The Massacre at El Mozote

Author: Mark Danner
Publisher:
ISBN: 1862077851
Release Date: 2005
Genre: El Mozote (El Salvador)

The story of the 1989 massacre of civilians in El Salvadore by US-trained soldiers.

The El Mozote Massacre

Author: Leigh Binford
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 0816516626
Release Date: 1996
Genre: Social Science

"Through fieldwork among the surprisingly numerous survivors, the author reconstructs the recent social structure, culture, and history of the northeastern Salvadoran village of Segundo Montes before, during, and after the infamous massacre. She tries toplace anthropology squarely into political issues, but also focuses on the people's oral testimonies more than on her own ethnography, especially resisting the easy/total categorization of the survivors as victims"--Handbook of Latin American Studies, v.57.

America s Dirty Wars

Author: Russell Crandall
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781107003132
Release Date: 2014-04-28
Genre: History

This book examines the long, complex experience of American involvement in irregular warfare. It begins with the American Revolution in 1776 and chronicles big and small irregular wars for the next two and a half centuries. What is readily apparent in dirty wars is that failure is painfully tangible while success is often amorphous. Successfully fighting these wars often entails striking a critical balance between military victory and politics. America's status as a democracy only serves to make fighting - and, to a greater degree, winning - these irregular wars even harder. Rather than futilely insisting that Americans should not or cannot fight this kind of irregular war, Russell Crandall argues that we would be better served by considering how we can do so as cleanly and effectively as possible.

The Memorialization of Genocide

Author: Simone Gigliotti
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781317394167
Release Date: 2017-10-02
Genre: Political Science

Divided societies, tormented pasts, and unrepentant perpetrators. Why are some countries more intent on vanquishing uncomfortable pasts than others? How do public and often unsightly attempts at memorialisation both fail the victims and valorize their oppressors? This book offers fresh and original perspectives on dictatorship, fascism and victimization from the bloodiest decades in Europe’s, Australia’s and Central America’s colonial and modern history. Chapters include analyses of Francoist memorials in Spain, assessments of the El Mozote massacre in El Salvador, the forgetting of frontier colonial violence in Tasmania, Romania’s treatment of its Roma populations in the midst of Holocaust memorialisation in Bucharest’s urban development, and whether or not the Holocaust continues to serve as an instructional model or impossible aspiration for cross-cultural genocide memorialisation strategies. In an era of ongoing political, ethnic and religious conflict, and unrepentant insurgent activity around the world, this collection reminds readers that genocidal actions, wherever and whenever they occurred, must be held to account by more than rhetoric and concrete memory. This book was originally published as a special issue of the Journal of Genocide Research.

Recovery Analysis and Identification of Commingled Human Remains

Author: Bradley J. Adams
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1597453161
Release Date: 2008-02-23
Genre: Medical

Commingling of human remains presents an added challenge to all phases of the forensic process. This book brings together tools from diverse sources within forensic science to offer a set of comprehensive approaches to handling commingled remains. It details the recovery of commingled remains in the field, the use of triage in the assessment of commingling, various analytical techniques for sorting and determining the number of individuals, the role of DNA in the overall process, ethical considerations, and data management. In addition, the book includes case examples that illustrate techniques found to be successful and those that proved problematic.

Massacres and Morality

Author: Alex J. Bellamy
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199288427
Release Date: 2012-09-27
Genre: Philosophy

Why does the mass killing of civilians persist? Why do the perpetrators often escape criticism and punishment despite violating our most deeply held moral beliefs? Is the protection of civilians from these heinous crimes strengthening or weakening? Examining dozens of episodes of mass killing perpetrated by states since the French Revolution, this book argues that the principle that civilians ought not be deliberately killed has been engaged in a protractedstruggle against a variety of 'anti-civilian ideologies' which try to justify such killing. The book argues that although civilian immunity has won the battle of ideas against these ideologies, the battleitself continues as new ideologies emerge and the practice of condemning and punishing perpetrators is uneven and inconsistent - complicated by the politics of each new situation. As a result, whilst it has become much more difficult for states to get away with mass murder, it is still not entirely impossible for them to do so.

Hearts and Minds

Author: Hannah Gurman
Publisher: The New Press
ISBN: 9781595588432
Release Date: 2013-10-01
Genre: History

The first book of its kind, Hearts and Minds is a scathing response to the grand narrative of U.S. counterinsurgency, in which warfare is defined not by military might alone but by winning the "hearts and minds" of civilians. Dormant as a tactic since the days of the Vietnam War, in 2006 the U.S. Army drafted a new field manual heralding the resurrection of counterinsurgency as a primary military engagement strategy; counterinsurgency campaigns followed in Iraq and Afghanistan, despite the fact that counterinsurgency had utterly failed to account for the actual lived experiences of the people whose hearts and minds America had sought to win. Drawing on leading thinkers in the field and using key examples from Malaya, the Philippines, Vietnam, El Salvador, Iraq, and Afghanistan, Hearts and Minds brings a long-overdue focus on the many civilians caught up in these conflicts. Both urgent and timely, this important book challenges the idea of a neat divide between insurgents and the populations from which they emerge—and should be required reading for anyone engaged in the most important contemporary debates over U.S. military policy.

The Indispensable Zinn

Author: Timothy Patrick McCarthy
Publisher: New Press, The
ISBN: 9781595586933
Release Date: 2012-05-29
Genre: History

When Howard Zinn died in early 2010, millions of Americans mourned the loss of one of the nation’s foremost intellectual and political guides; a historian, activist, and truth-teller who, in the words of the New York Times’ Bob Herbert, “peel[ed] back the rosy veneer of much of American history to reveal sordid realities that had remained hidden for too long.” A collection designed to highlight Zinn’s essential writings, The Indispensable Zinn includes excerpts from Zinn’s bestselling A People’s History of the United States; his memoir, You Can’t Be Neutral on a Moving Train; his inspiring writings on the civil rights movement, and the full text of his celebrated play, Marx in Soho. Noted historian and activist Timothy Patrick McCarthy provides essential historical and biographical context for each selection. With an introduction from Zinn’s former Spellman College student and longtime friend Alice Walker, and an afterword by Noam Chomsky, The Indispensable Zinn is both a fitting tribute to the legacy of a man whose “work changed the way millions of people saw the past” (Noam Chomsky), and a powerful and accessible introduction for anyone coming to Zinn’s essential body of work for the first time.

El Mozote Massacre

Author: Frederic P. Miller
Publisher: Alphascript Publishing
ISBN: 6132848762
Release Date: 2010-09-29
Genre: History

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. The El Mozote Massacre took place in the village of El Mozote, in Morazán department, El Salvador, on December 11, 1981, when Salvadoran armed forces trained by the United States military killed at least 1000 civilians in an anti-guerrilla campaign during the Salvadoran Civil War.

Comfort

Author: Brett C. Hoover
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781101545638
Release Date: 2011-11-01
Genre: Religion

For readers of Kathleen Norris and Gretchen Rubin, a thought-provoking examination of the meaning of comfort Comfort is a universal human need. It's that craving to feel at one with the world we live in, warm (but not hot), protected (but not smothered), and secure (but not marooned) in what the future holds. Yet in our increasingly complex and overstressed world, we tend to overlook this important aspect in our lives. In Comfort: An Atlas for the Body and Soul, Brett C. Hoover, a scholar and Catholic priest, explores what comfort means-and it means different things to different people. He delves into the psychological, emotional, and spiritual facets of comfort and offers ways to rediscover it. With insight and humor, Hoover writes about the advantages and the pitfalls of seeking-and finding-comfort as he guides us towards the goal we should strive for: to find comfort in our own lives as we offer comfort to others. By turns lyrical and thought-provoking, funny and poignant, Comfort is full of engaging and unexpected insights in our very human search for personal fulfillment.

When Presidents Lie

Author: Eric Alterman
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101158875
Release Date: 2004-09-23
Genre: Political Science

“I’ve never read a better explanation of why presidents lie.”—John W. Dean, former counsel to President Nixon, The Washington Monthly By the end of the twentieth century, after decades of demoralizing revelations about the mendacity of their elected officials, most Americans had come to accept the fact that deception was not only an accepted practice in government but also pervasive. Whatever the reasons proposed to justify falsehoods—practicality, expediency, extraordinary conditions of wartime—the ability to lie convincingly had come to be regarded as almost being a qualification for holding public office. Although such behavior has come to be tolerated, little accounting has been taken of the effects of this institutionalized dishonesty in our political culture. When Presidents Lie: A History of Official Deception and Its Consequences addresses its subject not from a moral perspective, but from a pragmatic one, and discovers that in the end, honesty in government is, in fact, the best policy. Journalist and historian Eric Alterman’s meticulous research is drawn from primary-source materials, both government documents and the media reactions to the unfolding dramas, and demonstrates how these lies returned to haunt their tellers, or their successors, destroying the very policy the lie had been intended to support. Without exception, each of the presidents paid a high price for deception. So, too, did the nation. This is history at its most compelling, a balanced, eloquent, and revelatory chronicle of presidential dishonesty and its incalculable costs. In the fundamental questions it raises about leadership, accountability, and democracy, it is required reading for anyone who is concerned about America’s past—or her future.

The Abu Ghraib Effect

Author: Stephen F. Eisenman
Publisher: Reaktion Books
ISBN: 9781861895554
Release Date: 2007-04-25
Genre: Art

The photographs of torture at Abu Ghraib prison aroused worldwide condemnation—or did they? Opinion polls showed that most citizens of the United States were unmoved by the images. One reason for this relative lack of a public outcry may be the nature of the Abu Ghraib pictures themselves and what Stephen F. Eisenman terms “the Abu Ghraib effect.” By showing prisoners engaging in sexual acts, Eisenman asserts, the photos make the men look like enthusiastic participants in their own interrogation and torture. Further, these scenes repeat an ancient stereotype: the “pathos formula,” in which victims of war are shown welcoming their own punishment. In this highly original analysis, Eisenman shows the pathos formula at work in the Abu Ghraib photos, and he describes its long history, exploring the motif’s appearance in imperial Greek and Roman Art, in the sculpture and painting of Michelangelo, and in Baroque paintings of saints and martyrs. The author also describes the equally long history of artistic protest against the formula by such diverse artists as William Hogarth, Francisco Goya, Pablo Picasso, Ben Shahn, and Leon Golub. The Abu Ghraib Effect reveals how the pathos formula has dulled public responses to images of torture, and also urges a more effective use of political images in the fight against the so-called “war on terror.” “Eisenman’s concepts and questions constitute a challenging discourse on politics and art.” —Art in America “This brilliantly argued volume should be read by all art historians.”—Art Book “The Abu Ghraib Effect . . . traverses revolutionary terrain in its unraveling of the function of artistic metaphor in the justification of imperialist power.” —Media–Culture Review