Unclean Lips

Author: Josh Lambert
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9781479876433
Release Date: 2013-11-25
Genre: History

Winner of the 2014 Jordan Schnitzer Book Award presented by the Association for Jewish Studies Jews have played an integral role in the history of obscenity in America. For most of the 20th century, Jewish entrepreneurs and editors led the charge against obscenity laws. Jewish lawyers battled literary censorship even when their non-Jewish counterparts refused to do so, and they won court decisions in favor of texts including Ulysses, A Howl, Lady Chatterley’s Lover, and Tropic of Cancer. Jewish literary critics have provided some of the most influential courtroom testimony on behalf of freedom of expression. The anti-Semitic stereotype of the lascivious Jew has made many historians hesitant to draw a direct link between Jewishness and obscenity. In Unclean Lips, Josh Lambert addresses the Jewishness of participants in obscenity controversies in the U.S. directly, exploring the transformative roles played by a host of neglected figures in the development of modern and postmodern American culture. The diversity of American Jewry means that there is no single explanation for Jews' interventions in this field. Rejecting generalizations, this bookoffers case studies that pair cultural histories with close readings of both contested texts and trial transcripts to reveal the ways in which specific engagements with obscenity mattered to particular American Jews at discrete historical moments. Reading American culture from Theodore Dreiser and Henry Miller to Curb Your Enthusiasm and FCC v. Fox, Unclean Lips analyzes the variable historical and cultural factors that account for the central role Jews have played in the struggles over obscenity and censorship in the modern United States.

Hollywood s Spies

Author: Laura B. Rosenzweig
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9781479855179
Release Date: 2017-09-19
Genre: History

Tells the remarkable story of the Jewish moguls in Hollywood who established the first anti-Nazi Jewish resistance organization in the country in the 1930s In April 1939, Warner Brothers studios released the first Hollywood film to confront the Nazi threat in the United States. Confessions of a Nazi Spy, starring Edward G. Robinson, told the story of German agents in New York City working to overthrow the U.S. government. The film alerted Americans to the dangers of Nazism at home and encouraged them to defend against it. Confessions of a Nazi Spy may have been the first cinematic shot fired by Hollywood against Nazis in America, but it by no means marked the political awakening of the film industry’s Jewish executives to the problem. Hollywood’s Spies tells the remarkable story of the Jewish moguls in Hollywood who paid private investigators to infiltrate Nazi groups operating in Los Angeles, establishing the first anti-Nazi Jewish resistance organization in the country—the Los Angeles Jewish Community Committee (LAJCC). Drawing on more than 15,000 pages of archival documents, Laura B. Rosenzweig offers a compelling narrative illuminating the role that Jewish Americans played in combating insurgent Nazism in the United States in the 1930s. Forced undercover by the anti-Semitic climate of the decade, the LAJCC partnered with organizations whose Americanism was unimpeachable, such as the American Legion, to channel information regarding seditious Nazi plots to Congress, the Justice Department, the FBI and the Los Angeles Police Department. Hollywood’s Spies corrects the decades-long belief that American Jews lacked the political organization and leadership to assert their political interests during this period in our history and reveals that the LAJCC was one of many covert "fact finding" operations funded by Jewish Americans designed to root out Nazism in the United States.

Cotton Capitalists

Author: Michael R. Cohen
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9781479879700
Release Date: 2017-12-26
Genre: Business & Economics

A vivid history of the American Jewish merchants who concentrated in the nation’s most important economic sector In the nineteenth century, Jewish merchants created a thriving niche economy in the United States’ most important industry—cotton—positioning themselves at the forefront of expansion during the Reconstruction Era. Jewish success in the cotton industry was transformative for both Jewish communities and their development, and for the broader economic restructuring of the South. Cotton Capitalists analyzes this niche economy and reveals its origins. Michael R. Cohen argues that Jewish merchants’ status as a minority fueled their success by fostering ethnic networks of trust. Trust in the nineteenth century was the cornerstone of economic transactions, and this trust was largely fostered by ethnicity. Much as money flowed along ethnic lines between Anglo-American banks, Jewish merchants in the Gulf South used their own ethnic ties with other Jewish-owned firms in New York, as well as Jewish investors across the globe, to capitalize their businesses. They relied on these family connections to direct Northern credit and goods to the war-torn South, avoiding the constraints of the anti-Jewish prejudices which had previously denied them access to credit, allowing them to survive economic downturns. These American Jewish merchants reveal that ethnicity matters in the development of global capitalism. Ethnic minorities are and have frequently been at the forefront of entrepreneurship, finding innovative ways to expand narrow sectors of the economy. While this was certainly the case for Jews, it has also been true for other immigrant groups more broadly. The story of Jews in the American cotton trade is far more than the story of American Jewish success and integration—it is the story of the role of ethnicity in the development of global capitalism.

Jewish Radical Feminism

Author: Joyce Antler
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9780814707630
Release Date: 2018-05-04
Genre: History

Ready to turn the world upside down: the "Gang of four," feminist pioneers in Chicago -- Feminist sexual liberationists, rootless cosmopolitan Jews: the New York City movement -- Conscious radicals: the Jewish story of Boston's Bread and Roses -- Our bodies and our Jewish selves: the Boston Women's Health Book Collective -- We are well educated Jewishly . . . and we are going to press you?: Jewish feminists challenge religious patriarchy -- Jewish women have their noses shortened?: Secular feminists fight assimilation -- For God's sake, comb your hair! You look like a Vilde chaye?: Jewish feminist lesbians explore the politics of identity -- Rise above the world's nasty squabbles: international dimensions of Jewish feminism

Gentile New York

Author: Gil Ribak
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 9780813552194
Release Date: 2012-01-19
Genre: Social Science

The very question of “what do Jews think about the goyim” has fascinated Jews and Gentiles, anti-Semites and philo-Semites alike. Much has been written about immigrant Jews in nineteenth- and twentieth-century New York City, but Gil Ribak’s critical look at the origins of Jewish liberalism in America provides a more complicated and nuanced picture of the Americanization process. Gentile New York examines these newcomers’ evolving feelings toward non-Jews through four critical decades in the American Jewish experience. Ribak considers how they perceived Gentiles in general as well as such different groups as “Yankees” (a common term for WASPs in many Yiddish sources), Germans, Irish, Italians, Poles, and African Americans. As they discovered the complexity of America’s racial relations, the immigrants found themselves at odds with “white” American values or behavior and were drawn instead into cooperative relationships with other minorities. Sparked with many previously unknown anecdotes, quotations, and events, Ribak’s research relies on an impressive number of memoirs, autobiographies, novels, newspapers, and journals culled from both sides of the Atlantic.

Jews and Booze

Author: Marni Davis
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9781479882441
Release Date: 2014-01-01
Genre: History

From kosher wine to their ties to the liquor trade in Europe, Jews have a longstanding historical relationship with alcohol. But once prohibition hit America, American Jews were forced to choose between abandoning their historical connection to alcohol and remaining outside the American mainstream. In Jews and Booze, Marni Davis examines American Jews’ long and complicated relationship to alcohol during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the years of the national prohibition movement’s rise and fall. Bringing to bear an extensive range of archival materials, Davis offers a novel perspective on a previously unstudied area of American Jewish economic activity—the making and selling of liquor, wine, and beer—and reveals that alcohol commerce played a crucial role in Jewish immigrant acculturation and the growth of Jewish communities in the United States. But prohibition’s triumph cast a pall on American Jews’ history in the alcohol trade, forcing them to revise, clarify, and defend their communal and civic identities, both to their fellow Americans and to themselves.

Inventing the Jew

Author: Andrei Oisteanu
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803224612
Release Date: 2009-05
Genre: Social Science

Inventing the Jew follows the evolution of stereotypes of Jews from the level of traditional Romanian and other Central-East European cultures (their legends, fairy tales, ballads, carols, anecdotes, superstitions, and iconographic representations) to that of "high" cultures (including literature, essays, journalism, and sociopolitical writings), showing how motifs specific to "folkloric antisemitism" migrated to "intellectual antisemitism." This comparative perspective also highlights how the images of Jews have differed from that of other "strangers" such as Hungarians, Germans, Roma, Turks.

The Invention of International Crime

Author: P. Knepper
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9780230251120
Release Date: 2009-10-29
Genre: History

We live in the age of international crime but when did it begin? This book examines the period when crime became an international issue (1881-1914), exploring issues such as 'world-shrinking' changes in transportation, communication and commerce, and concerns about alien criminality, white slave trading and anarchist outrages.

Violence as Worship

Author: Hans Gerhard Kippenberg
Publisher:
ISBN: 0804768722
Release Date: 2011
Genre: Religion

The book views religious violence as a special type of social action and analyzes the world views and scripts of modern militant religious communities as well as those of their opponents.

Sexed Pistols

Author: Vanessa Farr
Publisher:
ISBN: STANFORD:36105133185475
Release Date: 2009
Genre: Social Science

Due to widespread availability, mobility and ease of use prolific small arms and light weapons (SALW) have become central to maintaining social dislocation, destabilization, insecurity and crime in the build-up to war, in wartime and in the aftermath of violent conflict. The book draws on experience and research from around the world on the nexus of gender, age, violence and small arms in developing and developed countries. The findings feed into a number of recommendations for future policy formulation, programme implementation and research designed to further illuminate and counteract the firing of the sexed pistol.

Shtetl

Author: Jeffrey Shandler
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 9780813562742
Release Date: 2014-01-15
Genre: Social Science

In Yiddish, shtetl simply means “town.” How does such an unassuming word come to loom so large in modern Jewish culture, with a proliferation of uses and connotations? By examining the meaning of shtetl, Jeffrey Shandler asks how Jewish life in provincial towns in Eastern Europe has become the subject of extensive creativity, memory, and scholarship from the early modern era in European history to the present. In the post-Holocaust era, the shtetl looms large in public culture as the epitome of a bygone traditional Jewish communal life. People now encounter the Jewish history of these towns through an array of cultural practices, including fiction, documentary photography, film, memoirs, art, heritage tourism, and political activism. At the same time, the shtetl attracts growing scholarly interest, as historians, social scientists, literary critics, and others seek to understand both the complex reality of life in provincial towns and the nature of its wide-ranging remembrance. Shtetl: A Vernacular Intellectual History traces the trajectory of writing about these towns—by Jews and non-Jews, residents and visitors, researchers, novelists, memoirists, journalists and others—to demonstrate how the Yiddish word for “town” emerged as a key word in Jewish culture and studies. Shandler proposes that the intellectual history of the shtetl is best approached as an exemplar of engaging Jewish vernacularity, and that the variable nature of this engagement, far from being a drawback, is central to the subject’s enduring interest.

Crackpot

Author: Adele Wiseman
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 080329753X
Release Date: 1993
Genre: Fiction

Hoda is a prostitute, but that is not the most important fact about her. Earthy, bawdy, vulnerable, and big-hearted, she is the daughter of an impoverished Jewish couple who emigrated from Russia to Canada to escape persecution. Growing up in a ghetto of Winnipeg, she experiences cruelty and bigotry early and fights back with humor and anger, which is something to behold as her young body takes on gargantuan proportions. In the neighborhood, she is considered a crackpot and worse. In truth, she is a cracked pot, a flawed human being, but her quest for love, which brings hope out of humiliation, is one of the most memorable in modern fiction. Crackpot, set in the period between two world wars, is Adele Wiseman's comic vision, for all its darkness. Somewhat satirically, the novel touches on puritanical hypocrisy and the inhumanity of institutions, notably the schools and the welfare system. Hoda, caught in a web of relationships beginning with her blind father and humpbacked mother, is its great heartbeat. Adele Wiseman won the Canadian Governor General's Award for her first novel, The Sacrifice.

Is the Holocaust Unique Large Print 16pt

Author: Alan S. Rosenbaum
Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com
ISBN: 9781458777997
Release Date: 2010-06-01
Genre: History

In essays written specifically for this volume, distinguished contributors assess highly charged and fundamental questions about the Holocaust: Is it unique? How can it be compared with other instances of genocide? What constitutes genocide, and how should the international community respond? On one side of the dispute are those who fear that if the Holocaust is seen as the worst case of genocide ever, its character will diminish the sufferings of other persecuted groups. On the other side are those who argue that unless the Holocaust's uniqueness is established, the inevitable tendency will be to diminish its abiding significance. The editor's introductions provide the contextual considerations for understanding this multidimensional dispute and suggest that there are universal lessons to be learned from studying the Holocaust. The third edition brings this volume up to date and includes new readings on the Cambodian and Rwandan genocides, common themes in genocide ideologies, and Iran's reaction to the Holocaust. In a world where genocide persists and the global community continues to struggle with the implications of international crime, prosecution, justice, atonement, reparation, and healing, the issues addressed in this book are as relevant as ever.

God Torah and the Meaning of Life

Author: Rabbi Barry Leff
Publisher:
ISBN: 9657508010
Release Date: 2010-01
Genre: Religion

People have probably been asking "What's the meaning of life?" since they could first think in terms of language to form the question. Plato said the meaning of life is to attain the highest form of knowledge, the Idea of the Good. The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy says the answer is 42. God, Torah, and the Meaning of Life is but the latest attempt to answer that most challenging of questions. It strives not so much to answer the question for you, as to give you more questions to think about, and places to go looking for answers. As Rabbi Leff writes in "God, Torah, and the Meaning of Life," "Ultimately, each person has to find his/her own way to God, and there are many paths to God. No one person, no one religion has all the answers for all the people." But many books provide some answers for some people. We hope that you will find some answers -- and perhaps some new questions as well -- within these pages.

Pre Incident Indicators of Terrorist Incidents

Author: Brent L. Smith
Publisher: DIANE Publishing
ISBN: 9781437930610
Release Date: 2011-01
Genre:

This is a print on demand edition of a hard to find publication. Explores whether sufficient data exists to examine the temporal and spatial relationships that existed in terrorist group planning, and if so, could patterns of preparatory conduct be identified? About one-half of the terrorists resided, planned, and prepared for terrorism relatively close to their eventual target. The terrorist groups existed for 1,205 days from the first planning meeting to the date of the actual/planned terrorist incident. The planning process for specific acts began 2-3 months prior to the terrorist incident. This study examined selected terrorist groups/incidents in the U.S. from 1980-2002. It provides for the potential to identify patterns of conduct that might lead to intervention prior to the commission of the actual terrorist incidents. Illustrations.