The Little School

Author: Alicia Partnoy
Publisher: Cleis Press
ISBN: 9781573440295
Release Date: 1998-09-03
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

With poetry and insight, the author recalls her life in a concentration camp as one of Argentina's 30,000 "disappeared"

The Little School

Author: Alicia Partnoy
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781573444880
Release Date: 1998-09-01
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

One of Argentina's 30,000 "disappeared," Alicia Partnoy was abducted from her home by secret police and taken to a concentration camp where she was tortured, and where most of the other prisoners were killed. Her writings were smuggled out of prison and published anonymously in human rights journals. The Little School is Alicia Partnoy's memoir of her disappearance and imprisonment in Argentina in the 1970s. Told in a series of tales that resound in memory like parables, The Little School is proof of the resilience of the human spirit and the healing powers of art. This second edition features a revised introduction by the author and a preface by Julia Alvarez.

The Little School

Author: Alicia Partnoy
Publisher:
ISBN: 1573440299
Release Date: 1998
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

Told in a series of tales that resound in memory like parables, Alicia Partnoy's memoir of disappearance in Argentina is proof of the resilience of the human spirit and the healing powers of art.

Postmemories of Terror

Author: S. Kaiser
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9781403980229
Release Date: 2005-12-10
Genre: Social Science

Postmemories of Terror focuses on how young Argentineans remember the traumatic events of the military dictatorship (1976-83). This fascinating work is based on oral histories with sixty-three young people who were too young to be directly victimized or politically active during this period. All were born during or after the terror and possessed an entirely mediated knowledge of it. Susana Kaiser explores how the post-dictatorship generation was reconstructing this past from three main sources: inter-generational dialogue, education and the communication media. These conversations discuss selected and recurrent themes like societal fears and silences, remembering and forgetting, historical explanations and accountability. Together they contribute to our understanding of how communities deal with the legacy of terror.

Human Rights in Latin America

Author: Sonia Cardenas
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 9780812201543
Release Date: 2012-06-29
Genre: Political Science

For the last half century, Latin America has been plagued by civil wars, dictatorships, torture, legacies of colonialism and racism, and other evils. The region has also experienced dramatic—if uneven—human rights improvements. The accounts of how Latin America's people have dealt with the persistent threats to their fundamental rights offer lessons for people around the world. Human Rights in Latin America: A Politics of Terror and Hope is the first textbook to provide a comprehensive introduction to the human rights issues facing an area that constitutes more than half of the Western Hemisphere. Leading human rights researcher and educator Sonia Cardenas brings together regional examples of both terror and hope, emphasizing the dualities inherent in human rights struggles. Organized by three pivotal topics—human rights violations, reform, and accountability—this book offers an authoritative synthesis of research on human rights on the continent. From historical accounts of abuse to successful transnational campaigns and legal battles, Human Rights in Latin America explores the tensions underlying a vast range of human rights initiatives. In addition to surveying the roles of the United States, relatives of the disappeared, and truth commissions, Cardenas covers newer ground in addressing the colonial and ideological underpinnings of human rights abuses, emerging campaigns for disability and sexuality rights, and regional dynamics relating to the International Criminal Court. Engagingly written and fully illustrated, Human Rights in Latin America creates an important niche among human rights and Latin American textbooks. Ample supplementary resources—including discussion questions, interdisciplinary reading lists, filmographies, online resources, internship opportunities, and instructor assignments—make this an especially valuable text for use in human rights courses.

The Underdogs

Author: Mariano Azuela
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781101637739
Release Date: 2013-09-03
Genre: Fiction

Hailed as the greatest novel of the Mexican Revolution, The Underdogs recounts the story of an illiterate but charismatic Indian peasant farmer’s part in the rebellion against Porfirio Díaz, and his subsequent loss of belief in the cause when the revolutionary alliance becomes factionalized. Azuela’s masterpiece is a timeless, authentic portrayal of peasant life, revolutionary zeal, and political disillusionment.

Women and Politics in Latin America

Author: Nikki Craske
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9780745666082
Release Date: 2013-07-08
Genre: Political Science

This book provides a comprehensive view of women's political participation in Latin America. Focusing on the latter half of the twentieth century, it examines five different arenas of action and debate: political institutions, workplaces, social movements, revolutions and feminisms.

La escuelita

Author: Alicia Partnoy
Publisher:
ISBN: 9871019319
Release Date: 2006
Genre: Disappeared persons


I Rigoberta Menchu

Author: Rigoberta Menchu
Publisher: Verso Books
ISBN: 9781844674718
Release Date: 2010-01-12
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

Now a global bestseller, the remarkable life of Rigoberta Menchú, a Guatemalan peasant woman, reflects on the experiences common to many Indian communities in Latin America. Menchú suffered gross injustice and hardship in her early life: her brother, father and mother were murdered by the Guatemalan military. She learned Spanish and turned to catechistic work as an expression of political revolt as well as religious commitment. Menchú vividly conveys the traditional beliefs of her community and her personal response to feminist and socialist ideas. Above all, these pages are illuminated by the enduring courage and passionate sense of justice of an extraordinary woman.

A Disappearance in Damascus

Author: Deborah Campbell
Publisher: Picador
ISBN: 9781250147899
Release Date: 2017-09-05
Genre: History

Winner of the Hilary Weston Writers’ Trust Prize for Nonfiction Winner of the Freedom to Read Award Winner of the Hubert Evans Prize In the midst of an unfolding international crisis, renowned journalist Deborah Campbell finds herself swept up in the mysterious disappearance of Ahlam, her guide and friend. Campbell’s frank, personal account of a journey through fear and the triumph of friendship and courage is as riveting as it is illuminating. The story begins in 2007, when Deborah Campbell travels undercover to Damascus to report on the exodus of Iraqis into Syria, following the overthrow of Saddam Hussein. There she meets and hires Ahlam, a refugee working as a “fixer”—providing Western media with trustworthy information and contacts to help get the news out. Ahlam has fled her home in Iraq after being kidnapped while running a humanitarian center. She supports her husband and two children while working to set up a makeshift school for displaced girls. Strong and charismatic, she has become an unofficial leader of the refugee community. Campbell is inspired by Ahlam’s determination to create something good amid so much suffering, and the two women become close friends. But one morning, Ahlam is seized from her home in front of Campbell’s eyes. Haunted by the prospect that their work together has led to her friend’s arrest, Campbell spends the months that follow desperately trying to find Ahlam—all the while fearing she could be next. The compelling story of two women caught up in the shadowy politics behind today’s most searing conflict, A Disappearance in Damascus reminds us of the courage of those who risk their lives to bring us the world’s news.

Faces of Latin America

Author: Duncan Green
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9781583673249
Release Date: 2012-11-01
Genre: History

Faces of Latin America has sold more than 50,000 copies since it first appeared in 1991, and is widely considered to be the best available introduction in English to the economies, politics, demography, social structures, environment and cultures of Latin America. Duncan Green and Sue Branford take the reader beyond the conventional media’s fixation on the drug trade, corrupt politicians and military leaders, death squads, and guerrilla movements to celebrate the vibrant history and culture of Latin America’s people. Faces of Latin America examines some of the key forces—from conquest and the growth of the commodity trade, military rule, land distribution, industrialization, and migration to civil wars and revolutions, the debt crisis, neoliberalism, and NAFTA—shaping the region’s political and social history. Green also analyzes the response to these transformations—the rise of freedom fighters and populists, guerrilla wars and grassroots social movements, union organizing and trade movements, liberation theology, and the women’s movement, sustainable development and the fight for the rainforest, popular culture and the mass media—providing a fascinating and unparalleled portrait of the continent. This new edition is thoroughly updated and covers recent developments in Latin America such as the growing costs of export agriculture, the rise of Brazilian manufacturing, connections between the war on drugs and the war on terror, the social costs of neoliberalism, the Argentinian default, the search for new economic models in Venezuela and elsewhere, the decline in direct U.S. military intervention in the region, growing urbanization, urban poverty and casual employment, outmigration and the importance of family remittances from abroad, rampant environmental destruction, the struggles of indigenous movements, and more.

Imagining Argentina

Author: Lawrence Thornton
Publisher: Bantam
ISBN: 9780553345797
Release Date: 1988
Genre: Fiction

When his wife suddenly vanishes, Carlos Rueda, director of the Children's Theatre in Buenos Aires, discovers that his magical visions of the fate of the innocent people disappearing in Argentina are true, in an award-winning novel set against the turbulent backdrop of 1970s Argentina. Reissue. (A Universal Pictures & Arenas Entertainment film, directed by Christopher Hampton, starring Antonio Banderas, Emma Thompson, Ruben Blades, & Claire Bloom) (General Fiction)

Baby You are My Religion

Author: Marie Cartier
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781317544715
Release Date: 2014-09-11
Genre: Religion

Baby, You Are My Religion argues that American butch-femme bar culture of the mid-20th Century should be interpreted as a sacred space for its community. Before Stonewall—when homosexuals were still deemed mentally ill—these bars were the only place where many could have any community at all. Baby, You are My Religion explores this community as a site of a lived corporeal theology and political space. It reveals that religious institutions such as the Metropolitan Community Church were founded in such bars, that traditional and non-traditional religious activities took place there, and that religious ceremonies such as marriage were often conducted within the bars by staff. Baby, You are My Religion examines how these bars became not only ecclesiastical sites but also provided the fertile ground for the birth of the struggle for gay and lesbian civil rights before Stonewall.

Argentina s Missing Bones

Author: James P. Brennan
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520970076
Release Date: 2018-03-30
Genre: History

Argentina’s Missing Bones is the first comprehensive English-language work of historical scholarship on the 1976–83 military dictatorship and Argentina’s notorious experience with state terrorism during the so-called dirty war. It examines this history in a single but crucial place: Córdoba, Argentina’s second largest city. A site of thunderous working-class and student protest prior to the dictatorship, it later became a place where state terrorism was particularly cruel. Considering the legacy of this violent period, James P. Brennan examines the role of the state in constructing a public memory of the violence and in holding those responsible accountable through the most extensive trials for crimes against humanity to take place anywhere in Latin America.

The Pinochet Effect

Author: Naomi Roht-Arriaza
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812219740
Release Date: 2006
Genre: Law

What Pinochet's arrest has taught us about transnational justice and international jurisdiction.