The Louisiana Planter and Sugar Manufacturer

Author: Louisiana Sugar Planters' Association
Publisher: Sagwan Press
ISBN: 1376615215
Release Date: 2018-02-03
Genre: Business & Economics

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

From Tally Ho to Forest Home

Author: William D. Reeves
Publisher: AuthorHouse
ISBN: 9781467847360
Release Date: 2005-12-14
Genre: Fiction

This history of two plantations on the Mississippi River between New Orleans and Baton Rouge examines the people and places around the tiny town of Bayou Goula in Iberville Parish from 1699 to 2000. It describes the different governmental policies that shaped the land tenure of the region. In chapter 3 the book describes the Acadian settlement and how two free people of color purchased several farms and consolidated them into the Tally-Ho plantation. Later chapters described the John Hampden Randolphs and the John D. Murrells, both investors from Virginia. Chapter six describes the rise and fall of the community of Bayou Goula. Chapter seven describes the African-Americans along Bayou Goula. Some of the family relationships are identified. Links between workers in the twentieth century and workers in slavery appear. Chapter eight relies on memoirs of life at Tally-Ho and the community of Bayou Goula. It presents happy remembrances of things past. The chapter discusses education in the community, daily life, transportation, and relations between the families. Chapter nine describes the founding of the George M. Murrell Planting & Manufacturing Co., the major sugar grower and heir of the 19th century planters. Finally, the book discusses the 20th century successes and failures in the sugar business.

The House That Sugarcane Built

Author: Donna McGee Onebane
Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi
ISBN: 9781626741744
Release Date: 2014-07-17
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

The House That Sugarcane Built tells the saga of Jules M. Burguières Sr. and five generations of Louisianans who, after the Civil War, established a sugar empire that has survived into the present. When twenty-seven-year-old Parisian immigrant Eugène D. Burguières landed at the Port of New Orleans in 1831, one of the oldest Louisiana dynasties began. Seen through the lens of one family, this book traces the Burguières from seventeenth-century France, to nineteenth- century New Orleans and rural south Louisiana and into the twenty-first century. It is also a rich portrait of an American region that has retained its vibrant French culture. As the sweeping narrative of the clan unfolds, so does the story of their family-owned sugar business, the J. M. Burguières Company, as it plays a pivotal role in the expansion of the sugar industry in Louisiana, Florida, and Cuba. The French Burguières were visionaries who knew the value of land and its bountiful resources. The fertile soil along the bayous and wetlands of south Louisiana bestowed on them an abundance of sugarcane above its surface, and salt, oil, and gas beneath. Ever in pursuit of land, the Burguières expanded their holdings to include the vast swamps of the Florida Everglades; then, in 2004, they turned their sights to cattle ranches on the great frontier of west Texas. Finally, integral to the story are the complex dynamics and tensions inherent in this family-owned company, revealing both failures and victories in its history of more than 135 years. The J. M. Burguières Company’s survival has depended upon each generation safeguarding and nourishing a legacy for the next.

Black British Migrants in Cuba

Author: Jorge L. Giovannetti-Torres
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781108423465
Release Date: 2018-10-25
Genre: History

Provides a valuable transnational history of the African Diaspora through examination of British Afro-Caribbeans in Cuba.

Louisiana Biographical Dictionary

Author: Jan Onofrio
Publisher: Somerset Publishers, Inc.
ISBN: 9780403098170
Release Date: 1999-01-01
Genre: History

Louisiana Biographical Dictionary contains biographies on hundreds of persons from diverse vocations that were either born, achieved notoriety and/or died in the state of Louisiana. Prominent persons, in addition to the less eminent, that have played noteworthy roles are included in this resource. When people are recognized from your state or locale it brings a sense of pride to the residents of the entire state.

Cuban Studies 38

Author: Louis A. Perez, Jr.
Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Press
ISBN: 9780822971122
Release Date: 2008-01-27
Genre: History

Cuban Studies 38 examines topics that include: liberalism emanating from Havana in the early 1800s; Jose Martí's theory of psychocoloniality; the relationship between sugar planters, insurgents, and the Spanish military during the revolution; new aesthetics in Cuban cinema, the “recovery” of poet José Angel Buesa, and the meaning of Elián Gonzales in the context of life in Miami.

Educating the Sons of Sugar

Author: R. Eric Platt
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 9780817319663
Release Date: 2017-10-10
Genre: Education

A study of Louisiana French Creole sugar planters’ role in higher education and a detailed history of the only college ever constructed to serve the sugar elite. The education of individual planter classes—cotton, tobacco, sugar—is rarely treated in works of southern history. Of the existing literature, higher education is typically relegated to a footnote, providing only brief glimpses into a complex instructional regime responsive to wealthy planters. R. Eric Platt’s Educating the Sons of Sugar allows for a greater focus on the mindset of French Creole sugar planters and provides a comprehensive record and analysis of a private college supported by planter wealth. Jefferson College was founded in St. James Parish in 1831, surrounded by slave-holding plantations and their cash crop, sugar cane. Creole planters (regionally known as the “ancienne population”) designed the college to impart a “genteel” liberal arts education through instruction, architecture, and geographic location. Jefferson College played host to social class rivalries (Creole, Anglo-American, and French immigrant), mirrored the revival of Catholicism in a region typified by secular mores, was subject to the “Americanization” of south Louisiana higher education, and reflected the ancienne population’s decline as Louisiana’s ruling population. Resulting from loss of funds, the college closed in 1848. It opened and closed three more times under varying administrations (French immigrant, private sugar planter, and Catholic/Marist) before its final closure in 1927 due to educational competition, curricular intransigence, and the 1927 Mississippi River flood. In 1931, the campus was purchased by the Society of Jesus (Jesuits) and reopened as a silent religious retreat. It continues to function to this day as the Manresa House of Retreats. While in existence, Jefferson College was a social thermometer for the white French Creole sugar planter ethos that instilled the “sons of sugar” with a cultural heritage resonant of a region typified by the management of plantations, slavery, and the production of sugar.

Tropical Babylons

Author: Stuart B. Schwartz
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 9780807895627
Release Date: 2011-01-20
Genre: History

The idea that sugar, plantations, slavery, and capitalism were all present at the birth of the Atlantic world has long dominated scholarly thinking. In nine original essays by a multinational group of top scholars, Tropical Babylons re-evaluates this so-called "sugar revolution." The most comprehensive comparative study to date of early Atlantic sugar economies, this collection presents a revisionist examination of the origins of society and economy in the Atlantic world. Focusing on areas colonized by Spain and Portugal (before the emergence of the Caribbean sugar colonies of England, France, and Holland), these essays show that despite reliance on common knowledge and technology, there were considerable variations in the way sugar was produced. With studies of Iberia, Madeira and the Canary Islands, Hispaniola, Cuba, Brazil, and Barbados, this volume demonstrates the similarities and differences between the plantation colonies, questions the very idea of a sugar revolution, and shows how the specific conditions in each colony influenced the way sugar was produced and the impact of that crop on the formation of "tropical Babylons--multiracial societies of great oppression. Contributors: Alejandro de la Fuente, University of Pittsburgh Herbert Klein, Columbia University John J. McCusker, Trinity University Russell R. Menard, University of Minnesota William D. Phillips Jr., University of Minnesota Genaro Rodriguez Morel, Seville, Spain Stuart B. Schwartz, Yale University Eddy Stols, Leuven University, Belgium Alberto Vieira, Centro de Estudos Atlanticos, Madeira

Planter and Sugar Manufacturer

Author: Anonymous
Publisher: Palala Press
ISBN: 1354828100
Release Date: 2016-04-27
Genre:

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.