The Journey of Man

Author: Spencer Wells
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9780691176017
Release Date: 2017-03-28
Genre: Reference

Around 200,000 years ago, a man--identical to us in all important respects--lived in Africa. Every person alive today is descended from him. How did this real-life Adam wind up father of us all? What happened to the descendants of other men who lived at the same time? And why, if modern humans share a single prehistoric ancestor, do we come in so many sizes, shapes, and races? Showing how the secrets about our ancestors are hidden in our genetic code, Spencer Wells reveals how developments in the cutting-edge science of population genetics have made it possible to create a family tree for the whole of humanity. We now know not only where our ancestors lived but who they fought, loved, and influenced. Informed by this new science, The Journey of Man is replete with astonishing information. Wells tells us that we can trace our origins back to a single Adam and Eve, but that Eve came first by some 80,000 years. We hear how the male Y-chromosome has been used to trace the spread of humanity from Africa into Eurasia, why differing racial types emerged when mountain ranges split population groups, and that the San Bushmen of the Kalahari have some of the oldest genetic markers in the world. We learn, finally with absolute certainty, that Neanderthals are not our ancestors and that the entire genetic diversity of Native Americans can be accounted for by just ten individuals. It is an enthralling, epic tour through the history and development of early humankind--as well as an accessible look at the analysis of human genetics that is giving us definitive answers to questions we have asked for centuries, questions now more compelling than ever.

History Dances

Author: Ofosuwa M. Abiola
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9780429767845
Release Date: 2018-11-16
Genre: History

The field of history is founded on the interrogation of written documents from the past. However, culture is the center of life in Africa. As a result, in the past – and to a degree in the present – the process for documenting events in Africa was not written, it was performed. History Dances: Chronicling the History of Traditional Mandinka Dance argues that a wealth of information is housed within traditional Mandinka dance and, consequently, the dances can be used as an African-derived primary source for writing African history. Ofosuwa M. Abiola highlights the overall value of studying Mandinka dance history specifically, and African dance history generally, as well as addressing the issue of scarcity with regard to primary sources for writing African history. History Dances proves to be a vital read for both undergraduate students and scholars in the fields of dance history, African history, performance studies, and cultural anthropology.

Human Origins

Author: Rob DeSalle
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 1585445673
Release Date: 2008
Genre: Fossil hominids

Ever since the recognition of the Neanderthals as an archaic human in the mid-nineteenth century, the fossilized bones of extinct humans have been used by paleoanthropologists to explore human origins. These bones told the story of how the earliest humans—bipedal apes, actually—first emerged in Africa some 6 to 7 million years ago. Starting about 2 million years ago, the bones revealed, as humans became anatomically and behaviorally more modern, they swept out of Africa in waves into Asia, Europe and finally the New World. Even as paleoanthropologists continued to make important discoveries—Mary Leakey’s Nutcracker Man in 1959, Don Johanson’s Lucy in 1974, and most recently Martin Pickford’s Millennium Man, to name just a few—experts in genetics were looking at the human species from a very different angle. In 1953 James Watson and Francis Crick first saw the double helix structure of DNA, the basic building block of all life. In the 1970s it was shown that humans share 98.7% of their genes with the great apes—that in fact genetically we are more closely related to chimpanzees than chimpanzees are to gorillas. And most recently the entire human genome has been mapped—we now know where each of the genes on the chromosomes that make up DNA is located on the double helix. In Human Origins: What Bones and Genomes Tell Us about Ourselves, two of the world’s foremost scientists, geneticist Rob DeSalle and paleoanthropologist Ian Tattersall, show how research into the human genome confirms what fossil bones have told us about human origins. This unprecedented integration of the fossil and genomic records provides the most complete understanding possible of humanity’s place in nature, its emergence from the rest of the living world, and the evolutionary processes that have molded human populations to be what they are today. Human Origins serves as a companion volume to the American Museum of Natural History’s new permanent exhibit, as well as standing alone as an accessible overview of recent insights into what it means to be human.

The Postgenomic Condition

Author: Jenny Reardon
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226510453
Release Date: 2017-12-29
Genre: Philosophy

The postgenomic condition: an introduction -- The information of life or the life of information? -- Inclusion: can genomics be antiracist? -- Who represents the human genome? What is the human genome? -- Genomics for the people or the rise of the machines? -- Genomics for the 98 percent? -- The genomic open 2.0: the public v. the public -- Life on Third: knowledge and justice after the genome -- Epilogue

Ancestors and Relatives

Author: Eviatar Zerubavel
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199912315
Release Date: 2011-11-04
Genre: Social Science

Genealogy has long been one of humanity's greatest obsessions. But with the rise of genetics, and increasing media attention to it through programs like Who Do You Think You Are? and Faces of America, we are now told that genetic markers can definitively tell us who we are and where we came from. The problem, writes Eviatar Zerubavel, is that biology does not provide us with the full picture. After all, he asks, why do we consider Barack Obama black even though his mother was white? Why did the Nazis believe that unions of Germans and Jews would produce Jews rather than Germans? In this provocative book, he offers a fresh understanding of relatedness, showing that its social logic sometimes overrides the biological reality it supposedly reflects. In fact, rather than just biological facts, social traditions of remembering and classifying shape the way we trace our ancestors, identify our relatives, and delineate families, ethnic groups, nations, and species. Furthermore, genealogies are more than mere records of history. Drawing on a wide range of evidence, Zerubavel introduces such concepts as braiding, clipping, pasting, lumping, splitting, stretching, and pruning to shed light on how we manipulate genealogies to accommodate personal and collective agendas of inclusion and exclusion. Rather than simply find out who our ancestors were and identify our relatives, we actually construct the genealogical narratives that make them our ancestors and relatives. An eye-opening re-examination of our very notion of relatedness, Ancestors and Relatives offers a new way of understanding family, ethnicity, nationhood, race, and humanity.

Human origins

Author: Rob DeSalle
Publisher: TAMU Press
ISBN: UOM:39015077649856
Release Date: 2008
Genre: Medical

Ever since the recognition of the Neanderthals as an archaic form of human in the mid-nineteenth century, the fossilized bones of extinct humans have been used by paleoanthropologists to explore human origins. These bones tell the story of how the earliest humans first emerged in Africa some 6 to 7 million years ago. The bones also reveal that as humans became anatomically and behaviorally more modern, they swept out of Africa in waves into Asia, Europe, and finally into the New World. Even as paleoanthropologists continued to make important discoveries, experts in genetics were looking at the human species from a very different angle. In 1953 James Watson and Francis Crick first envisioned the double helix structure of DNA, the basic building block of all life. In the 1970s it was shown that humans share 98.7 percent of their genes with the great apes--that in fact genetically we are more closely related to chimpanzees than chimpanzees are to gorillas. And most recently the entire human genome has been mapped--we now know where each of the genes are located on the DNA strands that make up our chromosomes. In Human Origins: What Bones and Genomes Tell Us about Ourselves, two of the worlds foremost scientists, geneticist Rob DeSalle and paleoanthropologist Ian Tattersall, show how research into the human genome confirms what fossil bones have told us about human origins. This unprecedented integration of the fossil and genomic records provides the most complete understanding possible of humanity's place in nature, its emergence from the rest of the living world, and the evolutionary processes that have molded human populations to be what they are today.

Race and Science

Author: Paul Lawrence Farber
Publisher:
ISBN: PSU:000067068005
Release Date: 2009
Genre: Science

During the course of American history, scientific theories have been used to legitimate racial ideas that in turn have been important in creating and interpreting the law. Race and Science collects essays from leading voices in law, history, history of science, botany, and the social sciences, resulting in a rich and comprehensive multidisciplinary exploration of the roots of and the scientific challenges to racial essentialism. The notion that someone's racial identity and characteristics define everything of importance about them has become deeply embedded in American culture, society, and science. These essays illuminate the roots of this belief and present case studies that explore how and why natural and social scientists have challenged these racist views. Race and Science will be of interest to historians, social scientists, educators, and scientists, and others interested in racism as a phenomenon in American culture.

Library Journal

Author:
Publisher:
ISBN: UOM:39015082964944
Release Date: 2003
Genre: Libraries

Includes, beginning Sept. 15, 1954 (and on the 15th of each month, Sept.-May) a special section: School library journal, ISSN 0000-0035, (called Junior libraries, 1954-May 1961). Also issued separately.

Choice

Author:
Publisher:
ISBN: UOM:39015079402452
Release Date: 2003
Genre: Academic libraries


Pur tattva

Author:
Publisher:
ISBN: UCLA:L0099691149
Release Date: 2006
Genre: Archaeology


Heart of dryness

Author: James G. Workman
Publisher: Walker & Company
ISBN: STANFORD:36105124114823
Release Date: 2009-08-04
Genre: Nature

A chronicle of how the Kalahari Bushmen's history was intertwined with that of the drought in Africa includes coverage of their widely publicized battle with the Botswana government and offers a cautionary lesson about water issues facing the twenty-first century.

Senior High Core Collection

Author: Raymond W. Barber
Publisher: Hw Wilson Co
ISBN: 0824210867
Release Date: 2007-10-31
Genre: Best books

- More than 6,500 books in the initial clothbound volume, plus more than 2,400 new titles in four annual supplements. - New coverage of biographies, art, sports, Islam and the Middle East, and cultural diversity. - Special focus on graphic novels, primary source materials, nonbook materials, and periodicals. - Analytic entries for items in collections and anthologies.

The Worldwide History of Dress

Author: Patricia Rieff Anawalt
Publisher: Thames Hudson
ISBN: UOM:39015074298012
Release Date: 2007
Genre: Design

Chronicles every notable geographical region, historical period, and style of dress and accessories, featuring more than one thousand illustrations of museum-quality artifacts, historical paintings, woodblock prints, and other artworks.