Trespassers on Our Own Land

Author: Mike Scarborough
Publisher: Dog Ear Publishing
ISBN: 9781457505843
Release Date: 2011-10
Genre: History

Juan P. Valdez was born May 25, 1938 in Canjilon, New Mexico, the second of Amarante and Philomena Valdez' seven children. Juan's father took him out of school after the third grade to help with the raising of crops and tending of livestock necessary to support the family. After having been continuously denied grazing permits by the U. S. Forest Service it was necessary for Juan to sneak his family's cattle on and off the forest pastures on a daily basis. While in his mid-twenties Juan met Reies Lopez Tijerina, a charismatic former preacher who was traveling from village to village in Northern New Mexico speaking out about how the United States had stolen hundreds of thousands of acres of grant lands that were supposed to have been protected by the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. Juan was the first of eight members of Tijerina's Alianza to enter the Rio Arriba County courthouse on June 5, 1967 in a failed attempt to arrest the local district attorney, Alfonso Sanchez. Ironically, the judge in the courthouse that day was J. M. Scarborough, the father of Mike Scarborough who would wind up assisting Juan in the telling of his family history. Trespassers On Our Own Land is the history of the Valdez family from the time Spain granted Juan Bautista Valdez, Juan's great, great, great-grandfather an interest in a land grant located around the present village of Canones, New Mexico. Mike Scarborough grew up in Espanola, sixty miles south of where Juan grew up. After having spent eight years in the United States Air Force, Mike returned to New Mexico, attended college and law school, and practiced law in the area for twenty-five years. Some years ago he was asked by his good friend, Juan Valdez, to help write Juan's family history. Mike recently completed a five year study of Juan's family history and the period during the late 1800s and early 1900s when the United States government chose to claim ownership of million of acres of then existing land grants and to deny the settlers who had lived on them for over eighty years their legitimate right to use the land. Trespassers on Our Own Land is the result of his research."

Rio Arriba A New Mexico County

Author: Robert J. Torrez
Publisher: BookBaby
ISBN: 9781936744855
Release Date: 2010-03-01
Genre: History

Rio arriba. In Spanish, the lower case rio arriba stands for the “upper river,” that portion of northern New Mexico that straddles the Rio del Norte, the historic name of the Rio Grande. In the upper case, they stand for Rio Arriba County, a geopolitical entity that constitutes a small portion of the historic rio arriba. The words define a vast portion of New Mexico that extends from the historic villa of Santa Fe north into the San Luis Valley of today’s southern Colorado. Former New Mexico State Historian Robert J. Tórrez, Robert Trapp, long-time owner and publisher of Española’s Rio Grande Sun, and eight additional authors have come together to examine the long and complex history of this rio arriba. Rio Arriba: A New Mexico County reviews the history of this fascinating and unique area. The authors provide us an overview of its primordial beginnings (that left us the fossilized remains of coelophysis, our official state fossil), introduce us to the Tewa peoples that established the county’s first permanent settlements, as discuss the role the Navajo, Ute, and Jicarilla Apache played in the region’s history. As the history unfolds, the reader learns about the Spanish conquistadores and later-arriving Americans, their often contentious relations with the Native American peoples, and how the communities they established and the institutions they brought with them helped shape the Rio Arriba County of today. This book has been a long time coming. Of the thousands of books published on New Mexico’s long and varied history, none have attempted to tell the history of Rio Arriba County. Rio Arriba County was formally established January 9, 1852, one of seven original counties organized when New Mexico became a United States territory. It is a vast land mass nearly twice the size of the combined states of Delaware and Rhode Island. But its history predates 1852. It is a story of good times and hard times; of land grants, violence and yes, corruption in a remote area where the family was all-important as was the feeding of that family.

Tijerina and the Land Grants

Author: Patricia Bell Blawis
Publisher: New York : International Publishers
ISBN: UTEXAS:059173018673265
Release Date: 1971
Genre: Land grants


Fighting on Two Fronts

Author: James E. Westheider
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9780814793244
Release Date: 1999-04-01
Genre: History

Not only a highly significant contribution to the debate about masculinity, this outstanding volume breaks new ground in psychological theorizing generally. Tatham's passionate and disciplined text will set the agenda for the 1990's. -Andrew Samuels, author of The Father Tatham combines innovative psychological insight with the imaginative language of a poet. -Dr. Mario Jacoby, Ph. D., C. J. Jung Institute, Zurich In the Makings of Maleness, Jungian analyst Peter Tatham argues that the time for the hero as a model for maleness is past, and suggests that many of the difficulties between men and women, as well as the patriarchal slant of our culture, result from an over reliance upon the heroic as an archetypal stance that underlies consciousness. What maleness needs today is not merely to be more aware of its female counterpart, but to develop a different understanding of its own male nature. As a model more in keeping with the epoch and its needs, Tatham puts forward this archetypal image in the person and story of Daedalus, the master-craftsman of Greek mythology. Peter Tatham, by overturning various stereotypical positions, frees the reader to examine the notion that there can exist many different kinds of maleness.

Properties of Violence

Author: David Correia
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 9780820332840
Release Date: 2013-03-01
Genre: Social Science

DIVThrough the compelling story of the Tierra Amarilla conflict, David Correia examines how law and property, in general, and a Mexican-period land grant in northern New Mexico, in particular, have been constituted through violence and social struggle. Spain and Mexico populated what is today New Mexico through large common property land grants to sheepherders and agriculturalists. After the U.S.-Mexican War the area saw rampant land speculation and dubious property adjudication with nearly all the grants being rejected by U.S. courts or acquired by land speculators. Of all the land grant conflicts in New Mexico's history, Tierra Amarilla is one of the most sensational, with numerous nineteenth-century speculators ranking among the state's political and economic elite and a remarkable pattern of resistance to land loss by heirs in the twentieth century. Correia narrates a long and largely unknown history of property conflict in Tierra Amarilla characterized by nearly constant violence—night riding and fence cutting, pitched gun battles, and tanks rumbling along the rutted dirt roads of northern New Mexico. The legal geography he constructs is one that includes a remarkable cast of characters: millionaire sheep barons, Spanish anarchists, hooded Klansmen, Puerto Rican freedom fighters—or as J. Edgar Hoover, another of the characters in Correia's story would have called them, "terrorists." By placing property and law at the center of his study, Properties of Violence first reveals and then examines a central irony: violence is not the opposite of law but rather is essential to its operation./div

Where the Salmon Run

Author: Trova Heffernan
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 9780295997957
Release Date: 2017-05-01
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

Billy Frank Jr. was an early participant in the fight for tribal fishing rights during the 1960s. Roughed up, belittled, and handcuffed on the riverbank, he emerged as one of the most influential Northwest Indians in modern history. His efforts helped bring about the 1974 ruling by Federal Judge George H. Boldt affirming Northwest tribal fishing rights and allocating half the harvestable catch to them. Today, he continues to support Indian country and people by working to protect salmon and restore the environment. Where the Salmon Run tells the life story of Billy Frank Jr., from his father's influential tales, through the difficult and contentious days of the Fish Wars, to today. Based on extensive interviews with Billy, his family, close advisors, as well as political allies and former foes, and the holdings of Washington State's cultural institutions, we learn about the man behind the legend, and the people who helped him along the way.

Plunder

Author: Ugo Mattei
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9780470695807
Release Date: 2008-04-30
Genre: Social Science

Plunder examines the dark side of the Rule of Law and explores how it has been used as a powerful political weapon by Western countries in order to legitimize plunder – the practice of violent extraction by stronger political actors victimizing weaker ones. Challenges traditionally held beliefs in the sanctity of the Rule of Law by exposing its dark side Examines the Rule of Law's relationship with 'plunder' – the practice of violent extraction by stronger political actors victimizing weaker ones – in the service of Western cultural and economic domination Provides global examples of plunder: of oil in Iraq; of ideas in the form of Western patents and intellectual property rights imposed on weaker peoples; and of liberty in the United States Dares to ask the paradoxical question – is the Rule of Law itself illegal?

The Mismeasure of Desire

Author: David E. Stannard
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199838984
Release Date: 1993-11-18
Genre: Psychology

For four hundred years--from the first Spanish assaults against the Arawak people of Hispaniola in the 1490s to the U.S. Army's massacre of Sioux Indians at Wounded Knee in the 1890s--the indigenous inhabitants of North and South America endured an unending firestorm of violence. During that time the native population of the Western Hemisphere declined by as many as 100 million people. Indeed, as historian David E. Stannard argues in this stunning new book, the European and white American destruction of the native peoples of the Americas was the most massive act of genocide in the history of the world. Stannard begins with a portrait of the enormous richness and diversity of life in the Americas prior to Columbus's fateful voyage in 1492. He then follows the path of genocide from the Indies to Mexico and Central and South America, then north to Florida, Virginia, and New England, and finally out across the Great Plains and Southwest to California and the North Pacific Coast. Stannard reveals that wherever Europeans or white Americans went, the native people were caught between imported plagues and barbarous atrocities, typically resulting in the annihilation of 95 percent of their populations. What kind of people, he asks, do such horrendous things to others? His highly provocative answer: Christians. Digging deeply into ancient European and Christian attitudes toward sex, race, and war, he finds the cultural ground well prepared by the end of the Middle Ages for the centuries-long genocide campaign that Europeans and their descendants launched--and in places continue to wage--against the New World's original inhabitants. Advancing a thesis that is sure to create much controversy, Stannard contends that the perpetrators of the American Holocaust drew on the same ideological wellspring as did the later architects of the Nazi Holocaust. It is an ideology that remains dangerously alive today, he adds, and one that in recent years has surfaced in American justifications for large-scale military intervention in Southeast Asia and the Middle East. At once sweeping in scope and meticulously detailed, American Holocaust is a work of impassioned scholarship that is certain to ignite intense historical and moral debate.

Post Colonial Studies The Key Concepts

Author: Bill Ashcroft
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781134544219
Release Date: 2003-12-16
Genre: Literary Criticism

First Published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

The Explorers

Author: Richard F. Pourade
Publisher:
ISBN: UCSD:31822013514583
Release Date: 1960
Genre: California

Story of the discovery of San Diego in 1542 by Cabrillo, emphasizing the role of the padres who explored the region.

Edible Insects

Author: Arnold van Huis
Publisher: Food & Agriculture Org
ISBN: 9251075956
Release Date: 2013
Genre: Business & Economics

Edible insects have always been a part of human diets, but in some societies there remains a degree of disdain and disgust for their consumption. Insects offer a significant opportunity to merge traditional knowledge and modern science to improve human food security worldwide. This publication describes the contribution of insects to food security and examines future prospects for raising insects at a commercial scale to improve food and feed production, diversify diets, and support livelihoods in both developing and developed countries. Edible insects are a promising alternative to the conventional production of meat, either for direct human consumption or for indirect use as feedstock. This publication will boost awareness of the many valuable roles that insects play in sustaining nature and human life, and it will stimulate debate on the expansion of the use of insects as food and feed.

A People s Curriculum for the Earth

Author: Bill Bigelow
Publisher: Rethinking Schools
ISBN: 9780942961577
Release Date: 2014-11-14
Genre: Education

A People’s Curriculum for the Earth is a collection of articles, role plays, simulations, stories, poems, and graphics to help breathe life into teaching about the environmental crisis. The book features some of the best articles from Rethinking Schools magazine alongside classroom-friendly readings on climate change, energy, water, food, and pollution—as well as on people who are working to make things better. A People’s Curriculum for the Earth has the breadth and depth ofRethinking Globalization: Teaching for Justice in an Unjust World, one of the most popular books we’ve published. At a time when it’s becoming increasingly obvious that life on Earth is at risk, here is a resource that helps students see what’s wrong and imagine solutions. Praise for A People's Curriculum for the Earth "To really confront the climate crisis, we need to think differently, build differently, and teach differently. A People’s Curriculum for the Earth is an educator’s toolkit for our times." — Naomi Klein, author of The Shock Doctrine and This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate "This volume is a marvelous example of justice in ALL facets of our lives—civil, social, educational, economic, and yes, environmental. Bravo to the Rethinking Schools team for pulling this collection together and making us think more holistically about what we mean when we talk about justice." — Gloria Ladson-Billings, Kellner Family Chair in Urban Education, University of Wisconsin-Madison "Bigelow and Swinehart have created a critical resource for today’s young people about humanity’s responsibility for the Earth. This book can engender the shift in perspective so needed at this point on the clock of the universe." — Gregory Smith, Professor of Education, Lewis & Clark College, co-author with David Sobel of Place- and Community-based Education in Schools

River Basin Trajectories

Author: François Molle
Publisher: IWMI
ISBN: 9781845935382
Release Date: 2009
Genre: Science

Mainstream views of water resource development focus on conventional concepts of supply and demand and often conceive of river basin development as a linear and rational process of harnessing nature and developing water for human use. However, human-environment interactions are more complex and the way societies respond to water challenges is shaped by a number of cultural, environmental, economic and political factors. Using river basin case studies in a variety of contexts, this book provides an overview of how societies have gradually developed their water resources and furthers our understanding of how such resources can be managed successfully or unsuccessfully. Discussing how and why particular options are selected, and why a particular course of events eventually prevails, the book stresses the importance of context and a multidisciplinary approach in moving towards sustainable and equitable development.