The Persistence of the Color Line

Author: Randall Kennedy
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 9780307455550
Release Date: 2012
Genre: Political Science

A Harvard Law professor and best-selling author presents essays on the complex relationship between the 44th President and his African-American constituency, addressing such topics as Obama's responsibilities to citizens of different races and the nature of racial opposition to him. Reprint.

Life on the Color Line

Author: Gregory Howard Williams
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1440673330
Release Date: 1996-02-01
Genre: Social Science

Winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize “A triumph of storytelling as well as a triumph of spirit.”—Alex Kotlowitz, award-winning author of There Are No Children Here As a child in 1950s segregated Virginia, Gregory Howard Williams grew up believing he was white. But when the family business failed and his parents’ marriage fell apart, Williams discovered that his dark-skinned father, who had been passing as Italian-American, was half black. The family split up, and Greg, his younger brother, and their father moved to Muncie, Indiana, where the young boys learned the truth about their heritage. Overnight, Greg Williams became black. In this extraordinary and powerful memoir, Williams recounts his remarkable journey along the color line and illuminates the contrasts between the black and white worlds: one of privilege, opportunity and comfort, the other of deprivation, repression, and struggle. He tells of the hostility and prejudice he encountered all too often, from both blacks and whites, and the surprising moments of encouragement and acceptance he found from each. Life on the Color Line is a uniquely important book. It is a wonderfully inspiring testament of purpose, perseverance, and human triumph. “Heartbreaking and uplifting… a searing book about race and prejudice in America… brims with insights that only someone who has lived on both sides of the racial divide could gain.”—Cleveland Plain Dealer From the Trade Paperback edition.

Racism Without Racists

Author: Eduardo Bonilla-Silva
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1442202181
Release Date: 2010
Genre: Social Science

A fourth edition is now available. In the third edition of his highly acclaimed book, Bonilla-Silva continues to challenge color-blind thinking. He has now extended this challenge with a new chapter on Obama's election addressing the apparent miracle of a black man elected as the 44th President of the nation despite the fact that racial progress has stagnated since the 1980s and, in some areas, even regressed. In contrast to those who believe the election of President Obama is a watershed moment that signifies the beginning of a post-racial era in America, he suggests this development embodies the racial trends of the last 40 years including two he has addressed in this book: the rise of color-blind racism as the dominant racial ideology and the emergence of an apparently more flexible racial stratification system he characterizes as Latin America-like. Some material from previous editions, including 'Answers to Questions from Concerned Readers, ' 'What is to Be Done, ' and an Appendix detailing interview questions, is now available on the Rowman & Littlefield website through the Teaching/Learning Resources link.

Sport and the Color Line

Author: Patrick B. Miller
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 0415946115
Release Date: 2004
Genre: History

The year 2003 marks the one-hundredth anniversary of W.E.B. Du Bois' "Souls of Black Folk," in which he declared that "the color line" would be the problem of the twentieth century. Half a century later, Jackie Robinson would display his remarkable athletic skills in "baseball's great experiment." Now, "Sport and the Color Line" takes a look at the last century through the lens of sports and race, drawing together articles by many of the leading figures in Sport Studies to address the African American experience and the history of race relations. The history of African Americans in sport is not simple, and it certainly did not begin in 1947 when Jackie Robinson first donned a Brooklyn Dodgers uniform. The essays presented here examine the complexity of black American sports culture, from the organization of semi-pro baseball and athletic programs at historically black colleges and universities, to the careers of individual stars such as Jack Johnson and Joe Louis, to the challenges faced by black women in sports. What are today's black athletes doing in the aftermath of desegregation, or with the legacy of Muhammad Ali's political stance? The essays gathered here engage such issues, as well as the paradoxes of corporate sport and the persistence of scientific racism in the athletic realm.

Making Multiracials

Author: Kimberly McClain DaCosta
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 0804755469
Release Date: 2007
Genre: Social Science

Making Multiracials explains how a social movement emerged around mixed race identity in the 1990s and how it made "multiracial" a recognizable racial category in the United States.

Rethinking the Color Line

Author: Charles A. Gallagher
Publisher: SAGE Publications, Incorporated
ISBN: 1506394132
Release Date: 2018-08-28
Genre: Social Science

User-friendly without sacrificing intellectual or theoretical rigor, this popular anthology of current research examines contemporary issues and explores new approaches to the study of race and ethnic relations. The featured readings effectively engage students by helping them understand theories and concepts. The Sixth Edition has been thoroughly revised, with 17 new selectionsfrom the most current literature in this field.

Whitewashing Race

Author: Michael K. Brown
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520237063
Release Date: 2003-09-18
Genre: Social Science

The myth of a color-blind society is deconstructed in this powerful new look at race in America that consults sociologists, economists, criminologists, political scientists, and legal scholars in the search for answers to why so many white Americans think racism is no longer a problem. (Social Science)

Representing the Race

Author: Kenneth W. Mack
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674065307
Release Date: 2012-05-01
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

Profiles African American lawyers during the era of segregation and the civil rights movement, with an emphasis on the conflicts they felt between their identities as African Americans and their professional identities as lawyers.

The Myth of Race

Author: Robert Wald Sussman
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674745308
Release Date: 2014-10-06
Genre: Social Science

Although eugenics is now widely discredited, some groups and individuals claim a new scientific basis for old racist assumptions. Pondering the continuing influence of racist research and thought, despite all evidence to the contrary, Robert Sussman explains why—when it comes to race—too many people still mistake bigotry for science.

Hate Thy Neighbor

Author: Jeannine Bell
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9780814770917
Release Date: 2013-06-18
Genre: Law

Despite increasing racial tolerance and national diversity, neighborhood segregation remains a very real problem in cities across America. Scholars, government officials, and the general public have long attempted to understand why segregation persists despite efforts to combat it, traditionally focusing on the issue of “white flight,” or the idea that white residents will move to other areas if their neighborhood becomes integrated. In Hate Thy Neighbor, Jeannine Bell expands upon these understandings by investigating a little-examined but surprisingly prevalent problem of “move-in violence:” the anti-integration violence directed by white residents at minorities who move into their neighborhoods. Apprehensive about their new neighbors and worried about declining property values, these residents resort to extra-legal violence and intimidation tactics, often using vandalism and verbal harassment to combat what they view as a violation of their territory. Hate Thy Neighbor is the first work to seriously examine the role violence plays in maintaining housing segregation, illustrating how intimidation and fear are employed to force minorities back into separate neighborhoods and prevent meaningful integration. Drawing on evidence that includes in-depth interviews with ordinary citizens and analysis of Fair Housing Act cases, Bell provides a moving examination of how neighborhood racial violence is enabled today and how it harms not only the victims, but entire communities. By finally shedding light on this disturbing phenomenon, Hate Thy Neighbor not only enhances our understanding of how prevalent segregation and this type of hate-crime remain, but also offers insightful analysis of a complex mix of remedies that can work to address this difficult problem.

The Persistence of Whiteness

Author: Daniel Bernardi
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781135976453
Release Date: 2007-09-12
Genre: Performing Arts

The Persistence of Whiteness investigates the representation and narration of race in contemporary Hollywood cinema. Ideologies of class, ethnicity, gender, nation and sexuality are central concerns as are the growth of the business of filmmaking. Focusing on representations of Black, Asian, Jewish, Latina/o and Native Americans identities, this collection also shows how whiteness is a fact everywhere in contemporary Hollywood cinema, crossing audiences, authors, genres, studios and styles. Bringing together essays from respected film scholars, the collection covers a wide range of important films, including Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner, The Color Purple, Star Wars and The Lord of the Rings. Essays also consider genres from the western to blaxploitation and new black cinema; provocative filmmakers such as Melvin Van Peebles and Steven Spielberg and stars including Whoopi Goldberg and Jennifer Lopez. Daniel Bernardi provides an in-depth introduction, comprehensive bibliography and a helpful glossary of terms, thus providing students with an accessible and topical collection on race and ethnicity in contemporary cinema.

Christians and the Color Line

Author: Philip Luke Sinitiere
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199329502
Release Date: 2014-01
Genre: Religion

The essays in Christians and the Color Line complicate the research findings of Emerson and Smith's Divided by Faith (2000) and explore new areas of research that have opened in the years since its publication.

A People s History of the United States

Author: Howard Zinn
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781317325307
Release Date: 2015-08-12
Genre: History

This is a new edition of the radical social history of America from Columbus to the present. This powerful and controversial study turns orthodox American history upside down to portray the social turmoil behind the "march of progress". Known for its lively, clear prose as well as its scholarly research, A People's History is the only volume to tell America's story from the point of view of - and in the words of - America's women, factory workers, African-Americans, Native Americans, the working poor, and immigrant laborers. As historian Howard Zinn shows, many of America's greatest battles - the fights for fair wage, an eight-hour workday, child-labor laws, health and safety standards, universal suffrage, women's rights, racial equality - were carried out at the grassroots level, against bloody resistance. Covering Christopher Columbus's arrival through the Clinton years A People's History of the United States, which was nominated for the American Book Award in 1981, is an insightful analysis of the most important events in US history.

Shifting the Color Line

Author: Robert C. Lieberman
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0674007115
Release Date: 2001
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

"Shifting the Color Line" explores the historical and political roots of racial conflict in American welfare policy, beginning with the New Deal. Robert Lieberman demonstrates how racial distinctions were built into the very structure of the American welfare state.

The Education of Booker T Washington

Author: Michael Rudolph West
Publisher:
ISBN: 023113049X
Release Date: 2008-10-01
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

In this major reconsideration of Booker T. Washington's life and thought, Michael Rudolph West explores why Washington's ideas resonated so strongly in the post-Reconstruction era and considers their often negative influence on the ongoing struggle for equality in the United States. According to West, Washington's "race relations" offered a "solution" to the problem of racial oppression in a nation professing its belief in democracy. In practice, though, his theories lent support to the supposition that African Americans could prosper under Jim Crow without the normal levers by which other Americans pursued their interests. West contends that Washington did not seek to end the segregationist policies of southern states. Instead, he offered an ideology that would obscure the injustices of segregation and preserve some measure of racial peace. By embracing Washington's views, white Americans could then resolve the contradictions raised by segregation in a supposedly democratic society. This was (and is) Washington's legacy: a form of racial analysis, at once obvious and concealed, that continues to prohibit the realization of a truly democratic politics.