The Evolution of the Polynesian Chiefdoms

Author: Patrick Vinton Kirch
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521273161
Release Date: 1989-07-13
Genre: History

A first study from an archaeological perspective of the elaborate systems of Polynesian chiefdoms presents an original account of the processes of cultural change and evolution over three millennia.

Legacy of the Landscape

Author: Patrick Vinton Kirch
Publisher: University of Hawaii Press
ISBN: 0824817397
Release Date: 1996-01
Genre: Social Science

"Some 1,500 years ago, Polynesian seafarers discovered and settled the Hawaiian Islands, spawning a culture that flourished in isolation until Europeans arrived in the late eighteenth century. Pre-contact Hawaiian civilization is represented by a rich legacy of archaeological sites, many of which have been preserved and are accessible to the public. This volume provides for the first time an authoritative handbook to the most important of those archaeological treasures." "The fifty sites covered in this book are distributed over all of the main islands and include heiau (temples), habitation sites, irrigated and dryland agricultural complexes, fishponds, petroglyphs, and several post-contact (early nineteenth-century) sites. Site locations are shown on individual island maps, and detailed plans are provided for several sites."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Anahulu

Author: Patrick Vinton Kirch
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226733653
Release Date: 1994-07-01
Genre: History

From the late 1700s, Hawaiian society began to change rapidly as it responded to the growing world system of capital whose trade routes and markets crisscrossed the islands. Reflecting many years of collaboration between Marshall Sahlins, a prominent social anthropologist, and Patrick V. Kirch, a leading archaeologist of Oceania, Anahulu seeks out the traces of this transformation in a typical local center of the kingdom founded by Kamehameha: the Anahulu river valley of northwestern Oahu. Volume I shows the surprising effects of the encounter with the imperial forces of commerce and Christianity—the distinctive ways the Hawaiian people culturally organized the experience, from the structure of the kingdom to the daily life of ordinary people. Volume II examines the material record of changes in local social organization, economy and production, population, and domestic settlement arrangements.

How Chiefs Became Kings

Author: Patrick Vinton Kirch
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520947849
Release Date: 2010-12-02
Genre: Social Science

In How Chiefs Became Kings, Patrick Vinton Kirch addresses a central problem in anthropological archaeology: the emergence of "archaic states" whose distinctive feature was divine kingship. Kirch takes as his focus the Hawaiian archipelago, commonly regarded as the archetype of a complex chiefdom. Integrating anthropology, linguistics, archaeology, traditional history, and theory, and drawing on significant contributions from his own four decades of research, Kirch argues that Hawaiian polities had become states before the time of Captain Cook’s voyage (1778-1779). The status of most archaic states is inferred from the archaeological record. But Kirch shows that because Hawai`i’s kingdoms were established relatively recently, they could be observed and recorded by Cook and other European voyagers. Substantive and provocative, this book makes a major contribution to the literature of precontact Hawai`i and illuminates Hawai`i’s importance in the global theory and literature about divine kingship, archaic states, and sociopolitical evolution.

On the Road of the Winds

Author: Patrick Vinton Kirch
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520292819
Release Date: 2017-11-14
Genre: Social Science

The Pacific Ocean covers one-third of the earth's surface and encompasses many thousands of islands, which are home to numerous human societies and cultures. Among these indigenous Oceanic cultures are the intrepid Polynesian double-hulled canoe navigators, the atoll dwellers of Micronesia, the statue carvers of remote Easter Island, and the famed traders of Melanesia. Decades of archaeological excavations, combined with allied research in historical linguistics, biological anthropology, and comparative ethnography, have revealed much new information about the long-term history of these Pacific Island societies and cultures. On the Road of the Winds synthesizes the grand sweep of human history in the Pacific Islands, beginning with the movement of early people out from Asia more than 40,000 years ago, and tracing the development of myriad indigenous cultures up to the time of European contact in the sixteenth to eighteenth centuries. This updated edition, enhanced with many new illustrations and an extensive bibliography, synthesizes the latest archaeological, linguistic, and biological discoveries that reveal the vastness of ancient history in the Pacific Islands.

Yutopian

Author: Joan M. Gero
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 9780292772021
Release Date: 2015-11-18
Genre: Social Science

Around 400 BCE, inhabitants of the Southern Andes took up a sedentary lifestyle that included the practice of agriculture. Settlements were generally solitary or clustered structures with walled agricultural fields and animal corrals, and the first small villages appeared in some regions. Surprisingly, people were also producing and circulating exotic goods: polychrome ceramics, copper and gold ornaments, bronze bracelets and bells. To investigate the apparent contradiction between a lack of social complexity and the broad circulation of elaborated goods, archaeologist Joan Gero co-directed a binational project to excavate the site of Yutopian, an unusually well-preserved Early Formative village in the mountains of Northwest Argentina. In Yutopian, Gero describes how archaeologists from the United States and Argentina worked with local residents to uncover the lifeways of the earliest sedentary people of the region. Gero foregounds many experiential aspects of archaeological fieldwork that are usually omitted in the archaeological literature: the tedious labor and constraints of time and personnel, the emotional landscape, the intimate ethnographic settings and Andean people, the socio-politics, the difficult decisions and, especially, the role that ambiguity plays in determining archaeological meanings. Gero's unique approach offers a new model for the site report as she masterfully demonstrates how the decisions made in conducting any scientific undertaking play a fundamental role in shaping the knowledge produced in that project.

Memorializing Pearl Harbor

Author: Geoffrey M. White
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822374435
Release Date: 2016-04-29
Genre: Social Science

Memorializing Pearl Harbor examines the challenge of representing history at the site of the attack that brought America into World War II. Analyzing moments in which history is re-presented—in commemorative events, documentary films, museum design, and educational programming—Geoffrey M. White shows that the memorial to the Pearl Harbor bombing is not a fixed or singular institution. Rather, it has become a site in which many histories are performed, validated, and challenged. In addition to valorizing military service and sacrifice, the memorial has become a place where Japanese veterans have come to seek recognition and reconciliation, where Japanese Americans have sought to correct narratives of racial mistrust, and where Native Hawaiians have challenged their ongoing erasure from their own land. Drawing on extended ethnographic fieldwork, White maps these struggles onto larger controversies about public history, museum practices, and national memory.

First Settlement of Remote Oceania

Author: Mike T. Carson
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9783319010472
Release Date: 2013-07-13
Genre: Social Science

This book offers the only synthesis of early-period Marianas archaeology, marking the first human settlement of Remote Oceania about 1500 B.C. In these remote islands of the northwest Pacific Ocean, archaeological discoveries now can define the oldest site contexts, dating, and artifacts of a Neolithic (late stone-age) people. This ancient settlement was accomplished by the world’s longest open-ocean voyage in human history at its time, more than 2000 km from any contemporary populated area. This work brings the isolated Mariana Islands into the forefront of scientific research of how people first settled Remote Oceania, further important for understanding long-distance human migration in general. Given this significance, the early Marianas sites deserve close attention that has been awkwardly missing until now. The author draws on his years of intensive field research to define the earliest Marianas sites in scientific detail but accessible for broad readership. It covers three major topics: 1) situating the ancient sites in their original environmental contexts; 2) inventory of the early-period sites and their dating; and 3) the full range of pottery, stone tools, shell ornaments, and other artifacts. The work concludes with discussing the impacts of the findings on Asia-Pacific archaeology and on human global migration studies.

Discovering the Mysteries of Ancient America

Author: Frank Joseph
Publisher: Red Wheel/Weiser
ISBN: 9781564148421
Release Date: 2006-01-01
Genre: History

In Discovering the Mysteries of Ancient America, the author of The Atlantis Encyclopedia turns his sextant towards this hemisphere. Here is a collection of the most controversial articles selected from seventy issues of the infamous Ancient American magazine. They range from the discovery of Roman relics in Arizona and California's Chinese treasure, to Viking rune-stones in Minnesota and Oklahoma and the mysterious religions of ancient Americans.

A World History of Nineteenth Century Archaeology

Author: Margarita Díaz-Andreu García
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199217175
Release Date: 2007-11-22
Genre: Science

Margarita Diaz-Andreu offers an innovative history of archaeology during the nineteenth century, encompassing all its fields from the origins of humanity to the medieval period, and all areas of the world. The development of archaeology is placed within the framework of contemporary political events, with a particular focus upon the ideologies of nationalism and imperialism. Diaz-Andreu examines a wide range of issues, including the creation of institutions, the conversion of thestudy of antiquities into a profession, public memory, changes in archaeological thought and practice, and the effect on archaeology of racism, religion, the belief in progress, hegemony, and resistance.

Feathered Gods and Fishhooks

Author: Patrick Vinton Kirch
Publisher: University of Hawaii Press
ISBN: 0824819381
Release Date: 1997-01-01
Genre: History

"Archaeology has assumed the role of combining all the evidence on Polynesian prehistory into a coherent pattern. Patrick Kirch has done this for Hawaii with distinction. His book is clearly written, carefully organized, abundantly illustrated, and handsomely produced volume.... A timely and much needed contribution." --Hawaiian Journal of History "With the publishing of this well-written, profusely illustrated book, Kirch has made a valuable contribution to Hawaiian and Pacific archaeological studies.... A necessary book for all Pacific scholars." --Journal of Polynesian Studies

A Shark Going Inland Is My Chief

Author: Patrick Vinton Kirch
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520953833
Release Date: 2012-08-06
Genre: Social Science

Tracing the origins of the Hawaiians and other Polynesians back to the shores of the South China Sea, archaeologist Patrick Vinton Kirch follows their voyages of discovery across the Pacific in this fascinating history of Hawaiian culture from about one thousand years ago. Combining more than four decades of his own research with Native Hawaiian oral traditions and the evidence of archaeology, Kirch puts a human face on the gradual rise to power of the Hawaiian god-kings, who by the late eighteenth century were locked in a series of wars for ultimate control of the entire archipelago. This lively, accessible chronicle works back from Captain James Cook’s encounter with the pristine kingdom in 1778, when the British explorers encountered an island civilization governed by rulers who could not be gazed upon by common people. Interweaving anecdotes from his own widespread travel and extensive archaeological investigations into the broader historical narrative, Kirch shows how the early Polynesian settlers of Hawai'i adapted to this new island landscape and created highly productive agricultural systems.

The Wet and the Dry

Author: Patrick Vinton Kirch
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226437493
Release Date: 1995-01-01
Genre: Social Science

Scholars and researchers have long believed that the ability to irrigate is crucial to the development of civilizations. In this book, archaeologist Patrick Kirch challenges this "hydraulic hypothesis" and provides a more accurate and detailed account of the role of "wet" and "dry" cultivation systems in the development of complex sociopolitical structures. Examining research on cultural adaptation and ecology in Western Polynesia and utilizing extensive data from a variety of important South Pacific sites, Kirch not only reveals how particular systems of production developed within the constraints imposed by environmental conditions, but also explores the tension that arises between contrasting productive systems with differential abilities to produce surplus. He shows that the near total neglect of short-fallow dryland cultivation, as well as arboriculture, or tree-cropping, has seriously distorted the picture that archaeologists and anthropologists have of agricultural intensification and its relation to complex social structure. This work, likely to become a classic, will be central to all future discussions of the ecology and politics of agricultural intensification.

Origins and Revolutions

Author: Clive Gamble
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781139462495
Release Date: 2007-03-26
Genre: Social Science

In this study Clive Gamble presents and questions two of the most famous descriptions of change in prehistory. The first is the 'human revolution', when evidence for art, music, religion and language first appears. The second is the economic and social revolution of the Neolithic period. Gamble identifies the historical agendas behind 'origins research' and presents a bold alternative to these established frameworks, relating the study of change to the material basis of human identity. He examines, through artefact proxies, how changing identities can be understood using embodied material metaphors and in two major case-studies charts the prehistory of innovations, asking, did agriculture really change the social world? This is an important and challenging book that will be essential reading for every student and scholar of prehistory.