Touching Feeling

Author: Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822330156
Release Date: 2003-01-17
Genre: Literary Collections

DIVA collection of essays examining theories of affect and how they relate to issues of performance and performativity./div

A Dialogue on Love

Author: Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807029238
Release Date: 2000
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

In this account of how we arrive at love, the author tells how she warily commits to a male therapist who shares little of her cultural and intellectual world. Their improvized relationship is as unexpectedly pleasurable as her writing is unconventional.

Performativity and Performance

Author: Andrew Parker
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781135207571
Release Date: 2013-11-05
Genre: Art

From the age of Aristotle to the age of AIDS, writers, thinkers, performers and activists have wresteled with what "performance" is all about. At the same moment, "performativity"--a new concept in language theory--has become a ubiquitous term in literary studies. This volume grapples with the nature of these two key terms whose traces can be found everywhere: in the theatre, in the streets, in philosophy, in questions of race and gender, and in the sentences we speak.

Shame and Its Sisters

Author: Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822316943
Release Date: 1995
Genre: Psychology

The question of affect is central to critical theory, psychology, politics, and the entire range of the humanities; but no discipline, including psychoanalysis, has offered a theory of affect that would be rich enough to account for the delicacy and power, the evanescence and durability, the bodily rootedness and the cultural variability of human emotion. Silvan Tomkins (1911–1991) was one of the most radical and imaginative psychologists of the twentieth century. In Affect, Imagery, Consciousness, a four-volume work published over the last thirty years of his life, Tomkins developed an ambitious theory of affect steeped in cybernetics and systems theory as well as in psychoanalysis, ethology, and neuroscience. The implications of his conceptually daring and phenomenologically suggestive theory are only now—in the context of postmodernism—beginning to be understood. With Shame and Its Sisters, editors Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick and Adam Frank make available for the first time an engaging and accessible selection of Tomkins's work. Featuring intensive examination of several key affects, particularly shame and anger, this volume contains many of Tomkins's most haunting, diagnostically incisive, and theoretically challenging discussions. An introductory essay by the editors places Tomkins's work in the context of postwar information technologies and will prompt a reexamination of some of the underlying assumptions of recent critical work in cultural studies and other areas of the humanities. The text is also accompanied by a biographical sketch of Tomkins by noted psychologist Irving E. Alexander, Tomkins's longtime friend and collaborator.

Fat Art Thin Art

Author: Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822382652
Release Date: 1994-08-09
Genre: Poetry

Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick is best known as a cultural and literary critic, as one of the primary forces behind the development of queer and gay/lesbian studies, and as author of several influential books: Tendencies, Epistemology of the Closet, and Between Men: English Literature and Male Homosocial Desire. The publication of Fat Art, Thin Art, Sedgwick’s first volume of poetry, opens up another dimension of her continuing project of crossing and re-crossing the electrified boundaries between theory, lyric, and narrative. Embodying a decades-long adventure, the poems collected here offer the most accessible and definitive formulations to appear anywhere in Sedgwick’s writing on some characteristic subjects and some new ones: passionate attachments within and across genders; queer childhoods of many kinds; the performativity of a long, unconventional marriage; depressiveness, hilarity, and bliss; grave illness; despised and magnetic bodies and bodily parts. In two long fictional poems, a rich narrative momentum engages readers in the mysterious places—including Victorian novels—where characters, sexualities, and fates are unmade and made. Sedgwick’s poetry opens an unfamiliar, intimate, daring space that steadily refigures not only what a critic may be, but what a poem can do.

After Sex

Author: Janet Halley
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822349099
Release Date: 2011
Genre: Literary Criticism

Prominent participants in the development of queer theory explore the field in relation to their own intellectual itineraries, reflecting on its accomplishments, limitations, and critical potential.

The Affect Theory Reader

Author: Melissa Gregg
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822347767
Release Date: 2010-11-12
Genre: Literary Criticism

A collection of essays on affect theory by groundbreaking scholars in the field

Ordinary Affects

Author: Kathleen Stewart
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822390404
Release Date: 2007-08-30
Genre: Social Science

Ordinary Affects is a singular argument for attention to the affective dimensions of everyday life and the potential that animates the ordinary. Known for her focus on the poetics and politics of language and landscape, the anthropologist Kathleen Stewart ponders how ordinary impacts create the subject as a capacity to affect and be affected. In a series of brief vignettes combining storytelling, close ethnographic detail, and critical analysis, Stewart relates the intensities and banalities of common experiences and strange encounters, half-spied scenes and the lingering resonance of passing events. While most of the instances rendered are from Stewart’s own life, she writes in the third person in order to reflect on how intimate experiences of emotion, the body, other people, and time inextricably link us to the outside world. Stewart refrains from positing an overarching system—whether it’s called globalization or neoliberalism or capitalism—to describe the ways that economic, political, and social forces shape individual lives. Instead, she begins with the disparate, fragmented, and seemingly inconsequential experiences of everyday life to bring attention to the ordinary as an integral site of cultural politics. Ordinary affect, she insists, is registered in its particularities, yet it connects people and creates common experiences that shape public feeling. Through this anecdotal history—one that poetically ponders the extremes of the ordinary and portrays the dense network of social and personal connections that constitute a life—Stewart asserts the necessity of attending to the fleeting and changeable aspects of existence in order to recognize the complex personal and social dynamics of the political world.

Between Men

Author: Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231541046
Release Date: 2015-10-20
Genre: Literary Criticism

First published in 1985, Between Men challenged old ways of reading while articulating critical byways for two emerging disciplines. Its iconoclastic approach gave queer studies and gender studies scholars further reason to crack open the canon, scrutinize its contents, and add unconventional texts on sound theoretical grounds. Striking a devastating blow to the hegemony of heteronormative critique, it opened not only literature but also politics, religion, society, and culture to broader investigations of power, desire, and sex. Between Men still has much more to tell us, and much work left to do. It has kept pace with Western society’s evolving ideas of and debates on gender and sexuality and provides insight into its recent conservative and religious turns. With a new foreword by Wayne Koestenbaum emphasizing the work’s ongoing importance, Between Men begins with Shakespeare’s Sonnets and moves through Wycherley’s The Country Wife, Sterne’s A Sentimental Journey, Hogg’s Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner, Tennyson’s The Princess, Eliot’s Adam Bede, Thackeray’s The History of Henry Esmond, Esq., and Dickens’s Our Mutual Friend and The Mystery of Edwin Drood, among many other texts and critiques. Sedgwick’s landmark book remains a key analysis of homosocial desire in Western literature for any reader curious about the subject’s claim to legitimacy.

The Weather in Proust

Author: Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822351580
Release Date: 2011-12-20
Genre: Literary Collections

At the time of her death in after a long battle with cancer, Eve Sedgwick had been working on a book on affect and Proust, and on the psychoanalyst Melanie Klein. This volume, edited by Jonathan Goldberg, brings together a collection of her last work.

Feeling Backward

Author: Heather Love
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674032392
Release Date: 2009-03-31
Genre: Literary Criticism

'Feeling Backward' weighs the cost of the contemporary move to the mainstream in lesbian and gay culture. It makes an effort to value aspects of historical gay experience that now threaten to disappear, branded as embarrassing evidence of the bad old days before Stonewall. Love argues that instead of moving on, we need to look backward.

Ugly Feelings

Author: Sianne NGAI
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674971349
Release Date: 2009-06-30
Genre: Literary Criticism

Ngai mobilizes the aesthetics of unprestigious negative affects such as irritation, envy, and disgust to investigate not only ideological and representational dilemmas in literature--with a particular focus on those inflected by gender and race--but also blind spots in contemporary literary and cultural criticism. Her work maps a major intersection of literary studies, media and cultural studies, feminist studies, and aesthetic theory.

Beautiful Bottom Beautiful Shame

Author: Kathryn Bond Stockton
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822337967
Release Date: 2006-07-19
Genre: Literary Criticism

DIVThe relationship between black queer subjects and debasement as portrayed within popular culture texts and films./div

Depression

Author: Ann Cvetkovich
Publisher: Duke University Press Books
ISBN: 0822352230
Release Date: 2012-11-05
Genre: Social Science

In Depression: A Public Feeling, Ann Cvetkovich combines memoir and critical essay in search of ways of writing about depression as a cultural and political phenomenon that offer alternatives to medical models. She describes her own experience of the professional pressures, creative anxiety, and political hopelessness that led to intellectual blockage while she was finishing her dissertation and writing her first book. Building on the insights of the memoir, in the critical essay she considers the idea that feeling bad constitutes the lived experience of neoliberal capitalism. Cvetkovich draws on an unusual archive, including accounts of early Christian acedia and spiritual despair, texts connecting the histories of slavery and colonialism with their violent present-day legacies, and utopian spaces created from lesbian feminist practices of crafting. She herself seeks to craft a queer cultural analysis that accounts for depression as a historical category, a felt experience, and a point of entry into discussions about theory, contemporary culture, and everyday life. Depression: A Public Feeling suggests that utopian visions can reside in daily habits and practices, such as writing and yoga, and it highlights the centrality of somatic and felt experience to political activism and social transformation.

Epistemology of the Closet

Author: Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520254060
Release Date: 2008-01-17
Genre: Literary Criticism

Since the late 1980s, queer studies and theory have become vital to the intellectual and political life of the United States. This has been due, in no small degree, to the influence of Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick's critically acclaimed Epistemology of the Closet. Working from classic texts of European and American writers—including Melville, James, Nietzsche, Proust, and Wilde—Sedgwick analyzes a turn-of-the-century historical moment in which sexual orientation became as important a demarcation of personhood as gender had been for centuries. In her preface to this updated edition Sedgwick places the book both personally and historically, looking specifically at the horror of the first wave of the AIDS epidemic and its influence on the text.