War Journalism and the Shaping of the Twentieth Century

Author: Angela V. John
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 9780857717832
Release Date: 2006-03-31
Genre: History

Called "the King of Correspondents" Henry W. Nevinson (1856 - 1941) captured the political zeitgeist of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in his journalism and his commentaries on key world events. The British journalist and war correspondent covered conflicts across Europe and Africa and wrote about the United States during a time of upheaval on the brink of the modern age. He observed the Siege of Ladysmith, the 1905 revolution in Russia, wars in Greece and South Africa and the tragedy at Gallipoli, shaping the understanding of world affairs at the time. Nevinson campaigned for social justice in Central Africa and India and was the first to report sympathetically on Germany's devastation after the First World War. In the 1920s he visited Palestine and Iraq and accompanied Ramsay Macdonald on the first visit of a British Prime Minister to an American President. Although courting the establishment, Nevinson cultivated controversy as a rebel. Yet he remained a highly respected journalist whose vivid reportage of events and witty portraits of political and artistic figures of the time made him an acute observer who wrote exquisite prose._x000D_ _x000D_ Based on Nevinson’s compelling diaries covering nearly 50 years, Angela John’s powerful prose captures, for the first time, the story of this important and groundbreaking figure. Nevinson’s life sheds new light on the construction of the world order in the last century, at the same time helping us to understand more clearly the changing role of the war correspondent in a media-dominant age. His observations on the Middle East, the Balkans, the Caucasus and the United States illuminate many of the conflicts which resonate in today's uncertain world.

Race News

Author: Fred Carroll
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252050091
Release Date: 2017-11-06
Genre: Language Arts & Disciplines

Once distinct, the commercial and alternative black press began to crossover with one another in the 1920s. The porous press culture that emerged shifted the political and economic motivations shaping African American journalism. It also sparked disputes over radical politics that altered news coverage of some of the most momentous events in African American history. Starting in the 1920s, Fred Carroll traces how mainstream journalists incorporated coverage of the alternative press's supposedly marginal politics of anti-colonialism, anti-capitalism, and black separatism into their publications. He follows the narrative into the 1950s, when an alternative press re-emerged as commercial publishers curbed progressive journalism in the face of Cold War repression. Yet, as Carroll shows, journalists achieved significant editorial independence, and continued to do so as national newspapers modernized into the 1960s. Alternative writers' politics seeped into commercial papers via journalists who wrote for both presses and through professional friendships that ignored political boundaries. Compelling and incisive, Race News reports the dramatic history of how black press culture evolved in the twentieth century.

The Voice of America

Author: Mitchell Stephens
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 9781466879409
Release Date: 2017-06-20
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

The first and definitive biography of an audacious adventurer—the most famous journalist of his time—who more than anyone invented contemporary journalism. Tom Brokaw says: "Lowell Thomas so deserves this lively account of his legendary life. He was a man for all seasons." Few Americans today recognize his name, but Lowell Thomas was as well known in his time as any American journalist ever has been. Raised in a Colorado gold-rush town, Thomas covered crimes and scandals for local then Chicago newspapers. He began lecturing on Alaska, after spending eight days in Alaska. Then he assigned himself to report on World War I and returned with an exclusive: the story of “Lawrence of Arabia.” In 1930, Lowell Thomas began delivering America’s initial radio newscast. His was the trusted voice that kept Americans abreast of world events in turbulent decades – his face familiar, too, as the narrator of the most popular newsreels. His contemporaries were also dazzled by his life. In a prime-time special after Thomas died in 1981, Walter Cronkite said that Thomas had “crammed a couple of centuries worth of living” into his eighty-nine years. Thomas delighted in entering “forbidden” countries—Tibet, for example, where he met the teenaged Dalai Lama. The Explorers Club has named its building, its awards, and its annual dinner after him. Journalists in the last decades of the twentieth century—including Cronkite and Tom Brokaw—acknowledged a profound debt to Thomas. Though they may not know it, journalists today too are following a path he blazed. In The Voice of America, Mitchell Stephens offers a hugely entertaining, sometimes critical portrait of this larger than life figure.

War in 140 Characters

Author: David Patrikarakos
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 9780465096152
Release Date: 2017-11-14
Genre: Political Science

A leading foreign correspondent looks at how social media has transformed the modern battlefield, and how wars are fought Modern warfare is a war of narratives, where bullets are fired both physically and virtually. Whether you are a president or a terrorist, if you don't understand how to deploy the power of social media effectively you may win the odd battle but you will lose a twenty-first century war. Here, journalist David Patrikarakos draws on unprecedented access to key players to provide a new narrative for modern warfare. He travels thousands of miles across continents to meet a de-radicalized female member of ISIS recruited via Skype, a liberal Russian in Siberia who takes a job manufacturing "Ukrainian" news, and many others to explore the way social media has transformed the way we fight, win, and consume wars-and what this means for the world going forward.

Warren G Magnuson and the Shaping of Twentieth Century America

Author: Shelby Scates
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 9780295802213
Release Date: 2012-09-01
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

Warren G. Magnuson served as U.S. senator from the state of Washington for six terms. The sheer sweep of his accomplishments is astonishing: authoring the 1964 Civil Rights Act, protecting Puget Sound, saving Boeing for Seattle, championing consumer protection legislation, reorganizing the railroads, and godfathering the electrification of the Pacific Northwest by pressing for Columbia and Snake River dams. He pushed for federal aid to education, kept Pentagon budgets down, and established the National Institutes of Health while arguing throughout the McCarthy era against U.S. isolation from China. He was also a whiskey-and-poker companion to Presidents Roosevelt, Truman, Kennedy, and Johnson.

The Long Shadow The Legacies of the Great War in the Twentieth Century

Author: David Reynolds
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393088632
Release Date: 2014-05-12
Genre: History

A critically acclaimed historian describes the first World War in terms of its lasting impact on politics, diplomacy and economics as well as art and literature across the 20th century and not just as a precursor to World War II. 20,000 first printing.

Notes of a War Correspondent

Author: R. H. Davis
Publisher: 1st World Publishing
ISBN: 1595401156
Release Date: 2004-09-01
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

Purchase one of 1st World Library's Classic Books and help support our free internet library of downloadable eBooks. 1st World Library-Literary Society is a non-profit educational organization. Visit us online at www.1stWorldLibrary.ORG - Adolfo Rodriguez was the only son of a Cuban farmer, who lived nine miles outside of Santa Clara, beyond the hills that surround that city to the north. When the revolution in Cuba broke out young Rodriguez joined the insurgents, leaving his father and mother and two sisters at the farm. He was taken, in December of 1896, by a force of the Guardia Civile, the corps d'elite of the Spanish army, and defended himself when they tried to capture him, wounding three of them with his machete. He was tried by a military court for bearing arms against the government, and sentenced to be shot by a fusillade some morning before sunrise.

Selling the Great War

Author: Alan Axelrod
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 0230619592
Release Date: 2009-03-03
Genre: History

The riveting, untold story of George Creel and the Committee on Public Information -- the first and only propaganda initiative sanctioned by the U.S. government. When the people of the United States were reluctant to enter World War I, maverick journalist George Creel created a committee at President Woodrow Wilson's request to sway the tide of public opinion. The Committee on Public Information monopolized every medium and avenue of communication with the goal of creating a nation of enthusiastic warriors for democracy. Forging a path that would later be studied and retread by such characters as Adolf Hitler, the Committee revolutionized the techniques of governmental persuasion, changing the course of history. Selling the War is the story of George Creel and the epoch-making agency he built and led. It will tell how he came to build the and how he ran it, using the emerging industries of mass advertising and public relations to convince isolationist Americans to go to war. It was a force whose effects were felt throughout the twentieth century and continue to be felt, perhaps even more strongly, today. In this compelling and original account, Alan Axelrod offers a fascinating portrait of America on the cusp of becoming a world power and how its first and most extensive propaganda machine attained unprecedented results.

The News from Ireland

Author: Maurice Walsh
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 9781848856738
Release Date: 2011-04-15
Genre: History

The Anglo-Irish war of 1919-1921 finally broke apart the constitution of the United Kingdom, drawing a line under 120 years of turbulent history since the Act of Union. In the Republic of Ireland it is referred to as the War of Independence and celebrated as the heroic struggle which forged an independent Irish state; in Britain it is retrospectively regarded as the beginning of the end of Imperial rule. But how was the revolution perceived at the time? How was it reported in the media and with what purpose? And how did coverage vary between Britain, Ireland and the United States? The News From Ireland examines the development of the Anglo-Irish war and the shifts in the reporting of events by British and American correspondents as well as other foreign journalists and literary figures. It includes revealing insights into the propaganda war and the ways in which both sides tried to interest journalists in their cause. Maurice Walsh also emphasizes the power of public opinion to influence the British government and analyses the effect this had on the course of the revolution. The News from Ireland offers a penetrating and persuasive assessment of the Irish revolution itself and the role of the press and journalism in that phase of world history. This important book will be essential reading for anyone interested in Irish history and how our understanding of history generally is shaped by the media.

Heroes and Scoundrels

Author: Matthew C. Ehrlich
Publisher:
ISBN: 0252039025
Release Date: 2015-03-01
Genre: Language Arts & Disciplines

Whether it's the rule-defying lifer, the sharp-witted female newshound, or the irascible editor in chief, journalists in popular culture have shaped our views of the press and its role in a free society since mass culture arose over a century ago. Drawing on portrayals of journalists in television, film, radio, novels, comics, plays, and other media, Matthew C. Ehrlich and Joe Saltzman survey how popular media has depicted the profession across time. Their creative use of media artifacts provides thought-provoking forays into such fundamental issues as how pop culture mythologizes and demythologizes key events in journalism history and how it confronts issues of race, gender, and sexual orientation on the job. From Network to The Wire, from Lois Lane to Mikael Blomkvist, Heroes and Scoundrels reveals how portrayals of journalism's relationship to history, professionalism, power, image, and war influence our thinking and the very practice of democracy.

Twentieth Century Music and Politics

Author: Pauline Fairclough
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781317005797
Release Date: 2016-02-17
Genre: Music

When considering the role music played in the major totalitarian regimes of the century it is music's usefulness as propaganda that leaps first to mind. But as a number of the chapters in this volume demonstrate, there is a complex relationship both between art music and politicised mass culture, and between entertainment and propaganda. Nationality, self/other, power and ideology are the dominant themes of this book, whilst key topics include: music in totalitarian regimes; music as propaganda; music and national identity; émigré communities and composers; music's role in shaping identities of 'self' and 'other' and music as both resistance to and instrument of oppression. Taking the contributions together it becomes clear that shared experiences such as war, dictatorship, colonialism, exile and emigration produced different, yet clearly inter-related musical consequences.

Night

Author: Elie Wiesel
Publisher: Hill and Wang
ISBN: 9781466805361
Release Date: 2012-02-07
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

A New Translation From The French By Marion Wiesel Night is Elie Wiesel's masterpiece, a candid, horrific, and deeply poignant autobiographical account of his survival as a teenager in the Nazi death camps. This new translation by Marion Wiesel, Elie's wife and frequent translator, presents this seminal memoir in the language and spirit truest to the author's original intent. And in a substantive new preface, Elie reflects on the enduring importance of Night and his lifelong, passionate dedication to ensuring that the world never forgets man's capacity for inhumanity to man. Night offers much more than a litany of the daily terrors, everyday perversions, and rampant sadism at Auschwitz and Buchenwald; it also eloquently addresses many of the philosophical as well as personal questions implicit in any serious consideration of what the Holocaust was, what it meant, and what its legacy is and will be.

Mary McGrory

Author: John Norris
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9780525429715
Release Date: 2015
Genre: Women journalists

Before there was Maureen Dowd or Gail Collins or Molly Ivins, there was Mary McGrory. She was a trailblazing columnist who achieved national syndication and reported from the front lines of American politics for five decades. From her first assignment reporting on the Army - McCarthy hearings to her Pulitzer-winning coverage of Watergate and controversial observations of President Bush after September 11, McGrory humanized the players on the great national stage while establishing herself as a uniquely influential voice. Behind the scenes she flirted, drank, cajoled, and jousted with the most important figures in American life, breaking all the rules in the journalism textbook. Her writing was admired and feared by such notables as Lyndon Johnson (who also tried to seduce her) and her friend Bobby Kennedy who observed, 'Mary is so gentle - until she gets behind a typewriter.' Her soirees, filled with Supreme Court justices, senators, interns, and copy boys alike, were legendary. As the red-hot center of the Beltway in a time when the newsrooms were dominated by men, McGrory makes for a powerfully engrossing subject. Laced with juicy gossip and McGrory's own acerbic wit, John Norris's colorful biography reads like an insider's view of latter-day American history - and one of its most enduring characters. 'Mary McGrory- The First Queen of Journalismwill scratch every nostalgic itch with ink-stained fingers. McGrory's five-decade career covering Washington provides an enormous picture window onto the media landscape, and Norris . . . focuses much of his attention on the glamour of the era . . . You may find yourself beguiled by McGrory as well. I realized I was under her spell at the end of the book.' New York Times Book Review'Any person of spirit, who loves good writing, will almost feel, after reading this book, that he or she did have a chance to dance the rumba toward dawn with Mary McGrory.' Roy Blount Jr.'Mary McGrory's life as a Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington columnist is so interesting that it's hard to understand why there hasn't been a book about her until now. Enter Norris . . . with this balanced, page-turning biography . . . Ted Kennedy proclaimed McGrory 'poet laureate of American journalism,' and this nuanced portrait provides plenty of evidence.' Kirkus(starred review)'Norris portrays a talented and complex woman . . . Those interested in recent political history will relish the fascinating insider details.' Library Journal'A dame, a babe, a wit, a raconteur, McGrory was the ultimate journalist- interested, interesting, discerning, dedicated. Her curiosity and charm, intelligence and integrity were nonpareil and earned her coveted insider access to the most important events and people of the last half of the twentieth century. She laid the groundwork for generations of journalists of both genders for decades to come. Few biographies are page-turners, but Norris's vivid account of this pioneering writer so vibrantly recalls the heady heyday of op-ed journalism that readers will avidly mourn the advent of the 24/7 cable and talk radio punditry that took its place. McGrory was an icon of wit and wisdom; we will not see her like again.' Booklist(starred review)'Sensitive and engrossing . . . this book is a rich portrait, and will likely encourage readers to seek more of McGrory's groundbreaking writing.' Publishers Weekly'Norris . . . earns his reader's respect with careful attention to detail and a precarious but precise balance between his primary, individual subject and the context of U.S. and world history.Mary McGroryis a striking story, meticulously and entertainingly portrayed.' Shelf Awareness'Intimate, gossipy, and laced with delicious anec

The Magnificent Medills

Author: Megan McKinney
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 9780062097750
Release Date: 2011-10-11
Genre: History

The riveting story of the country’s first media dynasty, the Medills of Chicago, whose power and influence shaped the story of America and American journalism for four generations When thirty-two-year-old former lawyer Joseph Medill bought a controlling stake in the bankrupt Chicago Daily Tribune in 1855, he had no way of foreseeing the unparalleled influence he and his progeny would have on the world of journalism and on American society at large. Medill personally influenced the political tide that transformed America during the midnineteenth century by fostering the Republican Party, engineering the election of Abraham Lincoln and serving as a catalyst for the outbreak of the Civil War. The dynasty he established, filled with colorful characters, went on to take American journalism by storm. His grandson, Colonel Robert R. McCormick, personified Chicago, as well as its great newspaper, the Chicago Tribune, throughout much of the twentieth century. Robert’s cousin, Joseph Medill Patterson, started the New York Daily News, and Joe’s sister, Cissy Patterson, was the innovative editor of the Washington Times-Herald. In the fourth generation, Alicia Patterson founded Long Island’s Newsday, the most stunning journalistic accomplishment of post–World War II America. Printer’s ink raged in the veins of the Medills, the McCormicks and the Pattersons throughout a century, and their legacy prevailed for another five decades—always in the forefront of events, shaping the intellectual and social pulse of America. At the same time, the dark side of the intellectual stardom driving the dynasty was a destructive compulsion that left clan members crippled by their personal demons of chronic depression, alcoholism, drug abuse and even madness and suicide. Rife with authentic conversations and riveting quotes, The Magnificent Medills is the premiere cultural history of America’s first media empire. This dynamic family and their brilliance, eccentricities and ultimate self-destruction are explored in a sweeping narrative that interweaves the family’s personal activities and public achievements against a larger historical background. Authoritative, compelling and thoroughly engaging, The Magnificent Medills brings the pages of history that the Medills wrote vividly to life.