The Imitation of Gestures

Author: Jean Bergès
Publisher: Elsevier
ISBN: 9781483221526
Release Date: 2016-08-10
Genre: Science

The Imitation of Gestures describes the sets of tests of the imitation of gestures in children performed by the examiner. These tests provide valuable information about the development of motor skills, particularly the right-left orientation in children from 4 to 8 years of age. This book is composed of two main sections encompassing 9 chapters. Part I presents the methods for studying the imitation of simple and complex gestures of the hands and arms. This part also covers the application of these methods to children who would be likely to have disturbances in motor and verbal development. The second part describes the supplementary tests to the Imitation of gestures test used for the study of body image. This part also deals with the intercorrelations between the results obtained on the different tests, namely, the Imitation of gestures, Drawn-a-man test, Grace Arthur mannequin puzzle, and the verbal test of naming and pointing to the body parts. Pediatricians, neurologists, and clinical psychologists will find this book rewarding.

The Imitative Mind

Author: Andrew N. Meltzoff
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139439766
Release Date: 2002-04-18
Genre: Psychology

Imitation guides the behaviour of a range of species. Scientific advances in the study of imitation at multiple levels from neurons to behaviour have far-reaching implications for cognitive science, neuroscience, and evolutionary and developmental psychology. This volume, first published in 2002, provides a summary of the research on imitation in both Europe and America, including work on infants, adults, and nonhuman primates, with speculations about robotics. A special feature of the book is that it provides a concrete instance of the links between developmental psychology, neuroscience, and cognitive science. It showcases how an interdisciplinary approach to imitation can illuminate long-standing problems in the brain sciences, including consciousness, self, perception-action coding, theory of mind, and intersubjectivity. The book addresses what it means to be human and how we get that way.

The Child with Spina Bifida

Author: Elizabeth M. Anderson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781317326328
Release Date: 2016-02-26
Genre: Social Science

First published in 1977, this book focuses on the disability of spina bifida in children. Children with the condition frequently suffer with severe physical handicaps such as lower limb paralysis and incontinence, as well as intellectual impairment. It can be difficult for the families of these multiply handicapped children and they often require the help of professionals from many disciplines. In this book, the authors focus on practical suggestions for alleviating many of the problems brought about by the condition. Their suggestions are designed to help parents, as well as professionals.

Virality

Author: Tony D. Sampson
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 9780816670055
Release Date: 2012
Genre: Philosophy

In this thought-provoking work, Tony D. Sampson presents a contagion theory fit for the age of networks. Unlike memes and microbial contagions,Virality does not restrict itself to biological analogies and medical metaphors. It instead points toward a theory of contagious assemblages, events, and affects. For Sampson, contagion is not necessarily a positive or negative force of encounter; it is how society comes together and relates. Sampson argues that a biological knowledge of contagion has been universally distributed by way of the rhetoric of fear used in the antivirus industry and other popular discourses surrounding network culture. This awareness is also detectable in concerns over too much connectivity, such as problems of global financial crisis and terrorism. Sampson's “virality” is as established as that of the biological meme and microbe but is not understood through representational thinking expressed in metaphors and analogies. Rather, Sampson interprets contagion theory through the social relationalities first established in Gabriel Tarde's microsociology and subsequently recognized in Gilles Deleuze's ontological worldview. According to Sampson, the reliance on representational thinking to explain the social behavior of networking—including that engaged in by nonhumans such as computers—allows language to overcategorize and limit analysis by imposing identities, oppositions, and resemblances on contagious phenomena. It is the power of these categories that impinges on social and cultural domains. Assemblage theory, on the other hand, is all about relationality and encounter, helping us to understand the viral as a positively sociological event, building from the molecular outward, long before it becomes biological.