Law and Revolution the Formation of the Western Legal Tradition

Author: Harold J. Berman
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674020855
Release Date: 2009-06-01
Genre: Law

The roots of modern Western legal institutions and concepts go back nine centuries to the Papal Revolution, when the Western church established its political and legal unity and its independence from emperors, kings, and feudal lords. Out of this upheaval came the Western idea of integrated legal systems consciously developed over generations and centuries. Harold J. Berman describes the main features of these systems of law, including the canon law of the church, the royal law of the major kingdoms, the urban law of the newly emerging cities, feudal law, manorial law, and mercantile law. In the coexistence and competition of these systems he finds an important source of the Western belief in the supremacy of law. Written simply and dramatically, carrying a wealth of detail for the scholar but also a fascinating story for the layman, the book grapples with wideranging questions of our heritage and our future. One of its main themes is the interaction between the Western belief in legal evolution and the periodic outbreak of apocalyptic revolutionary upheavals. Berman challenges conventional nationalist approaches to legal history, which have neglected the common foundations of all Western legal systems. He also questions conventional social theory, which has paid insufficient attention to the origin of modem Western legal systems and has therefore misjudged the nature of the crisis of the legal tradition in the twentieth century.

Western Legal Theory

Author: Augusto Zimmermann
Publisher: Butterworth-Heinemann
ISBN: 0409333182
Release Date: 2013
Genre: Jurisprudence

Western Legal Theory: History, Concepts and Perspectives enable readers to gain a holistic appreciation of the law by presenting a broad collection of ideas concerning the nature of law. The author draws from a number of social disciplines to provide a rounded sense of what law really is and how it should work in society. The text discusses a wide range of theories and theorists, and also traces the historical developments of Western legal thought from ancient times to the present day. With a focus on the historical and contemporary role of philosophy in the interpretation of law, Western Legal Theory: History, Concepts and Perspectives provide a fascinating insight into the development of law and a comprehensive analysis of current legal thought. It is ideal for students of legal theory and jurisprudence, legal history, political philosophy, and legal practitioners and general readers interested in the theories underpinning our legal institutions and framework.

The Formation and Transmission of Western Legal Culture

Author: Serge Dauchy
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9783319455679
Release Date: 2016-12-01
Genre: Law

This volume surveys 150 law books of fundamental importance in the history of Western legal literature and culture. The entries are organized in three sections: the first dealing with the transitional period of fifteenth-century editions of medieval authorities, the second spanning the early modern period from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century, and the third focusing on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The contributors are scholars from all over the world. Each ‘old book’ is analyzed by a recognized specialist in the specific field of interest. Individual entries give a short biography of the author and discuss the significance of the works in the time and setting of their publication, and in their broader influence on the development of law worldwide. Introductory essays explore the development of Western legal traditions, especially the influence of the English common law, and of Roman and canon law on legal writers, and the borrowings and interaction between them. The book goes beyond the study of institutions and traditions of individual countries to chart a broader perspective on the transmission of legal concepts across legal, political, and geographical boundaries. Examining the branches of this genealogical tree of books makes clear their pervasive influence on modern legal systems, including attempts at rationalizing custom or creating new hybrid systems by transplanting Western legal concepts into other jurisdictions.

Globalisation and the Western Legal Tradition

Author: David B. Goldman
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781139467353
Release Date: 2008-02-07
Genre: Law

What can 'globalisation' teach us about law in the Western tradition? This important new work seeks to explore that question by analysing key ideas and events in the Western legal tradition, including the Papal Revolution, the Protestant Reformations and the Enlightenment. Addressing the role of law, morality and politics, it looks at the creation of orders which offer the possibility for global harmony, in particular the United Nations and the European Union. It also considers the unification of international commercial laws in the attempt to understand Western law in a time of accelerating cultural interconnections. The title will appeal to scholars of legal history and globalisation as well as students of jurisprudence and all those trying to understand globalisation and the Western dynamic of law and authority.

Law in the Western United States

Author: Gordon Morris Bakken
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806132159
Release Date: 2000
Genre: Law

In this volume, Gordon Morris Bakken traces the distinctive development of western legal history. The contributors' essays provide succinct descriptions of major cases, legislation, and individual western states' constitutional provisions that are unique in the American legal system. To assist the reader, the volume is organized by subject, including natural resources, municipal authority, business regulation, American Indian sovereignty and water rights, women, and Mormons. Contributors are: Roy H. Andes, Dana Blakemore, Richard Griswold del Castillo, Susan Badger Doyle, James W. Ely, Jr., Brenda Gail Farrington, Dale D. Goble, Neil Greenwood, Vanessa Gunther, Louise A Halper, Claudia Hess, Kenneth Hough, Paul Kens, Shenandoah Grant Lynd, Thomas C. Mackey, Nicholas George Malavis, Timothy Miller, Danelle Moon, Andrew P. Morriss, Keith Pacholl, Laurie Caroline Pintar, Michael A. Powell, Ion Puschilla, Emily Rader, Peter L. Reich, John Phillip Reid, Lucy E. Salyer, Susan Sanchez, Janet Schmelzer, Howard Shorr, Paul Reed Spitzzeri, John Joseph Stanley, Donald L. Stelluto, Jr., Timothy A. Strand, Imre Sutton, Nancy J. Taniguchi, and Lonnie Wilson.

Money in the Western Legal Tradition

Author: David Fox
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780191059186
Release Date: 2016-01-28
Genre: Law

Monetary law is essential to the functioning of private transactions and international dealings by the state: nearly every legal transaction has a monetary aspect. Money in the Western Legal Tradition presents the first comprehensive analysis of Western monetary law, covering the civil law and Anglo-American common law legal systems from the High Middle Ages up to the middle of the 20th century. Weaving a detailed tapestry of the changing concepts of money and private transactions throughout the ages, the contributors investigate the special contribution made by legal scholars and practitioners to our understanding of money and the laws that govern it. Divided in five parts, the book begins with the coin currency of the Middle Ages, moving through the invention of nominalism in the early modern period to cashless payment and the rise of the banking system and paper money, then charting the progression to fiat money in the modern era. Each part commences with an overview of the monetary environment for the historical period written by an economic historian or numismatist. These are followed by chapters describing the legal doctrines of each period in civil and common law. Each section contains examples of contemporary litigation or statute law which engages with the distinctive issues affecting the monetary law of the period. This interdisciplinary approach reveals the distinctive conception of money prevalent in each period, which either facilitated or hampered the implementation of economic policy and the operation of private transactions.

The Origins of the Western Legal Tradition

Author: Ellen Goodman
Publisher: Federation Press
ISBN: 1862871817
Release Date: 1995-01
Genre: Law

Ellen Goodman uses extensive extracts from original writings to highlight the main themes of the Western legal tradition. The strength of the book is its clear focus on the heart of the tradition: constitutionalism, representative institutions and rule by law. Goodman links Christianity to its origins in Greek philosophy and Judaism. She delves into the position of the Roman Church as the tenuous, Dark Ages conduit. Feudalism lives and dies and the common law and parliament emerge. The author accurately and vividly charts the main currents, avoiding both the shoals and the myriad tributaries, and so enables readers to have a clearer and deeper understanding of our present legal system.

Medieval Church Law and the Origins of the Western Legal Tradition

Author: Kenneth Pennington
Publisher: CUA Press
ISBN: 9780813214627
Release Date: 2006
Genre: History

In this volume leading scholars from around the world discuss the contribution of medieval church law to the origins of the western legal tradition. Subdivided into four topical categories, the essays cover the entire range of the history of medieval canon law from the sixth to the sixteenth century.

The American Indian in Western Legal Thought

Author: Robert A. Williams Jr.
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0198021739
Release Date: 1992-11-26
Genre: Law

Exploring the history of contemporary legal thought on the rights and status of the West's colonized indigenous tribal peoples, Williams here traces the development of the themes that justified and impelled Spanish, English, and American conquests of the New World.

Law as Culture and Culture as Law

Author: John Phillip Reid
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 0945612745
Release Date: 2000-01-01
Genre: History

Law as Culture and Culture as Law presents a spectrum of historical inquiries developing and engaging John Phillip Reid's insights and methodological approaches to legal and constitutional history. The essays gathered in this volume span nearly three centuries and two continents, ranging from the agonizing struggles over law, religion, and governance in late seventeenth-century Ireland to the legal and constitutional regimes of governmental regulation in twentieth-century New York.

Law in the West

Author: Gordon Morris Bakken
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 0815334613
Release Date: 2001-01
Genre: History

This anthology examines Love's Labours Lost from a variety of perspectives and through a wide range of materials. Selections discuss the play in terms of historical context, dating, and sources; character analysis; comic elements and verbal conceits; evidence of authorship; performance analysis; and feminist interpretations. Alongside theater reviews, production photographs, and critical commentary, the volume also includes essays written by practicing theater artists who have worked on the play. An index by name, literary work, and concept rounds out this valuable resource.

Entanglements in Legal History Conceptual Approaches

Author: Thomas Duve
Publisher: epubli
ISBN: 9783944773001
Release Date: 2014-11-20
Genre: History

Legal history offers a broad panorama of transfers, transplants and receptions of law. What are the conceptual tools and methods that legal historians are employing to understand these processes?

The Prince and the Law 1200 1600

Author: Kenneth Pennington
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520913035
Release Date: 1993-06-03
Genre: History

The power of the prince versus the rights of his subjects is one of the basic struggles in the history of law and government. In this masterful history of monarchy, conceptions of law, and due process, Kenneth Pennington addresses that struggle and opens an entirely new vista in the study of Western legal tradition. Pennington investigates legal interpretations of the monarch's power from the twelfth to the seventeenth century. Then, tracing the evolution of defendants' rights, he demonstrates that the origins of due process are not rooted in English common law as is generally assumed. It was not a sturdy Anglo-Saxon, but, most probably, a French jurist of the late thirteenth century who wrote, "A man is innocent until proven guilty." This is the first book to examine in detail the origins of our concept of due process. It also reveals a fascinating paradox: while a theory of individual rights was evolving, so, too, was the concept of the prince's "absolute power." Pennington illuminates this paradox with a clarity that will greatly interest students of political theory as well as legal historians.