Food Insecurity Vulnerability and Human Rights Failure

Author: Basudeb Guha-Khasnobis
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9780230589506
Release Date: 2007-10-11
Genre: Business & Economics

This volume discusses the significance of human rights approaches to food and the way it relates to gender considerations, addressing links between hunger and the HIV/AIDS pandemic, agricultural productivity and the environment.

Protecting Vulnerable Groups

Author: Francesca Ippolito
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 9781782256144
Release Date: 2015-04-30
Genre: Law

The concept of vulnerability has not been unequivocally interpreted either in regional or in universal international legal instruments. This book analyses the work of the EU and the Council of Europe in ascertaining a clear framework or a set of criteria suitable to determine those who should be considered vulnerable and disadvantaged. It also explores the measures required to protect their human rights. Key questions can be answered by analysing the different methods used to determine the levels of protection offered by the two European systems. These questions include whether the Convention and the case law of the Strasbourg Court, the monitoring mechanisms of the Council of Europe, EU law and the case law of the European Court of Justice enhance the protection of vulnerable groups and expand the protection of their rights, or, alternatively, whether they are mainly used to fill in relatively minor gaps or occasional lapses in national rights guarantees. The analysis also shows the extent to which these two European systems provide analogous, or indeed divergent, standards and how any such divergence might be problematic in light of the EU accession to the European Convention on Human Rights.

Vulnerability

Author: Martha Albertson Fineman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781317000907
Release Date: 2016-02-11
Genre: Law

Martha Albertson Fineman’s earlier work developed a theory of inevitable and derivative dependencies as a way of problematizing the core assumptions underlying the ’autonomous’ subject of liberal law and politics in the context of US equality discourse. Her ’vulnerability thesis’ represents the evolution of that earlier work and situates human vulnerability as a critical heuristic for exploring alternative legal and political foundations. This book draws together major British and American scholars who present different perspectives on the concept of vulnerability and Fineman's ’vulnerability thesis’. The contributors include scholars who have thought about vulnerability in different ways and contexts prior to encountering Fineman’s work, as well as those for whom Fineman’s work provided an introduction to thinking through a vulnerability lens. This collection demonstrates the broad and intellectually exciting potential of vulnerability as a theoretical foundation for legal and political engagements with a range of urgent contemporary challenges. Exploring ways in which vulnerability might provide a new ethical foundation for law and politics, the book will be of interest to the general reader, as well as academics and students in fields such as jurisprudence, philosophy, legal theory, political theory, feminist theory, and ethics.

Sexuality Social Exclusion Human Rights

Author: Christine Barrow
Publisher:
ISBN: 9766373957
Release Date: 2009-01-01
Genre: Health & Fitness

Understanding and responding to the epidemic of HIV in the Caribbean context requires a multidimensional approach. Drawing together and impressive array of academics, activist scholars, educations specialists and frontline service providers, Sexuality, Social Exclusion and Human Rights examines some of the key drivers of HIV and AIDS by exploring risk, vulnerability, power, culture, sexuality and gender. The primary challenge is first to recognise and come to grips with the circumstances in which HIV is transmitted in order to construct the policies and practices in response. Divided into four sections: Human Rights, Citizenship and Social Exclusion; Rethinking Communication; Reconceptualizing Sex; and Policy and Macro-Perspectives, the contributors to this volume raise controversial issues not formally discussed in the Caribbean context but which require confrontation to arrest the spread of HIV. This volume provides a unique perspective and analysis of the Caribbean response and how the inclusion of many different sectors in society and an interdisciplinary, rather than segregated multidisciplinary approach, can effectively address the spread of HIV and AIDS in the region.

Food Insecurity Vulnerability and Human Rights Failure

Author: Basudeb Guha-Khasnobis
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9780230589506
Release Date: 2007-10-11
Genre: Business & Economics

This volume discusses the significance of human rights approaches to food and the way it relates to gender considerations, addressing links between hunger and the HIV/AIDS pandemic, agricultural productivity and the environment.

Human Rights and Climate Change

Author: Stephen Humphreys
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521762762
Release Date: 2010
Genre: Law

This inquiry into the human rights dimensions of climate change identifies future perspectives, concerns and dilemmas for law and policy.

Climate Justice

Author: Henry Shue
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780198713708
Release Date: 2014
Genre: Political Science

Climate change is the most difficult threat facing humanity in the 21st century, and negotiations to reach international agreement on how to control climate change have so far foundered on deep issues of justice. Henry Shue, a practical philosopher who has been analysing the moral and political issues confronting all attempts at multilateral cooperation in tackling climate change as they have evolved over the last twenty years since negotiations began, offershere seventeen careful, lucid and highly accessible essays on the central questions. Policy-makers as well as students of moral philosophy and political theory will find provocative and imaginativeproposed answers to key questions of justice that are based in moral reasons informed by political insight and scientific understanding and that offer a way forward.

Vulnerability in Resistance

Author: Judith Butler
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822373490
Release Date: 2016-10-07
Genre: Social Science

Vulnerability and resistance have often been seen as opposites, with the assumption that vulnerability requires protection and the strengthening of paternalistic power at the expense of collective resistance. Focusing on political movements and cultural practices in different global locations, including Turkey, Palestine, France, and the former Yugoslavia, the contributors to Vulnerability in Resistance articulate an understanding of the role of vulnerability in practices of resistance. They consider how vulnerability is constructed, invoked, and mobilized within neoliberal discourse, the politics of war, resistance to authoritarian and securitarian power, in LGBTQI struggles, and in the resistance to occupation and colonial violence. The essays offer a feminist account of political agency by exploring occupy movements and street politics, informal groups at checkpoints and barricades, practices of self-defense, hunger strikes, transgressive enactments of solidarity and mourning, infrastructural mobilizations, and aesthetic and erotic interventions into public space that mobilize memory and expose forms of power. Pointing to possible strategies for a feminist politics of transversal engagements and suggesting a politics of bodily resistance that does not disavow forms of vulnerability, the contributors develop a new conception of embodiment and sociality within fields of contemporary power. Contributors. Meltem Ahiska, Athena Athanasiou, Sarah Bracke, Judith Butler, Elsa Dorlin, Başak Ertür, Zeynep Gambetti, Rema Hammami, Marianne Hirsch, Elena Loizidou, Leticia Sabsay, Nükhet Sirman, Elena Tzelepis

Humanitarianism and Modern Culture

Author: Keith Tester
Publisher: Penn State Press
ISBN: 9780271037356
Release Date: 2010
Genre: Political Science

"An examination of humanitarianism in Western society. Argues that humanitarianism has become a staple part of modern media and celebrity culture."--Provided by publisher.

The Endtimes of Human Rights

Author: Stephen Hopgood
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801469305
Release Date: 2013-10-04
Genre: Political Science

"We are living through the endtimes of the civilizing mission. The ineffectual International Criminal Court and its disastrous first prosecutor, Luis Moreno-Ocampo, along with the failure in Syria of the Responsibility to Protect are the latest pieces of evidence not of transient misfortunes but of fatal structural defects in international humanism. Whether it is the increase in deadly attacks on aid workers, the torture and 'disappearing' of al-Qaeda suspects by American officials, the flouting of international law by states such as Sri Lanka and Sudan, or the shambles of the Khmer Rouge tribunal in Phnom Penh, the prospect of one world under secular human rights law is receding. What seemed like a dawn is in fact a sunset. The foundations of universal liberal norms and global governance are crumbling."—from The Endtimes of Human Rights In a book that is at once passionate and provocative, Stephen Hopgood argues, against the conventional wisdom, that the idea of universal human rights has become not only ill adapted to current realities but also overambitious and unresponsive. A shift in the global balance of power away from the United States further undermines the foundations on which the global human rights regime is based. American decline exposes the contradictions, hypocrisies and weaknesses behind the attempt to enforce this regime around the world and opens the way for resurgent religious and sovereign actors to challenge human rights. Historically, Hopgood writes, universal humanist norms inspired a sense of secular religiosity among the new middle classes of a rapidly modernizing Europe. Human rights were the product of a particular worldview (Western European and Christian) and specific historical moments (humanitarianism in the nineteenth century, the aftermath of the Holocaust). They were an antidote to a troubling contradiction—the coexistence of a belief in progress with horrifying violence and growing inequality. The obsolescence of that founding purpose in the modern globalized world has, Hopgood asserts, transformed the institutions created to perform it, such as the International Committee of the Red Cross and recently the International Criminal Court, into self-perpetuating structures of intermittent power and authority that mask their lack of democratic legitimacy and systematic ineffectiveness. At their best, they provide relief in extraordinary situations of great distress; otherwise they are serving up a mixture of false hope and unaccountability sustained by “human rights” as a global brand. The Endtimes of Human Rights is sure to be controversial. Hopgood makes a plea for a new understanding of where hope lies for human rights, a plea that mourns the promise but rejects the reality of universalism in favor of a less predictable encounter with the diverse realities of today’s multipolar world.

Not Enough

Author: Samuel Moyn
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674984820
Release Date: 2018-04-10
Genre: Political Science

The age of human rights has been kindest to the rich. Even as state violations of political rights garnered unprecedented attention due to human rights campaigns, a commitment to material equality disappeared. In its place, market fundamentalism has emerged as the dominant force in national and global economies. In this provocative book, Samuel Moyn analyzes how and why we chose to make human rights our highest ideals while simultaneously neglecting the demands of a broader social and economic justice. In a pioneering history of rights stretching back to the Bible, Not Enough charts how twentieth-century welfare states, concerned about both abject poverty and soaring wealth, resolved to fulfill their citizens’ most basic needs without forgetting to contain how much the rich could tower over the rest. In the wake of two world wars and the collapse of empires, new states tried to take welfare beyond its original European and American homelands and went so far as to challenge inequality on a global scale. But their plans were foiled as a neoliberal faith in markets triumphed instead. Moyn places the career of the human rights movement in relation to this disturbing shift from the egalitarian politics of yesterday to the neoliberal globalization of today. Exploring why the rise of human rights has occurred alongside enduring and exploding inequality, and why activists came to seek remedies for indigence without challenging wealth, Not Enough calls for more ambitious ideals and movements to achieve a humane and equitable world.