Toleration in Conflict

Author: Rainer Forst
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521885775
Release Date: 2013-01-17
Genre: History

This book represents the most comprehensive historical and systematic study of the theory and practice of toleration ever written.

Toleration in Political Conflict

Author: Glen Newey
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781107040328
Release Date: 2013-10-03
Genre: Law

Glen Newey argues that toleration is not just desirable but, given the nature of politics, inescapable.

The Power of Tolerance

Author: Wendy Brown
Publisher: Series Cultural Inquiry
ISBN: 9783851327311
Release Date: 2014-03-01
Genre:

We invoke the ideal of tolerance in response to conflict, but what does it mean to answer conflict with a call for tolerance? Is tolerance a way of resolving conflicts or a means of sustaining them? Does it transform conflicts into productive tensions or does it perpetuate underlying power relations? To what extent does tolerance hide its involvement with power and act as a form of de-politicization? Two major theoreticians of tolerance debate the uses and misuses of tolerance in a dialogue that is rich in critical and conceptual reflections on power, justice, discourse, rationality, and identity.

Choreographies of Shared Sacred Sites

Author: Elazar Barkan
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231538060
Release Date: 2014-11-11
Genre: Political Science

This anthology explores the dynamics of shared religious sites in Turkey, the Balkans, Palestine/Israel, Cyprus, and Algeria, indicating where local and national stakeholders maneuver between competition and cooperation, coexistence and conflict. Contributors probe the notion of coexistence and the logic that underlies centuries of "sharing," exploring when and why sharing gets interrupted—or not—by conflict, and the policy consequences. These essays map the choreographies of shared sacred spaces within the framework of state-society relations, juxtaposing a site's political and religious features and exploring whether sharing or contestation is primarily religious or politically motivated. Although religion and politics are intertwined phenomena, the contributors to this volume understand the category of "religion" and the "political" as devices meant to distinguish between the theological and confessional aspects of religion and the political goals of groups. Their comparative approach better represents the transition in some cases of sites into places of hatred and violence, while in other instances they remain noncontroversial. The essays clearly delineate the religious and political factors that contribute to the context and causality of conflict at these sites and draw on history and anthropology to shed light on the often rapid switch from relative tolerance to distress to peace and calm.

The Right to Justification

Author: Rainer Forst
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231519588
Release Date: 2011-12-27
Genre: Philosophy

Contemporary philosophical pluralism recognizes the inevitability and legitimacy of multiple ethical perspectives and values, making it difficult to isolate the higher-order principles on which to base a theory of justice. Rising up to meet this challenge, Rainer Forst, a leading member of the Frankfurt School's newest generation of philosophers, conceives of an "autonomous" construction of justice founded on what he calls the basic moral right to justification. Forst begins by identifying this right from the perspective of moral philosophy. Then, through an innovative, detailed critical analysis, he ties together the central components of social and political justice freedom, democracy, equality, and toleration and joins them to the right to justification. The resulting theory treats "justificatory power" as the central question of justice, and by adopting this approach, Forst argues, we can discursively work out, or "construct," principles of justice, especially with respect to transnational justice and human rights issues. As he builds his theory, Forst engages with the work of Anglo-American philosophers such as John Rawls, Ronald Dworkin, and Amartya Sen, and critical theorists such as Jürgen Habermas, Nancy Fraser, and Axel Honneth. Straddling multiple subjects, from politics and law to social protest and philosophical conceptions of practical reason, Forst brilliantly gathers contesting claims around a single, elastic theory of justice.

Toleration

Author: Bican Sahin
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739147412
Release Date: 2010-06-23
Genre: Political Science

More than anything, diversity is what characterizes societies of the 21st century. Our contemporary societies are marked by ethnic, religious, racial, ideological, moral, and sexual diversity. Cultural, moral, and ideological pluralism is a fact of our lives. While some people see this phenomenon as a source of richness and thus welcome it, others feel threatened by it. Those who feel threatened have two options before them; they will either learn how to live with diversity or look for ways to suppress it. While, this latter option causes social conflict, the former ameliorates social conflict. This option is called 'toleration.' Toleration: The Liberal Virtue is a defense of toleration as a remedy to societal conflict caused by differences. It examines four prominent grounds of toleration: skepticism, prudence, autonomy, and conscience which are illustrated through the works of four pioneering liberals, namely, Michel de Montaigne, John Locke, John Stuart Mill, and Pierre Bayle, respectively.

Toleration Neutrality and Democracy

Author: Dario Castiglione
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9789401702416
Release Date: 2013-03-09
Genre: Political Science

This book brings together a group of international scholars, many of whom have already contributed to the debate on toleration, and who are offering fresh thoughts and approaches to it. The essays of this collection are written from a variety of perspectives: historical, analytical, normative, and legal. Yet, all authors share a concern with the sharpening of our understanding of the reasons for toleration as well as with making them relevant to the way in which we live with others in our modern and diverse societies.

Toleration and Identity

Author: Ingrid Creppell
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781136061462
Release Date: 2013-05-13
Genre: Philosophy

Recently, there has been a notable rise in interest in the idea of "toleration", a rise that Ingrid Creppell argues comes more from distressing political developments than positive ones, and almost all of them are related to issues of identity: rampant genocide in the 20th Century, the resurgence of religious fundamentalism around the world; and ethnic-religious wars in Eastern Europe and the Middle East. In Toleration and Identity, Creppell argues that a contemporary ethic of toleration must include recognition of identity issues, and that the traditional liberal ideal of toleration is not sufficiently understood if we define it strictly as one of individual rights and freedom beliefs. Moving back and forth between contemporary debates and the foundational writings of Bodin, Montaigne, Lock, and Defoe, Toleration and Identity provides a fresh perspective on two key ideas deeply connected to current philosophical debates and political issues.

The Culture of Toleration in Diverse Societies

Author: Catriona McKinnon
Publisher: Manchester University Press
ISBN: 0719062322
Release Date: 2003
Genre: Political Science

Although the idea of toleration has been widely explored, there isreluctance to acknowledge the new meaning that current debates ontoleration have when compared with those in the early modern period andwith subsequent discussions about pluralism and freedom of expression.In this book, a group of distinguished authors explore thecomplexities emerging from the new debate. They reflect thecross-thematic and cross-disciplinary nature of such discussions,dissecting a number of debates such as liberalism and communitarianism,public and private, multiculturalism and the politics of identity.Specific issues considered include religious discrimination inemployment, city life and community, social ethos, and reason andethics.

How Do You Know

Author: Russell Hardin
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400830664
Release Date: 2014-04-24
Genre: Philosophy

How do ordinary people come to know or believe what they do? We need an account of this process to help explain why people act as they do. You might think I am acting irrationally--against my interest or my purpose--until you realize that what you know and what I know differ significantly. My actions, given my knowledge, might make eminently good sense. Of course, this pushes our problem back one stage to assess why someone knows or believes what they do. That is the focus of this book. Russell Hardin supposes that people are not usually going to act knowingly against their interests or other purposes. To try to understand how they have come to their knowledge or beliefs is therefore to be charitable in assessing their rationality. Hardin insists on such a charitable stance in the effort to understand others and their sometimes objectively perverse actions. Hardin presents an essentially economic account of what an individual can come to know and then applies this account to many areas of ordinary life: political participation, religious beliefs, popular knowledge of science, liberalism, culture, extremism, moral beliefs, and institutional knowledge. All of these can be enlightened by the supposition that people are attempting reasonable actions under the severe constraints of acquiring better knowledge when they face demands that far outstretch their possibilities.

Toleration and Its Limits

Author: Melissa S. Williams
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814794599
Release Date: 2008-03-01
Genre: Philosophy

Toleration has a rich tradition in Western political philosophy. It is, after all, one of the defining topics of political philosophy—historically pivotal in the development of modern liberalism, prominent in the writings of such canonical figures as John Locke and John Stuart Mill, and central to our understanding of the idea of a society in which individuals have the right to live their own lives by their own values, left alone by the state so long as they respect the similar interests of others. Toleration and Its Limits, the latest addition to the NOMOS series, explores the philosophical nuances of the concept of toleration and its scope in contemporary liberal democratic societies. Editors Melissa S. Williams and Jeremy Waldron carefully compiled essays that address the tradition’s key historical figures; its role in the development and evolution of Western political theory; its relation to morality, liberalism, and identity; and its limits and dangers. Contributors: Lawrence A. Alexander, Kathryn Abrams, Wendy Brown, Ingrid Creppell, Noah Feldman, Rainer Forst, David Heyd, Glyn Morgan, Glen Newey, Michael A. Rosenthal, Andrew Sabl, Steven D. Smith, and Alex Tuckness.

Locke and Rousseau

Author: Laurie M. Johnson
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 9780739147870
Release Date: 2012
Genre: History

Johnson continues her analysis of the place of honor in modernity with a close examination of honor s treatment by two Enlightenment philosophers: Locke and Rousseau, concluding that Enlightenment thought is inherently problematic when it comes to developing moral obligation. Political scientists, students of philosophy, and communitarians alike will find intriguing questions in this book, which calls on us to recognize the flaws of the Enlightenment liberalism that not only determines how we govern ourselves, but how we think about our family, society, and economy."

Toleration as Recognition

Author: Anna Elisabetta Galeotti
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139432516
Release Date: 2002-03-14
Genre: Philosophy

In this 2002 book, Anna Elisabetta Galeotti examines the most intractable problems which toleration encounters and argues that what is really at stake is not religious or moral disagreement but the unequal status of different social groups. Liberal theories of toleration fail to grasp this and consequently come up with normative solutions that are inadequate when confronted with controversial cases. Galeotti proposes, as an alternative, toleration as recognition, which addresses the problem of according equal respect to groups as well as equal liberty to individuals. She offers an interpretation that is both a revision and an expansion of liberal theory, in which toleration constitutes an important component not only of a theory of justice, but also of the politics of identity. Her study will appeal to a wide range of readers in political philosophy, political theory, and law.

Religion Identity and Conflict in Britain From the Restoration to the Twentieth Century

Author: Frances Knight
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781317067238
Release Date: 2016-04-08
Genre: History

The British state between the mid-seventeenth century to the early twentieth century was essentially a Christian state. Christianity permeated society, defining the rites of passage - baptism, first communion, marriage and burial - that shaped individual lives, providing a sense of continuity between past, present and future generations, and informing social institutions and voluntary associations. Yet this religious conception of state and society was also the source of conflict. The Restoration of the monarchy in 1660 brought limited toleration for Protestant Dissenters, who felt unable to worship in the established Church, and there were challenges to faith raised by biblical and historical scholarship, science, moral questioning and social dislocations and unrest. This book brings together a distinguished team of authors who explore the interactions of religion, politics and culture that shaped and defined modern Britain. They consider expressions of civic consciousness in the expanding towns and cities, the growth of Welsh national identity, movements for popular education and temperance reform, and the influence of organised sport, popular journalism, and historical writing in defining national life. Most importantly, the contributors highlight the vital role of religious faith and religious institutions in the understanding of the modern British state.