We the Students

Author: Jamin B. Raskin
Publisher: CQ Press
ISBN: 9781483319452
Release Date: 2014-07-03
Genre: Law

We the Students is a highly acclaimed resource that has introduced thousands of students to the field of legal studies by covering Supreme Court issues that directly affect them. It examines topics such as students’ access to judicial process; religion in schools; school discipline and punishment; and safety, discrimination and privacy at school. Through meaningful and engagingly written commentary, excerpts of Supreme Court cases (with students as the litigants), and exercises and class projects, author Jamie B. Raskin provides students with the tools they need to gain a deeper appreciation of democratic freedoms and challenges, and underscores their responsibility in preserving constitutional principles. Completely revised and updated, the new, Fourth Edition of We the Students incorporates new Supreme Court cases, new examples, and new exercises to bring constitutional issues to life.

Landmark Supreme Court Cases

Author: Donald E. Lively
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 0313306028
Release Date: 1999
Genre: Law

Surveys the Supreme Court cases that most affected developments in government power, economic regulation, equality, and individual rights, tracing changes in the Court's views and the context and results of each case.

The Case Against the Supreme Court

Author: Erwin Chemerinsky
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9780698176317
Release Date: 2014-09-25
Genre: Political Science

A preeminent constitutional scholar offers a hard-hitting analysis of the Supreme Court over the last two hundred years Most Americans share the perception that the Supreme Court is objective, but Erwin Chemerinsky, one of the country’s leading constitutional lawyers, shows that this is nonsense and always has been. The Court is made up of fallible individuals who base decisions on their own biases. Today, the Roberts Court is promoting a conservative agenda under the guise of following a neutral methodology, but notorious decisions, such as Bush vs. Gore and Citizens United, are hardly recent exceptions. This devastating book details, case by case, how the Court has largely failed throughout American history at its most important tasks and at the most important times. Only someone of Chemerinsky’s stature and breadth of knowledge could take on this controversial topic. Powerfully arguing for term limits for justices and a reassessment of the institution as a whole, The Case Against the Supreme Court is a timely and important book that will be widely read and cited for decades to come. From the Hardcover edition.

Childhood and Adolescence in Society

Author: CQ Researcher,
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 9781452236063
Release Date: 2011-01-07
Genre: Psychology

About CQ Researcher Readers In the tradition of nonpartisan and current analysis that is the hallmark of CQ Press, CQ Researcher readers investigate important and controversial policy issues. Childhood and Adolescence in Society aims to promote in-depth discussion, facilitate further research, and help readers formulate their own positions on crucial issues in the field, such as child soldiers, teen pregnancy, and violence and bullying. Offer your students the balanced reporting, complete overviews, and engaging writing that CQ Researcher has consistently provided for more than 80 years. Each article gives substantial background and analysis of a particular issue as well as useful pedagogical features to inspire critical thinking and to help students grasp and review key material. Key Features Pro/con boxes that examine two competing sides of a single question Detailed chronologies of key dates and events Annotated bibliographies and web resources Outlook sections that address possible regulation and initiatives from Capitol Hill and the White House over the next 5 to 10 years Photos, charts, graphs, and maps

Lau V Nichols

Author: Stephanie Sammartino McPherson
Publisher: Enslow Pub Incorporated
ISBN: UTEXAS:059173010252536
Release Date: 2000
Genre: Juvenile Nonfiction

Examines the 1974 Supreme Court case in which a group of Chinese American parents sued the San Francisco School Board on behalf of their children for not providing a special learning environment for Chinese-speaking students.

Overruling Democracy

Author: Jamin B. Raskin
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781135952716
Release Date: 2004-06-01
Genre: Law

The Supreme Court has recently issued decisions announcing that citizens have neither a constitutional right to vote, nor the right to an education. Conservative judges have continually disavowed claims to any rights not specifically mentioned in the Constitution. In "Overruling Democracy, " celebrated law professor Jamin B. Raskin, argues that we need to develop a whole new set of rights, through amendments or court decisions, that revitalize and protect the democracy of everyday life. Detailing specific cases through interesting narratives, "Overruling Democracy" describes the transgressions of the Supreme Court against the Constitution and the people - and the faulty reasoning behind them -- and lays out the plan for the best way to back a more democratic system.

The U S Supreme Court

Author: Linda Greenhouse
Publisher: OUP USA
ISBN: 9780199754540
Release Date: 2012-03-12
Genre: History

A Supreme Court reporter offers an introduction to one of the pillars of American government, focusing on the people and traditions of the U.S. Supreme Court and examining many individual Supreme Court cases.

Storming the Court

Author: Brandt Goldstein
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9780743274760
Release Date: 2005-09-27
Genre: Law

A tale more riveting than fiction, Storming the Court is the true story of idealistic law students who challenged the United States government in a battle for freedom and human rights that went all the way to the Supreme Court -- and resonates today more than ever. In 1992, three hundred innocent men, women, and children who had qualified for political asylum in the United States were forced into a detention camp at the American naval base at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, and told they might never be freed. Storming the Court takes readers inside this modern-day atrocity to tell the tale of Yvonne Pascal -- a young, charismatic activist -- and other Haitian refugees who had fled their violent homeland only to end up prisoners at Guantánamo. They had no lawyers, no contact with the outside world, and no hope...except for a band of students at Yale Law School fifteen hundred miles away. Led by Harold Koh, a gifted but untested law professor, these remarkable twentysomethings waged a legal war against two U.S. presidents to defend the Constitution and the principles symbolized by the Statue of Liberty. It was an education in law unlike any other. With the refugees' lives at stake, the students threw aside classes and career plans to fight an army of government attorneys in a case so politically volatile that the White House itself intervened in the legal strategy. Featuring a real-life cast that includes Kenneth Starr and other top Justice Department officials, U.S. marines, radical human-rights lawyers, and Presidents George H. W. Bush and Bill Clinton, Storming the Court follows the students from the classrooms at Yale to the prison camp at Guantánamo to the federal courts in New York and Washington as they struggle to save Yvonne Pascal and her fellow Haitian refugees. At a time when the treatment of post-9/11 Guantánamo detainees has been challenged in the public arena and the courts, this book traces the origins of the legal battle over America's use of the naval base as a prison and illuminates the troubling ways that politics can influence legal decisions. Above all, though, Storming the Court is the David-and-Goliath story of a group of passionate law students who took on their government in the name of the greatest of American values: freedom.

Missoula

Author: Jon Krakauer
Publisher: Anchor
ISBN: 9780385538749
Release Date: 2015-04-21
Genre: True Crime

From bestselling author Jon Krakauer, a stark, powerful, meticulously reported narrative about a series of sexual assaults at the University of Montana ­— stories that illuminate the human drama behind the national plague of campus rape Missoula, Montana, is a typical college town, with a highly regarded state university, bucolic surroundings, a lively social scene, and an excellent football team — the Grizzlies — with a rabid fan base. The Department of Justice investigated 350 sexual assaults reported to the Missoula police between January 2008 and May 2012. Few of these assaults were properly handled by either the university or local authorities. In this, Missoula is also typical. A DOJ report released in December of 2014 estimates 110,000 women between the ages of eighteen and twenty-four are raped each year. Krakauer’s devastating narrative of what happened in Missoula makes clear why rape is so prevalent on American campuses, and why rape victims are so reluctant to report assault. Acquaintance rape is a crime like no other. Unlike burglary or embezzlement or any other felony, the victim often comes under more suspicion than the alleged perpetrator. This is especially true if the victim is sexually active; if she had been drinking prior to the assault — and if the man she accuses plays on a popular sports team. The vanishingly small but highly publicized incidents of false accusations are often used to dismiss her claims in the press. If the case goes to trial, the woman’s entire personal life becomes fair game for defense attorneys. This brutal reality goes a long way towards explaining why acquaintance rape is the most underreported crime in America. In addition to physical trauma, its victims often suffer devastating psychological damage that leads to feelings of shame, emotional paralysis and stigmatization. PTSD rates for rape victims are estimated to be 50%, higher than soldiers returning from war. In Missoula, Krakauer chronicles the searing experiences of several women in Missoula — the nights when they were raped; their fear and self-doubt in the aftermath; the way they were treated by the police, prosecutors, defense attorneys; the public vilification and private anguish; their bravery in pushing forward and what it cost them. Some of them went to the police. Some declined to go to the police, or to press charges, but sought redress from the university, which has its own, non-criminal judicial process when a student is accused of rape. In two cases the police agreed to press charges and the district attorney agreed to prosecute. One case led to a conviction; one to an acquittal. Those women courageous enough to press charges or to speak publicly about their experiences were attacked in the media, on Grizzly football fan sites, and/or to their faces. The university expelled three of the accused rapists, but one was reinstated by state officials in a secret proceeding. One district attorney testified for an alleged rapist at his university hearing. She later left the prosecutor’s office and successfully defended the Grizzlies’ star quarterback in his rape trial. The horror of being raped, in each woman’s case, was magnified by the mechanics of the justice system and the reaction of the community. Krakauer’s dispassionate, carefully documented account of what these women endured cuts through the abstract ideological debate about campus rape. College-age women are not raped because they are promiscuous, or drunk, or send mixed signals, or feel guilty about casual sex, or seek attention. They are the victims of a terrible crime and deserving of compassion from society and fairness from a justice system that is clearly broken.

A Student s Guide to Hearsay

Author: Clifford S. Fishman
Publisher: LexisNexis
ISBN: 9780327174332
Release Date: 2014-01-03
Genre: Law

The overarching objective of A Student's Guide to Hearsay is to help students sort out the complexities of the hearsay rule, its exceptions, and the Sixth Amendment Confrontation Clause. For each exception, this book: • Outlines the policies underlying the exception; • Lists and explains the requirements that must be satisfied for evidence to be admitted under the exception; • Explains additional issues that have arisen or are likely to arise; • Explains how the rule interacts with other rules ; • Discusses tactical and procedural considerations that must be understood to appreciate how the rule plays in court; and • Provides review questions and answers that allow students to test their understanding and applications of the rules. The book also includes humorous references addressing the hearsay significance of a ham sandwich, Humpty Dumpty, the Greek god of wine, Tim McGraw, dog saliva, Derek Jeter, a squeaky boot, Leonardo DiCaprio, the French Army, the speed of sound, Commander Data, and the Chicago Cubs. The 4th edition is based on the text of the restyled Federal Rules of Evidence that will become effective December 1, 2011. It includes a detailed discussion of every Supreme Court Confrontation Clause decision from Crawford to Bryant, and also discusses the Bullcoming case which the Court will probably decide sometime this year. It includes a link to the author's web page on which updates to the Guide will be posted.

Let the Students Speak

Author: David L. Hudson
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 9780807044582
Release Date: 2011-08-16
Genre: Education

From a trusted scholar and powerful story teller, an accessible and lively history of free speech, for and about students. Let the Students Speak! details the rich history and growth of the First Amendment in public schools, from the early nineteenth-century's failed student free-expression claims to the development of protection for students by the U.S. Supreme Court. David Hudson brings this history vividly alive by drawing from interviews with key student litigants in famous cases, including John Tinker of Tinker v. Des Moines Independent School District and Joe Frederick of the "Bong Hits 4 Jesus" case, Morse v. Frederick. He goes on to discuss the raging free-speech controversies in public schools today, including dress codes and uniforms, cyberbullying, and the regulation of any violent-themed expression in a post-Columbine and Virginia Tech environment. This book should be required reading for students, teachers, and school administrators alike. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Mismatch

Author: Richard Sander
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 9780465030019
Release Date: 2012-10-09
Genre: Law

Affirmative action in higher education started in the late 1960s as a noble effort to jump-start racial integration in American society and create the conditions for genuine equal opportunity. Forty years later, it has evolved into a swampland of posturing, concealment, pork-barrel set-asides, and--worst of all--a preferences system so blind to its own shortcomings that it ends up hurting the very minorities educators set out to help. Over the past several years, economist, law professor and civil rights activist Richard Sander has led a national consortium of more than two dozen nonpartisan scholars to study the operation and effects of preferences in higher education. In Mismatch, he and journalist Stuart Taylor present a rich and data-driven picture of the way affirmative action works (and doesn't work) in this setting. Though their liberal leanings would indicate support for race-based policies, Sander and Taylor argue that the research shows that affirmative action does not in fact help minorities. Racial preferences in higher education put a great many students in educational settings where they have no hope of competing--a phenomenon that they call "mismatch." American law schools provide a particularly vivid illustration of how "mismatch" harms the educations and careers of many minority students. Compelling evidence shows that racial preferences double the rate at which black students fail bar exams and may well in the end reduce, rather than increase, the aggregate number of black lawyers. Moreover, because preferences are targeted at upper-middle class minorities, they help shut low-income students of all races out of much of higher education. If you're black and poor--or white and poor, for that matter--your chances of stepping into the halls of some of the nation's most elite institutions are no greater than they were in the 1960s. Unfortunately, the academic establishment is only committed to symbolic change, and it will undermine any research that contests its reflexive political correctness and challenges its sacred cows. Sander and Taylor argue that university leaders and much of America's elite have become so deeply committed to an ideology of racial preferences, and so distrustful of broader American public opinion on these issues, that they have widely embraced regimes that ignore the law, hide data, and put out systematic misinformation on their own racial policies. Sander and Taylor conclude by looking at data on how to level the racial playing field in higher education. Existing studies, they argue, suggest that early childhood interventions are much more likely to produce success down the line.

The American Supreme Court

Author: Robert G. McCloskey
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226556833
Release Date: 2010-07-15
Genre: Law

Celebrating its fiftieth anniversary, Robert McCloskey’s classic work on the Supreme Court’s role in constructing the U.S. Constitution has introduced generations of students to the workings of our nation’s highest court. For this new fifth edition, Sanford Levinson extends McCloskey’s magisterial treatment to address the Court’s most recent decisions. As in prior editions, McCloskey’s original text remains unchanged. In his historical interpretation, he argues that the strength of the Court has always been its sensitivity to the changing political scene, as well as its reluctance to stray too far from the main currents of public sentiments. In two revised chapters, Levinson shows how McCloskey’s approach continues to illuminate developments since 2005, including the Court’s decisions in cases arising out of the War on Terror, which range from issues of civil liberty to tests of executive power. He also discusses the Court’s skepticism regarding campaign finance regulation; its affirmation of the right to bear arms; and the increasingly important nomination and confirmation process of Supreme Court justices, including that of the first Hispanic justice, Sonia Sotomayor. The best and most concise account of the Supreme Court and its place in American politics, McCloskey's wonderfully readable book is an essential guide to the past, present, and future prospects of this institution.