The Songs of the Gold Rush

Author: Richard A. Dwyer
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN:
Release Date: 1964
Genre: California

Eighty-eight songs as they were written and sung in the mining camps of California.

Days of Gold

Author: Karen Arlen
Publisher:
ISBN: 0964836254
Release Date: 1998-11-01
Genre: California

These are songs that were sung aboard ships and on wagon trains on the way to the gold fields.

Rock and Roll

Author: Maury Dean
Publisher: Algora Publishing
ISBN: 9780875862279
Release Date: 2003-01-01
Genre: Electronic books

An appreciation of Rock-n-Roll, song by song, from its roots and its inspriations to its divergent recent trends. A work of rough genius; DeanOCOs attempt to make connections though time and across genres is laudable."

Work Songs

Author: Ted Gioia
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822387688
Release Date: 2006-03-23
Genre: Music

All societies have relied on music to transform the experience of work. Song accompanied the farmer’s labors, calmed the herder’s flock, and set in motion the spinner’s wheel. Today this tradition continues. Music blares on the shop floor; song accompanies transactions in the retail store; the radio keeps the trucker going on the long-distance haul. Now Ted Gioia, author of several acclaimed books on the history of jazz, tells the story of work songs from prehistoric times to the present. Vocation by vocation, Gioia focuses attention on the rhythms and melodies that have attended tasks such as the cultivation of crops, the raising and lowering of sails, the swinging of hammers, the felling of trees. In an engaging, conversational writing style, he synthesizes a breathtaking amount of material, not only from songbooks and recordings but also from travel literature, historical accounts, slave narratives, folklore, labor union writings, and more. He draws on all of these to describe how workers in societies around the world have used music to increase efficiency, measure time, relay commands, maintain focus, and alleviate drudgery. At the same time, Gioia emphasizes how work songs often soar beyond utilitarian functions. The heart-wringing laments of the prison chain gang, the sailor’s shanties, the lumberjack’s ballads, the field hollers and corn-shucking songs of the American South, the pearl-diving songs of the Persian Gulf, the rich mbube a cappella singing of South African miners: Who can listen to these and other songs borne of toil and hard labor without feeling their sweep and power? Ultimately, Work Songs, like its companion volume Healing Songs, is an impassioned tribute to the extraordinary capacity of music to enter into day-to-day lives, to address humanity’s deepest concerns and most heartfelt needs.

What Was the Gold Rush

Author: Joan Holub
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781101610299
Release Date: 2013-02-07
Genre: Juvenile Nonfiction

In 1848, gold was discovered in California, attracting over 300,000 people from all over the world, some who struck it rich and many more who didn't. Hear the stories about the gold-seeking "forty-niners!" With black-and white illustrations and sixteen pages of photos, a nugget from history is brought to life!

The California Gold Rush

Author: Mark A. Eifler
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781317910213
Release Date: 2016-07-22
Genre: History

In January of 1848, James Marshall discovered gold at Sutter's Mill in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. For a year afterward, news of this discovery spread outward from California and started a mass migration to the gold fields. Thousands of people from the East Coast aspiring to start new lives in California financed their journey West on the assumption that they would be able to find wealth. Some were successful, many were not, but they all permanently changed the face of the American West. In this text, Mark Eifler examines the experiences of the miners, demonstrates how the gold rush affected the United States, and traces the development of California and the American West in the second half of the nineteenth century. This migration dramatically shifted transportation systems in the US, led to a more powerful federal role in the West, and brought about mining regulation that lasted well into the twentieth century. Primary sources from the era and web materials help readers comprehend what it was like for these nineteenth-century Americans who gambled everything on the pursuit of gold.

Gold Rush

Author: Jim Richards
Publisher: Fremantle Press
ISBN: 9781925164022
Release Date: 2016-09-01
Genre: Travel

When young Jim Richards left the army to make to chase a dream, he had no language skills, no money and no idea, just the kind of gold lust that has driven fortune hunters throughout history. And when he struck gold and diamonds in the remote rivers of Guyana, his problems and his success grew in equal measure. Jim Richards has done it all: dived for diamonds in the piranha-infested rivers of South America; discovered a fabulously rich goldmine in the Australian outback; got caught up in the world's biggest mining scam in Indonesia; and even started a gold rush in the war-torn jungles of Laos.

Chinese American Voices

Author: Judy Yung
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520243095
Release Date: 2006
Genre: History

"Skillfully selected, translated, and annotated, this compelling compendium of voices bear witness to the diversity and depth of the Chinese American experience and, significantly, its indispensable centrality to American life and history."--Gary Y. Okihiro, author of Common Ground: Reimagining American History "Here at last is a wide-ranging record of Chinese American experiences from the viewpoints of the players. Chinese American Voices is an impressive feat of scholarship, an indispensable reference, and a compelling read."--Ruthanne Lum McCunn, author of Thousand Pieces of Gold and The Moon Pearl "This anthology offers a virtual "Gam Saan" (Gold Mountain) of original sources. The stories burst with telling and re-affirm a vision of men and women as actors in history, who made themselves as Chinese Americans as they helped to make America itself."--Ronald Takaki, author of Strangers from a Different Shore: A History of Asian Americans "This volume of sixty-two annotated documents, many translated from Chinese for the first time, is a boon to faculty and students interested in Chinese American history, Asian American history, U.S. immigration history, and race and ethnic relations. The life stories, in particular, are appealing for students, the reading public, and scholars alike as they hear the voices of individuals long misunderstood, denigrated, and silenced. All of us owe a debt of gratitude to the three editors for their dedicated labor of love."--Sucheng Chan, author of Chinese American Transnationalism: The Flow of People, Resources, and Ideas between China and America during the Exclusion Era "This is a superb collection."--Roger Daniels, author of Guarding the Golden Door: American Immigration Policy and Immigrants since 1882

The California Gold Rush

Author: Gordon V. Axon
Publisher:
ISBN: UOM:39015002191743
Release Date: 1976-01-01
Genre: California

Discusses the California Gold Rush and its profound effect on the development of the state.

Gold Rush Capitalists

Author: Mark A. Eifler
Publisher: UNM Press
ISBN: 0826328229
Release Date: 2002
Genre: History

Sacramento, California, was one of the largest cities in the West during the later half of the nineteenth century. Situated between the bay and the Sierra foothills, Sacramento seemed to fit a pattern of natural urban growth that capitalized upon natural resources and transportation routes. The city was also the capital of one of the most powerful states in the nation, but oddly, it has received little attention from urban historians. As a supply center for gold rush miners in the mid-nineteenth century, Sacramento was visited daily by thousands of wide-eyed adventurers who wrote detailed letters and journals about their travels in the West. Hundreds of amateur reporters compiled a rich record of the early years of city development, providing a rare opportunity for researchers to trace the economic and social development of a western city. During the latter half of the nineteenth century, the city was also battered by a series of natural and man-made disasters and one of the most violent land riots in California's history. Through this turmoil, Sacramento's many resident and visiting observers commented on what they perceived as the strengths and weaknesses of its urban leaders in great detail, thus providing a window onto the seemingly daily struggle for leadership and authority in a boom city. Eifler takes the reader on a journey into early western urbanization with his study of Sacramento. He examines the earliest founding of the city by speculators looking to cash in on gold rush trade, uncovering the rampant competition between a handful of men intent on creating a city that would dominate the mining trade. The arrival of thousands of miners into the region, who had their own ideas about what role a city should play in an isolated mining frontier, provides another complication in Sacramento's growth as miners and city founders clashed on nearly every civic issue. Rising tensions between these groups erupted into open warfare just twenty months after the city's founding. Eifler analyzes the aftermath of the riot, which discredited both founders and miner/settlers and gave rise to a new urban commercial class removed from the labors of mining. Thus, Sacramento's residents sought to create stable urban institutions that could, hopefully, safely negotiate the travails of unrestricted commercialism. Gold Rush Capitalists is an engaging, valuable glimpse of western urban development through the eyes of classes and individuals often at odds with each other but never completely divorced.