Sweeney Astray

Author: Seamus Heaney
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 9781466855809
Release Date: 2014-01-13
Genre: Poetry

Sweeney Astray is Seamus Heaney's version of the medieval Irish work Buile Suibne. Its hero, Mad Sweeney, undergoes a series of purgatorial adventures after he is cursed by a saint and turned into a bird at the Battle of Moira. Heaney's translation not only restores to us a work of historical and literary importance but offers the genius of one of our greatest living poets to reinforce its claims on the reader of contemporary literature.

The Oxford History of the Irish Book Volume V

Author: Clare Hutton
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199249114
Release Date: 2011-06-23
Genre: History

Part of a series providing an authoritative history of the book in Ireland, this volume comprehensively outlines the history of 20th-century Irish book culture. This book embraces all the written and printed traditions and heritages of Ireland and places them in the global context of a worldwide interest in book histories.

Knowing One s Place in Contemporary Irish and Polish Poetry

Author: Magdalena Kay
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 9781441178435
Release Date: 2012-02-23
Genre: Literary Criticism

Are we allowed to choose where we belong? What pressures make us feel that we should belong somewhere? This book brings together four major poets-Heaney, Mahon, Zagajewski, and Hartwig-who ask themselves these questions throughout their lives. They start by assuming that we can choose not to belong, but know this is easier said than done. Something in them is awry, leading them to travel, emigrate, and return dissatisfied with all forms of belonging. Writer after writer has suggested that Polish and Irish literature bear some uncanny similarities, particularly in the 20th century, but few have explored these similarities in depth. Ireland and Poland, with their tangled histories of colonization, place a large premium upon knowing one's place. What happens, though, when a poet makes a career out of refusing to know her place in the way her culture expects? This book explores the consequences of this refusal, allowing these poets to answer such questions through their own poems, leading to surprising conclusions about the connection of knowledge and belonging, roots and identity.

Poetry in Contemporary Irish Literature

Author: Michael Kenneally
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 086140310X
Release Date: 1995
Genre: Literary Criticism

This is the second of four collections of essays published under the general title Studies in Contemporary Irish Literature which are devoted to critical analysis of Irish writing since the 1950s. Essays in this collection establish some of the defining characteristics of contemporary Irish poetry, examine common features of several groups of poets and present focused analyses of twelve individual poets. The contributors are Elmer Andrews, Rand Brandes, Rory Brennan, Terence Brown, Richard Allen Cave, Tom Clyde, Gerald Dawe, Peter Denman, Maurice Elliott, Eamon Grennan, Edna Longley, Caoimhin MacGiolla Leith, Kathleen McCracken, Peter McDonald, Ron Marken, Gerardine Meaney, Dennis O'Driscoll, Bernard O' Donoghuem Alan Peacock, Linda Revie, Robert Tracy, Stan Smith and Clair Wills.

Seamus Heaney and Medieval Poetry

Author: Conor McCarthy
Publisher: DS Brewer
ISBN: 184384141X
Release Date: 2008
Genre: Literary Criticism

First examination of the use made by Seamus Heaney of medieval poetry in his translations and adaptations, including the acclaimed Beowulf.

Ireland and the Americas

Author: James Patrick Byrne
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 9781851096145
Release Date: 2008-01-01
Genre: History

Provides reference entries on interactions between Ireland and the United States, Canada, and Latin America throughout history and the cultural and political impact these relations have had for each country.

Evaluation and Translation

Author: Carol Maier
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781317640844
Release Date: 2014-04-23
Genre: Language Arts & Disciplines

The definition of value or quality with respect to work in translation has historically been a particularly vexed issue. Today, however, the growing demand for translations in such fields as technology and business and the increased scrutiny of translators' work by scholars in many disciplines is giving rise to a need for more nuanced, more specialized, and more explicit methods of determining value. Some refer to this determination as evaluation, others use the term assessment. Either way, the question is one of measurement and judgement, which are always unavoidably subjective and frequently rest on criteria that are not overtly expressed. This means that devising more complex evaluative practices involves not only quantitative techniques but also an exploration of the attitudes, preferences, or individual values on which criteria are established. Intended as an interrogation and a critique that can serve to prompt a more thorough and open consideration of evaluative criteria, this special issue of The Translator offers examinations of diverse evaluative practices and contains both empirical and hermeneutic work. Topics addressed include the evaluation of student translations using more up-to-date and positive methods such as those employed in corpus studies; the translation of non?standard language; translation into the second language; terminology; the application of theoretical criteria to practice; a social?textual perspective; and the reviewing of literary translations in the press. In addition, reviews by a number of literary translators discuss specific translations both into and out of English.

Seamus Heaney and the Emblems of Hope

Author: Karen Marguerite Moloney
Publisher: University of Missouri Press
ISBN: 9780826265890
Release Date: 2007
Genre: Literary Criticism

"Explores Seamus Heaney's adaptation of the Celtic ritual known as the Feis of Tara, demonstrates the sovereignty motif's continued relevance in works by Irish poets Thomas Kinsella, John Montague, Eavan Boland, and Nuala Ni Dhomhnaill, and refutes criticism that charges sexism and overemphasizes sacrifice in Heaney's poetry"--Provided by publisher.

Immigrant Experiences

Author: Paul H. Elovitz
Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press
ISBN: 0838636918
Release Date: 1997
Genre: Social Science

The editors and contributors of this book represent immigrants, Americans with a strong sense of their immigrant roots, and psychotherapists who have heard the intimate details of immigration experience from patients. Although differences in reasons for immigration, countries of origin, and psychological dynamics are highlighted to alert readers to the dissimilarities in the cultural heritages, similarities in the immigrant experiences dearly emerge.

Border States in the Work of Tom Mac Intyre

Author: Catriona Ryan
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN: 9781443836715
Release Date: 2012-01-17
Genre: Performing Arts

This work analyses the prose and drama of the Irish writer Tom Mac Intyre and the concept of paleo-postmodernism. It examines how Mac Intyre balances traditional themes with experimentation, which in the Irish literary canon is unusual. This book argues that Mac Intyre’s position in the Irish literary canon is an idiosyncratic one in that he combines two contrary aspects of Irish literature: between what Beckett terms as the Yeatsian ‘antiquarians’ who valorize the ‘Victorian Gael’ and the ‘others’ whose aesthetic involves a European-influenced ‘breakdown of the object’ which is associated with Beckett. Mac Intyre’s experimentation involves a breakdown of the object in order to uncover an unconscious Irish mythological and linguistic space in language. His approach to language experimentation is Yeatsian and this is what the author terms as paleo-postmodern. Thus the project considers how Mac Intyre incorporates Yeatsian revivalism with postmodern deconstruction in his drama and short stories.