The Machine in the Garden

Author: Leo Marx
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 019513351X
Release Date: 1964
Genre: Literary Criticism

For more than 40 years, Marx's work focused on technology and culture in 19th- and 20th-century America. This edition celebrates the anniversary of Marx's classic text, and features a new Afterword on the process of writing the book. Illustrations.

The pilot and the passenger

Author: Leo Marx
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 019504875X
Release Date: 1988
Genre: Literary Criticism

Essays discuss the vernacular tradition, the literary view of technology, socialist criticism, and works by Melville, Frost and Twain

Landscapes of the New West

Author: Krista Comer
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 0807848131
Release Date: 1999
Genre: Literary Criticism

In the early 1970s, empowered by the civil rights and women's movements, a new group of women writers began speaking to the American public. Their topic, broadly defined, was the postmodern American West. By the mid-1980s, their combined works made for a bona fide literary groundswell in both critical and commercial terms. However, as Krista Comer notes, despite the attentions of publishers, the media, and millions of readers, literary scholars have rarely addressed this movement or its writers. Too many critics, Comer argues, still enamored of western images that are both masculine and antimodern, have been slow to reckon with the emergence of a new, far more "feminine," postmodern, multiracial, and urban west. Here, she calls for a redesign of the field of western cultural studies, one that engages issues of gender and race and is more self-conscious about space itself_especially that cherished symbol of western "authenticity," open landscape. Surveying works by Joan Didion, Wanda Coleman, Maxine Hong Kingston, Leslie Marmon Silko, Barbara Kingsolver, Pam Houston, Louise Erdrich, Sandra Cisneros, and Mary Clearman Blew, Comer shows how these and other contemporary women writers have mapped new geographical imaginations upon the cultural and social spaces of today's American West.

Civilizing the Machine

Author: John F. Kasson
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 0809016206
Release Date: 1999-05-17
Genre: History

A major theme in American history has been the desire to achieve a genuinely republican way of life that values liberty, order, and virtue. This work shows us how new technologies affected this drive for a republican civilization - a question as vital now as ever.

Locating American Studies

Author: Lucy Maddox
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 0801860563
Release Date: 1957
Genre: Education

Maddox has brought together works by a distinguished group of scholars which provide a useful window into the history and the evolution of the practice of American studies from its early, formational days to the present.

Back to nature

Author: Peter J. Schmitt
Publisher: Johns Hopkins Univ Pr
ISBN: UOM:39015056262168
Release Date: 1990
Genre: Architecture


Rereading the Machine in the Garden

Author: Eric Erbacher
Publisher: Campus Verlag
ISBN: 9783593501918
Release Date: 2014-11-06
Genre: Language Arts & Disciplines

The volume reexamines the trope of the intrusive machine and the regenerative pastoral garden, laid out fifty years ago by Leo Marx inThe Machine in the Garden, one of the founding texts of American Studies. Contributions explore the lasting influence of the trope in American culture and the arts, rereading it as a dialectics where nature is as much technologized as technology is naturalized. They trace this dialectic trope in filmic and literary representations of industrial, bureaucratic, and digital gardens; they explore its function in the aftermath of the civil war, the rural electrification during the New Deal, in landscape art, and in ethnic literatures; and they discuss the historical premises and lasting influence of Leo Marx's seminal study.

Feeling Mediated

Author: Brenton J. Malin
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9780814762790
Release Date: 2014-03-28
Genre: History

New technologies, whether text message or telegraph, inevitably raise questions about emotion. New forms of communication bring with them both fear and hope, on one hand allowing us deeper emotional connections and the ability to forge global communities, while on the other prompting anxieties about isolation and over-stimulation. Feeling Mediated investigates the larger context of such concerns, considering both how media technologies intersect with our emotional lives and how our ideas about these intersections influence how we think about and experience emotion and technology themselves. Drawing on extensive archival research, Brenton J. Malin explores the historical roots of much of our recent understanding of mediated feelings, showing how earlier ideas about the telegraph, phonograph, radio, motion pictures, and other once-new technologies continue to inform our contemporary thinking. With insightful analysis, Feeling Mediated explores a series of fascinating arguments about technology and emotion that became especially heated during the early 20th century. These debates, which carried forward and transformed earlier discussions of technology and emotion, culminated in a set of ideas that became institutionalized in the structures of American media production, advertising, social research, and policy, leaving a lasting impact on our everyday lives.

Making the Modern

Author: Terry Smith
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226763477
Release Date: 1994-01-01
Genre: Art

Smith reveals how this visual revolution played an instrumental role in the complex psychological, social, economic, and technological changes that came to be known as the second industrial revolution. From the role of visualization in the invention of the assembly line, to office and building design, to the corporate and lifestyle images that filled new magazines such as Life and Fortune, he traces the extent to which the second wave of industrialization engaged the visual arts to project a new iconology of progress.

Brooklyn Bridge

Author: Alan Trachtenberg
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226811158
Release Date: 1979-07-15
Genre: Photography

Investigates the continuing impact of the Brooklyn Bridge upon the American imagination, exploring both its symbolic significance as reflected in the works of Hart Crane and others and its importance as an engineering accomplishment

The Garden in the Machine

Author: Scott MacDonald
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520227387
Release Date: 2001
Genre: Performing Arts

"This book is MacDonald's magnum opus: it represents a deep immersion in and advocacy for independent, experimental cinema."--Patricia R. Zimmerman, author of States of Emergency: Documentaries, Wars, Democracies "This is a brilliant study--learned, authoritative, and often eloquent. One reads this book with astonishment at the wealth of thoughtful and playful and provocative work that has occurred in this medium--and astonishment too that most scholars of environmental literature and nature in the visual arts have had minimal contact with independent film and video. MacDonald provides an immensely valuable, readable overview of this field, profoundly relevant to my own work and that of many other contemporary ecocritics."--Scott Slovic, editor of ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment "The Garden in the Machine is clearly MacDonald's major work. It is very original and wide reaching especially in its analysis of the relationship of American avant-garde films to the poetry and painting of the native landscape. MacDonald's authority is evident everywhere: he probably knows more about most of the films he discusses than anyone alive."--P. Adams Sitney, author of Modernist Montage : The Obscurity of Vision in Cinema and Literature "The Garden in the Machine reflects Scott MacDonald's career-long lived engagement with avant-garde film and filmmakers. With deep respect for the artists and a rich, wide-ranging curiosity about the cultural histories that inform these films, MacDonald makes a powerful argument for why they should be screened, taught, and discussed within the wider context of American Studies. Throughout, MacDonald analyzes themes of race, history, personal and public memory, and the central role of avant-garde films in shaping our possible futures."--Angela Miller, author of Empire of the Eye: Landscape Representation and American Cultural Politics, 1825-1875

American Imperial Pastoral

Author: Rebecca Tinio McKenna
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226417936
Release Date: 2017-01-20
Genre: History

In 1904, renowned architect Daniel Burnham, the Progressive Era urban planner who famously “Made No Little Plans,” set off for the Philippines, the new US colonial acquisition. Charged with designing environments for the occupation government, Burnham set out to convey the ambitions and the dominance of the regime, drawing on neo-classical formalism for the Pacific colony. The spaces he created, most notably in the summer capital of Baguio, gave physical form to American rule and its contradictions. In American Imperial Pastoral, Rebecca Tinio McKenna examines the design, construction, and use of Baguio, making visible the physical shape, labor, and sustaining practices of the US’s new empire—especially the dispossessions that underwrote market expansion. In the process, she demonstrates how colonialists conducted market-making through state-building and vice-versa. Where much has been made of the racial dynamics of US colonialism in the region, McKenna emphasizes capitalist practices and design ideals—giving us a fresh and nuanced understanding of the American occupation of the Philippines.

Human Built World

Author: Thomas P. Hughes
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226120669
Release Date: 2005-05-13
Genre: Technology & Engineering

To most people, technology has been reduced to computers, consumer goods, and military weapons; we speak of "technological progress" in terms of RAM and CD-ROMs and the flatness of our television screens. In Human-Built World, thankfully, Thomas Hughes restores to technology the conceptual richness and depth it deserves by chronicling the ideas about technology expressed by influential Western thinkers who not only understood its multifaceted character but who also explored its creative potential. Hughes draws on an enormous range of literature, art, and architecture to explore what technology has brought to society and culture, and to explain how we might begin to develop an "ecotechnology" that works with, not against, ecological systems. From the "Creator" model of development of the sixteenth century to the "big science" of the 1940s and 1950s to the architecture of Frank Gehry, Hughes nimbly charts the myriad ways that technology has been woven into the social and cultural fabric of different eras and the promises and problems it has offered. Thomas Jefferson, for instance, optimistically hoped that technology could be combined with nature to create an Edenic environment; Lewis Mumford, two centuries later, warned of the increasing mechanization of American life. Such divergent views, Hughes shows, have existed side by side, demonstrating the fundamental idea that "in its variety, technology is full of contradictions, laden with human folly, saved by occasional benign deeds, and rich with unintended consequences." In Human-Built World, he offers the highly engaging history of these contradictions, follies, and consequences, a history that resurrects technology, rightfully, as more than gadgetry; it is in fact no less than an embodiment of human values.

Shakespeare s Caliban

Author: Alden T. Vaughan
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 052145817X
Release Date: 1993-05-28
Genre: Drama

Shakespeare's Caliban examines The Tempest's "savage and deformed slave" as a fascinating but ambiguous literary creation with a remarkably diverse history. The authors, one a historian and the other a Shakespearean, explore the cultural background of Caliban's creation in 1611 and his disparate metamorphoses to the present time.

Mountain Gloom and Mountain Glory

Author: Marjorie Hope Nicolson
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295975776
Release Date: 1997
Genre: Literary Criticism

To English poets and writers of the seventeenth century, as to their predecessors, mountains were ugly protuberances which disfigured nature and threatened the symmetry of earth; they were symbols God’s wrath. Yet, less than two centuries later the romantic poets sang in praise of mountain splendor, of glorious heights that stirred their souls to divine ecstasy. In this very readable and fascinating study, Marjorie Hope Nicolson considers the intellectual renaissance at the close of the seventeenth century that caused the shift from mountain gloom to mountain glory. She examines various writers from the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries and traces both the causes and the process of this drastic change in perception.