the backcountry of contemporary Japan, from the temples of Daitokoji to the Yellow River Valley, it is now clear how this work has influenced his poetry, his stance as an environmental and political activist, and his long practice of Zen. Growing up in the Pacific Northwest, Asia became a vocation for Snyder. While most American writers looked to the capitals of Europe for their inspiration, Sndyer looked East. American letters is profoundly indebted to this geographical choice. Long rumored to exist, The Great Clod collects more than a dozen chapters, several published in The Coevolution Quarterly almost forty years ago when Snyder briefly described this work as “The China Book, and several others, the majority, never before published in any form. “Summer in Hokkaido, “Wild in China, “Ink and Charcoal, “Stories to Save the World, “Walking the Great Ridge, these essays turn from being memoirs of travel to prolonged considerations of art, culture, natural history and religion. Filled with Snyders remarkable insights and briskly beautiful descriptions, this collection adds enormously to the major corpus of his work, certain to delight and instruct his readers now and forever.

Teaching the Daode Jing

Author: Gary Delaney DeAngelis
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780190450304
Release Date: 2008-04-10
Genre: Religion

The Daode Jing, a highly enigmatic work rooted in ancient Chinese cosmology, ontology, metaphysics, and moral thinking, is regularly offered to college and high-school students in religion, philosophy, history, literature, Asian studies, and humanities courses. As a result, an ever-expanding group of faculty with very different backgrounds and training routinely confront the question: "How should I teach the Daode Jing?" Written for non-specialists who may not have a background in ancient Chinese culture, the essays collected in this volume provide up-to-date information on contemporary scholarship and classroom strategies that have been successful in a variety of teaching environments. A classic text like the Daode Jing generates debate among scholars and teachers who ask questions like: Should we capitalize on popular interest in the Daode Jing in our classrooms? Which of the many translations and scholarly approaches ought we to use? Is it appropriate to think of the Daode Jing as a religious text at all? These and other controversies are addressed in this volume. Contributors are well-known scholars of Daoism, including Livia Kohn, Norman Girardot, Robert Henricks, Russell Kirkland, Hans-Georg Moeller, Hall Roth, and Michael LaFargue. In addition, there are essays by Eva Wong (Daoist practitioner), David Hall (philosophy), Gary DeAngelis (mysticism), and a jointly written essay on pedagogical strategies by Judith Berling, Geoffrey Foy, and John Thompson (Chinese religion).

What Is Taoism

Author: Herrlee Glessner Creel
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226120473
Release Date: 1982-09-15
Genre: Philosophy

What Is Taoism? traces, in nontechnical language, the history of the development of this often baffling doctrine. Creel shows that there has not been one "Taoism," but at least three, in some respects incompatible and often antagonistic. In eight closely related papers, Creel explicates the widely used concepts he originally introduced of "contemplative Taoism," "purposive Taoism," and "Hsien Taoism." He also discusses Shen Pu-hai, a political philosopher of the fourth century B.C.; the curious interplay between Confucianism, Taoism, and "Legalism" in the second century B.C.; and the role of the horse in Chinese history.

Matsuo Bash s Poetic Spaces

Author: E. Kerkham
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9780230601871
Release Date: 2006-12-11
Genre: Literary Criticism

Haikai is an art that parodies and often subverts its linguistic, generic, and personal predecessors, and its intersections include imaginative links to the rest of Japanese literature and culture. This collection of essays explores certain neglected aspects of this haikaimaster's literary and philosophical contributions.

The Complete Works of Zhuangzi

Author:
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231536509
Release Date: 2013-12-03
Genre: Religion

Only by inhabiting Dao (the Way of Nature) and dwelling in its unity can humankind achieve true happiness and freedom, in both life and death. This is Daoist philosophy's central tenet, espoused by the person—or group of people—known as Zhuangzi (369?-286? B.C.E.) in a text by the same name. To be free, individuals must discard rigid distinctions between good and bad, right and wrong, and follow a course of action not motivated by gain or striving. When one ceases to judge events as good or bad, man-made suffering disappears and natural suffering is embraced as part of life. Zhuangzi elucidates this mystical philosophy through humor, parable, and anecdote, deploying non sequitur and even nonsense to illuminate a truth beyond the boundaries of ordinary logic. Boldly imaginative and inventively worded, the Zhuangzi floats free of its historical period and society, addressing the spiritual nourishment of all people across time. One of the most justly celebrated texts of the Chinese tradition, the Zhuangzi is read by thousands of English-language scholars each year, yet only in the Wade-Giles romanization. Burton Watson's pinyin romanization brings the text in line with how Chinese scholars, and an increasing number of other scholars, read it.

Religions east and west

Author: Ward J. Fellows
Publisher: Harcourt School
ISBN: UVA:X000016153
Release Date: 1979-03-01
Genre: Religion

Describes and compares the seven major religions of the world with the desire to demonstrate the fundamental similarity of religious belief and to improve human understanding

The New Directions Anthology of Classical Chinese Poetry

Author: Eliot Weinberger
Publisher: New Directions Publishing
ISBN: 0811216055
Release Date: 2004
Genre: Poetry

A groundbreaking anthology of classical Chinese translations by giants of Modern American poetry. A rich compendium of translations, The New Directions Anthology of Classical Chinese Poetry is the first collection to look at Chinese poetry through its enormous influence on American poetry. Weinberger begins with Ezra Pound's Cathay (1915), and includes translations by three other major U.S. poetsWilliam Carlos Williams, Kenneth Rexroth, Gary Snyderand an important poet-translator-scholar, David Hinton, all of whom have long been associated with New Directions. Moreover, it is the first general anthology ever to consider the process of translation by presenting different versions of the same poem by various translators, as well as examples of the translators rewriting themselves. The collection, at once playful and instructive, serves as an excellent introduction to the art and tradition of Chinese poetry, gathering some 250 poems by nearly 40 poets. The anthology also includes previously uncollected translations by Pound; a selection of essays on Chinese poetry by all five translators, some never published before in book form; Lu Chi's famous "Rhymeprose on Literature" translated by Achilles Fang; biographical notes that are a collage of poems and comments by both the American translators and the Chinese poets themselves; and also Weinberger's excellent introduction that historically contextualizes the influence Chinese poetry has had on the work of American poets.

Animals and World Religions

Author: Lisa Kemmerer
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199912551
Release Date: 2011-12-09
Genre: Religion

Despite increasing public attention to animal suffering, little seems to have changed: Human beings continue to exploit billions of animals in factory farms, medical laboratories, and elsewhere. In this wide-ranging and perceptive study, Lisa Kemmerer shows how spiritual writings and teachings in seven major religious traditions can help people to consider their ethical obligations toward other creatures. Dr. Kemmerer examines the role of nonhuman animals in scripture and myth, in the lives of religious exemplars, and by drawing on foundational philosophical and moral teachings. She begins with a study of indigenous traditions around the world, then focuses on the religions of India (Hindu, Buddhist, and Jain) and China (Daoism and Confucianism), and finally, religions of the Middle East (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam). At the end of each chapter, Kemmerer explores the inspiring lives and work of contemporary animal advocates who are motivated by a personal religious commitment. Animals and World Religions demonstrates that rethinking how we treat nonhuman animals is essential for anyone claiming one of the world's great religions.

Lady Churchill s Rosebud Wristlet No 28

Author: Kelly Link
Publisher: Small Beer Press
ISBN: 9781618730671
Release Date: 2013-10-18
Genre: Fiction

Lady Churchill's Rosebud Wristlet (a self-titled Occasional Outburst) returns either incredibly late for 2012 or incredibly early for 2014.

Sylva Sylvarum Or A Natural History in Ten Centuries

Author: Francis Bacon
Publisher:
ISBN: UCSF:31378008334495
Release Date: 1670
Genre: Death

"The natural histories in this book are full of descriptions and pictures. Their purpose if to build a true philosophy for the illumination of the understanding; the extracting of axioms, and the producing of many noble works and effects. It is hoped that this will be an advancement of learning and sciences." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

Zhuangzi Basic Writings

Author: Zhuangzi
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231521338
Release Date: 2003-04-16
Genre: Philosophy

Only by inhabiting Dao (the Way of Nature) and dwelling in its unity can humankind achieve true happiness and freedom, in both life and death. This is Daoist philosophy's central tenet, espoused by the person—or group of people—known as Zhuangzi (369?–286? BCE) in a text by the same name. To be free, individuals must discard rigid distinctions between right and wrong, and follow a course of action not motivated by gain or striving. When one ceases to judge events as good or bad, man-made suffering disappears, and natural suffering is embraced as part of life. Zhuangzi elucidates this mystical philosophy through humor, parable, and anecdote, using non sequitur and even nonsense to illuminate truths beyond the boundaries of ordinary logic. Boldly imaginative and inventively written, the Zhuangzi floats free of its historical period and society, addressing the spiritual nourishment of all people across time. One of the most justly celebrated texts of the Chinese tradition, the Zhuangzi is read by thousands of English-language scholars each year, yet, until now, only in the Wade-Giles romanization. Burton Watson's conversion to pinyin in this book brings the text in line with how Chinese scholars, and an increasing number of other scholars, read it.