When I Wear My Alligator Boots

Author: Shaylih Muehlmann
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520957183
Release Date: 2013-11-09
Genre: Social Science

When I Wear My Alligator Boots examines how the lives of dispossessed men and women are affected by the rise of narcotrafficking along the U.S.-Mexico border. In particular, the book explores a crucial tension at the heart of the "war on drugs": despite the violence and suffering brought on by drug cartels, for the rural poor in Mexico’s north, narcotrafficking offers one of the few paths to upward mobility and is a powerful source of cultural meanings and local prestige. In the borderlands, traces of the drug trade are everywhere: from gang violence in cities to drug addiction in rural villages, from the vibrant folklore popularized in the narco-corridos of Norteña music to the icon of Jesús Malverde, the "patron saint" of narcos, tucked beneath the shirts of local people. In When I Wear My Alligator Boots, the author explores the everyday reality of the drug trade by living alongside its low-level workers, who live at the edges of the violence generated by the militarization of the war on drugs. Rather than telling the story of the powerful cartel leaders, the book focuses on the women who occasionally make their sandwiches, the low-level businessmen who launder their money, the addicts who consume their products, the mules who carry their money and drugs across borders, and the men and women who serve out prison sentences when their bosses' operations go awry.

When I Wear My Alligator Boots

Author: Shaylih Muehlmann
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520276789
Release Date: 2013-11-09
Genre: SOCIAL SCIENCE

"This book tells the story of the poor, often indigenous workers living in the borderlands who are recruited to work in the lowest echelons of the drug trade, as burreros (mules) and narcotraficantes (traffickers). Shayleh Muehlmann spent over a year researching in a small community in the borderlands. This book brings her stories to a wider public, narrating the experiences of a group of indigenous fishermen in northern Mexico who have become involved in the drug trade, and exploring how the narco-economy has provided a reprieve for men and women attempting to survive while their primary form of livelihood, fishing, has been criminalized by the state because of its alleged negative environmental impact. The book examines the rise of narcotrafficking as one of the economic alternatives sought by local people and how this work is seen by many as a way of resisting forms of domination imposed on them by both the Mexican and U.S. governments. Muehlmann explores a tension at the heart of the "war on drugs." For many men and women living in poverty, the narco-economy represents an alternative to the exploitation and alienation they experience trying to work in the borderland's legal economy which has been increasingly dominated by the presence of U.S.-owned maquiladoras (assembly plants) and ravaged by environmental degradation. Despite the lawlessness and violence of the cartels and the ruinous consequences this process has had for some of the most vulnerable people involved, narco-trafficking represents one of the few promises of upward mobility for the indigenous poor in Mexico's north. "--

When I Wear My Alligator Boots

Author: Shaylih Muehlmann
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520276772
Release Date: 2013-11-09
Genre: SOCIAL SCIENCE

"This book tells the story of the poor, often indigenous workers living in the borderlands who are recruited to work in the lowest echelons of the drug trade, as burreros (mules) and narcotraficantes (traffickers). Shayleh Muehlmann spent over a year researching in a small community in the borderlands. This book brings her stories to a wider public, narrating the experiences of a group of indigenous fishermen in northern Mexico who have become involved in the drug trade, and exploring how the narco-economy has provided a reprieve for men and women attempting to survive while their primary form of livelihood, fishing, has been criminalized by the state because of its alleged negative environmental impact. The book examines the rise of narcotrafficking as one of the economic alternatives sought by local people and how this work is seen by many as a way of resisting forms of domination imposed on them by both the Mexican and U.S. governments. Muehlmann explores a tension at the heart of the "war on drugs." For many men and women living in poverty, the narco-economy represents an alternative to the exploitation and alienation they experience trying to work in the borderland's legal economy which has been increasingly dominated by the presence of U.S.-owned maquiladoras (assembly plants) and ravaged by environmental degradation. Despite the lawlessness and violence of the cartels and the ruinous consequences this process has had for some of the most vulnerable people involved, narco-trafficking represents one of the few promises of upward mobility for the indigenous poor in Mexico's north. "--Provided by publisher.

Where the River Ends

Author: Shaylih Muehlmann
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822354451
Release Date: 2013-05-23
Genre: History

Where the River Ends examines the response of the Cucapá people of Mexico's northwest coast to the state's claim that they are not "indigenous enough" to merit the special fishing rights which would allow them to subsist during environmental crisis.

Migrants and Strangers in an African City

Author: Bruce Whitehouse
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 9780253000750
Release Date: 2012-03-14
Genre: Social Science

In cities throughout Africa, local inhabitants live alongside large populations of "strangers." Bruce Whitehouse explores the condition of strangerhood for residents who have come from the West African Sahel to settle in Brazzaville, Congo. Whitehouse considers how these migrants live simultaneously inside and outside of Congolese society as merchants, as Muslims in a predominantly non-Muslim society, and as parents seeking to instill in their children the customs of their communities of origin. Migrants and Strangers in an African City challenges Pan-Africanist ideas of transnationalism and diaspora in today’s globalized world.

Fragmented Lives Assembled Parts

Author: Alejandro Lugo
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 9780292778252
Release Date: 2009-09-15
Genre: Political Science

Established in 1659 as Misión de Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe de los Mansos del Paso del Norte, Ciudad Juárez is the oldest colonial settlement on the U.S.-Mexico border-and one of the largest industrialized border cities in the world. Since the days of its founding, Juárez has been marked by different forms of conquest and the quest for wealth as an elaborate matrix of gender, class, and ethnic hierarchies struggled for dominance. Juxtaposing the early Spanish invasions of the region with the arrival of late-twentieth-century industrial "conquistadors," Fragmented Lives, Assembled Parts documents the consequences of imperial history through in-depth ethnographic studies of working-class factory life. By comparing the social and human consequences of recent globalism with the region's pioneer era, Alejandro Lugo demonstrates the ways in which class mobilization is itself constantly being "unmade" at both the international and personal levels for border workers. Both an inside account of maquiladora practices and a rich social history, this is an interdisciplinary survey of the legacies, tropes, economic systems, and gender-based inequalities reflected in a unique cultural landscape. Through a framework of theoretical conceptualizations applied to a range of facets—from multiracial "mestizo" populations to the notions of border "crossings" and "inspections," as well as the recent brutal killings of working-class women in Ciudad Juárez—Fragmented Lives, Assembled Parts provides a critical understanding of the effect of transnational corporations on contemporary Mexico, calling for official recognition of the desperate need for improved working and living conditions within this community.

Days of Death Days of Life

Author: Kristin Norget
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231136891
Release Date: 2006
Genre: Social Science

Kristin Norget explores the practice and meanings of death rituals in the popular culture of poor urban neighborhoods on the outskirts of the southern Mexican city of Oaxaca. Norget's work offers an original perspective on the significance of the Day of the Dead and other Oaxacan ritual practices in shaping people's values and social identities. Drawing on her extensive fieldwork in Oaxacan neighborhoods, Norget includes vivid descriptions of Day of the Dead rituals.

Cultural Anthropology

Author: John H. Bodley
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9781442271906
Release Date: 2016-10-24
Genre: Social Science

Cultural Anthropology provides students with the anthropological tools to question and understand their own culture and the world. Key updates for the sixth edition include a shorter length and more streamlined focus, China and Hindu South Asia combined into a single chapter, a new chapter assessing imperialism and the breakdown of states, and more.

Alligator Shoes

Author: Arthur Dorros
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9780140547344
Release Date: 1992-04
Genre: Juvenile Fiction

A Reading Rainbow Book! This zany alligator with a love for footwear is guaranteed to make you laugh--no ifs, and, or boots about it. Alvin the alligator loves to watch people--more specifically, their shoes. But his interest leads to fun and a bit of trouble when he spends the night locked in a shoe store trying on the merchandise! "It's funny immediately."--The Seattle Post-Intelligencer "Dorros [has] a genuine, offhand comic talent."--Kirkus Reviews "In this zany story, the surprise ending carries an artfully-hidden message."--The Weekly Washington

addicted pregnant poor

Author: Kelly Ray Knight
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822375180
Release Date: 2015-10-05
Genre: Social Science

For the addicted, pregnant, and poor women living in daily-rent hotels in San Francisco's Mission district, life is marked by battles against drug cravings, housing debt, and potential violence. In this stunning ethnography Kelly Ray Knight presents these women in all their complex humanity and asks what kinds of futures are possible for them given their seemingly hopeless situation. During her four years of fieldwork Knight documented women’s struggles as they traveled from the street to the clinic, jail, and family court, and back to the hotels. She approaches addicted pregnancy as an everyday phenomenon in these women's lives and describes how they must navigate the tension between pregnancy's demands to stay clean and the pull of addiction and poverty toward drug use and sex work. By creating the space for addicted women's own narratives and examining addicted pregnancy from medical, policy, and social science perspectives, Knight forces us to confront and reconsider the ways we think about addiction, trauma, health, criminality, and responsibility.

Lydia s Open Door

Author: Patty Kelly
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520941618
Release Date: 2008-04-02
Genre: Social Science

In this groundbreaking ethnographic study, Patty Kelly examines the lives of the women who work in the Zona Galactica, a state-run brothel in Chiapas's capital city. By delving into lives that would otherwise go unremarked, Kelly documents the modernization of the sex industry during the neoliberal era in the city of Tuxtla Gutiérrez and illustrates how state-regulated sex became part of a broader effort by government officials to bring modernity to Chiapas, one of Mexico's poorest and most conflicted states. Kelly's innovative approach locates prostitution in a political-economic context by treating it as work. Most valuably, she conveys her analysis through vivid portraits of the lives of the sex workers themselves and shows how the women involved are neither victims nor heroines.

The Power of the Between

Author: Paul Stoller
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226775364
Release Date: 2009-05-15
Genre: Social Science

It is the anthropologist’s fate to always be between things: countries, languages, cultures, even realities. But rather than lament this, anthropologist Paul Stoller here celebrates the creative power of the between, showing how it can transform us, changing our conceptions of who we are, what we know, and how we live in the world. Beginning with his early days with the Peace Corps in Africa and culminating with a recent bout with cancer, The Power of the Between is an evocative account of the circuitous path Stoller’s life has taken, offering a fascinating depiction of how a career is shaped over decades of reading and research. Stoller imparts his accumulated wisdom not through grandiose pronouncements but by drawing on his gift for storytelling. Tales of his apprenticeship to a sorcerer in Niger, his studies with Claude Lévi-Strauss in Paris, and his friendships with West African street vendors in New York City accompany philosophical reflections on love, memory, power, courage, health, and illness. Graced with Stoller’s trademark humor and narrative elegance, The Power of the Between is both the story of a distinguished career and a profound meditation on coming to terms with the impermanence of all things.

Asylum Denied

Author: David Ngaruri Kenney
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520261594
Release Date: 2009-08-17
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

Describes one political refugee's long and difficult struggle through immigration processing, detailing his imprisonment in Kenya, his escape to the U.S., and the ordeal of dealing with a bureaucracy that sought to deport him.

The Transnational Villagers

Author: Peggy Levitt
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520228139
Release Date: 2001-07-29
Genre: Social Science

Increasing numbers of migrants continue to participate in the political, social, and economic lives of their countries of origin even as they put down roots in the USA. This work offers an account of how ordinary people keep their feet in two worlds and create communities that span borders.

Never Trust a Man in Alligator Loafers

Author: Donna Sozio
Publisher: Citadel Press
ISBN: 0806528400
Release Date: 2007
Genre: Family & Relationships

The only guide women will need to navigate the dating world, and to figure out if a guy is right for them, Never Trust a Man in Alligator Loafers is a one-of-a-kind book showing savvy women how to guage a man's heart by looking at his feet! Packed with helpful advice, tips, lists and quizzes, this invaluable guide demonstrates how a man's shoes can answer three crucial questions: who is he? how does he feel about himself? what will he be like in a relationship?