The Children of H rin

Author: J.R.R. Tolkien
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 9780547952109
Release Date: 2012-02-15
Genre: Fiction

The Children of Húrin is the first complete book by J.R.R.Tolkien since the 1977 publication of The Silmarillion. Six thousand years before the One Ring is destroyed, Middle-earth lies under the shadow of the Dark Lord Morgoth. The greatest warriors among elves and men have perished, and all is in darkness and despair. But a deadly new leader rises, Túrin, son of Húrin, and with his grim band of outlaws begins to turn the tide in the war for Middle-earth—awaiting the day he confronts his destiny and the deadly curse laid upon him. The paperback edition of The Children of Húrin includes eight color paintings by Alan Lee and a black-and-white map.

The Children of H rin

Author: John Ronald Reuel Tolkien
Publisher: HarperCollins UK
ISBN: 9780007246229
Release Date: 2007
Genre: English fiction

Painstakingly restored from Tolkien's manuscripts and presented for the first time as a fully continuous and standalone story, the epic tale of The Children of Húrin will reunite fans of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings with Elves and Men, dragons and Dwarves, eagles and Orcs, and the rich landscape and characters unique to Tolkien. There are tales of Middle-earth from times long before The Lord of the Rings, and the story told in this book is set in the great country that lay beyond the Grey Havens in the West: lands where Treebeard once walked, but which were drowned in the great cataclysm that ended the First Age of the World. In that remote time Morgoth, the first Dark Lord, dwelt in the vast fortress of Angband, the Hells of Iron, in the North; and the tragedy of Túrin and his sister Nienor unfolded within the shadow of the fear of Angband and the war waged by Morgoth against the lands and secret cities of the Elves. Their brief and passionate lives were dominated by the elemental hatred that Morgoth bore them as the children of Húrin, the man who had dared to defy and to scorn him to his face. Against them he sent his most formidable servant, Glaurung, a powerful spirit in the form of a huge wingless dragon of fire. Into this story of brutal conquest and flight, of forest hiding-places and pursuit, of resistance with lessening hope, the Dark Lord and the Dragon enter in direly articulate form. Sardonic and mocking, Glaurung manipulated the fates of Túrin and Nienor by lies of diabolic cunning and guile, and the curse of Morgoth was fulfilled. The earliest versions of this story by J.R.R. Tolkien go back to the end of the First World War and the years that followed; but long afterwards, when The Lord of the Rings was finished, he wrote it anew and greatly enlarged it in complexities of motive and character: it became the dominant story in his later work on Middle-earth. But he could not bring it to a final and finished form. In this book Christopher Tolkien has constructed, after long study of the manuscripts, a coherent narrative without any editorial invention.

Children of H rin

Author: John Ronald Reuel Tolkien
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0618894640
Release Date: 2007
Genre: Fiction

A fantasy adventure saga set in the early days of Middle-Earth features humans and elves, dwarves and dragons, orcs and dark sorcerers clashing in an epic battle between good and evil.

Characters in the Children of H rin

Author: Source Wikipedia
Publisher: Books LLC, Wiki Series
ISBN: 1155947525
Release Date: 2010-05
Genre:

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 25. Chapters: Aerin, Beleg, Brandir, Dorlas, Finduilas, Glaurung, Hurin, Lalaith, Melian, Morgoth, Morwen, Nienor Niniel, Orodreth, Sador, Thingol, Turgon, Turin Turambar. Excerpt: Turin Turambar (pronounced ) is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium. "Turambar and the Foaloke," begun in 1917, is the first appearance of Turin in the legendarium. J.R.R. Tolkien consciously based the lay on the medieval story of Kullervo in the Finnish mythological poem Kalevala, saying that it was "an attempt to reorganize...the tale of Kullervo the hapless, into a form of my own." Also called "The Tale of Grief," "Narn i Chin Hurin," commonly called "The Narn," it tells of the tragic fates of the children of Hurin, namely his son Turin (Turambar) and his daughter Nienor. Excerpts of the story were published before, in The Silmarillion (prose), Unfinished Tales (prose), The Book of Lost Tales Part II (prose), The Lays of Beleriand (verse in alliterative long-lines) and most recently in 1994 in The War of the Jewels (prose), the latter three part of The History of Middle-earth series. Turin Turambar is the primary protagonist and tragic hero of the novel The Children of Hurin, published after Tolkien's death by his son Christopher Tolkien and drawing from many of the above sources to finally present a complete narrative. In the books, Turin was a Man of the First Age of Middle-earth, whose family had been cursed by the ultimate evil being of the legendarium, Morgoth. In course of his unsuccessful attempts to defy the curse, Turin brought ruin upon several Mannish and Elven strongholds as well as upon himself and his sister Nienor Niniel. Their history was recorded in the Tale of the Children of Hurin or Narn i Chin Hurin, which was claimed by Tolkien to be the ultimate source of the published writings. Turin is briefly mentioned in The Fellowship of the Ring, but little more is said than that he was one of "the mighty Elf-friends of old." In The Two Towers, his name is briefly mentioned as a strong warrior. Turin was the son of Hurin Thalion, Lord of the Folk of Hador, and Morwen Eledhwen of the House of Beor. He was born in the month of Gwaero

Tolkien Self and Other

Author: Jane Chance
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9781137398963
Release Date: 2016-11-21
Genre: Literary Criticism

This book examines key points of J. R. R. Tolkien’s life and writing career in relation to his views on humanism and feminism, particularly his sympathy for and toleration of those who are different, deemed unimportant, or marginalized—namely, the Other. Jane Chance argues such empathy derived from a variety of causes ranging from the loss of his parents during his early life to a consciousness of the injustice and violence in both World Wars. As a result of his obligation to research and publish in his field and propelled by his sense of abjection and diminution of self, Tolkien concealed aspects of the personal in relatively consistent ways in his medieval adaptations, lectures, essays, and translations, many only recently published. These scholarly writings blend with and relate to his fictional writings in various ways depending on the moment at which he began teaching, translating, or editing a specific medieval work and, simultaneously, composing a specific poem, fantasy, or fairy-story. What Tolkien read and studied from the time before and during his college days at Exeter and continued researching until he died opens a door into understanding how he uniquely interpreted and repurposed the medieval in constructing fantasy.

Authors of the Early to mid 20th Century

Author: Britannica Educational Publishing
Publisher: Britanncia Educational Publishing
ISBN: 9781622750085
Release Date: 2013-06-01
Genre: Juvenile Nonfiction

Starting at the dawn of the 20th century, writers began experimenting with literary styles as never before. As perhaps the most far-reaching movement, Modernism swept across both the United States and Europe and has been embodied in the works of such writers as Marcel Proust, Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, and T.S. Eliot. The existentialism of Jean-Paul Sartre and Albert Camus, Samuel Beckett’s absurdist writings, and the range of literary output from around the world also reflect the spirit of the period. The lives and works of these and other authors from across the globe are surveyed in this absorbing volume.

J R R Tolkien

Author: Toby Widdicombe
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 9781350092150
Release Date: 2019-11-14
Genre: Literary Criticism

With his richly detailed world of Middle Earth and the epic tales he told around it, J.R.R. Tolkien invented the modern fantasy novel. For readers and students getting to grips with this world for the first time, J.R.R. Tolkien: A Guide for the Perplexed is an essential guide to the author's life and work. The book helps readers explore: · Tolkien's life and times · Tolkien's mythical world · The languages of Middle Earth · The major works – The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings · Posthumously published writings – from The Silmarillion to the recently discovered The Fall of Gondolin With reference to adaptations of Tolkien's work including the Peter Jackson films, notes on Tolkien's sources and surveys of key scholarly and critical writings, this is an accessible and authoritative guide to one of the 20th century's greatest and most popular writers.

Tolkien s Lost Chaucer

Author: John M. Bowers
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780192580306
Release Date: 2019-09-26
Genre: Literary Criticism

Tolkien's Lost Chaucer uncovers the story of an unpublished and previously unknown book by the author of The Lord of the Rings. Tolkien worked between 1922 and 1928 on his Clarendon edition Selections from Chaucer's Poetry and Prose, and though never completed, its 160 pages of commentary reveals much of his thinking about language and storytelling when he was still at the threshold of his career as an epoch-making writer of fantasy literature. Drawing upon other new materials such as his edition of the Reeve's Tale and his Oxford lectures on the Pardoner's Tale, this book reveals Chaucer as a major influence upon Tolkien's literary imagination.

The J R R Tolkien Companion Guide

Author: Christina Scull
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0618391029
Release Date: 2006
Genre: Literary Criticism

An in-depth reference to Tolkien's life and works provides brief alphabetical entries on a wide range of topics that encompass the author's source materials, synopses of his writings, a chronology, analysis of his characters, and the personal and historical influences on his writings.

The Mirror Crack d

Author: Lynn Forest-Hill
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN: STANFORD:36105131748183
Release Date: 2008
Genre: Literary Criticism

Fear and horror are an inextricable part of Tolkien's great mythology and his use of medieval sources for his evocations of fear and horror contribute to the distinctive tone of his work. This collection of essays shows how his masterly narrative techniques transform his sources, both familiar and unfamiliar, so that hitherto benign characters, objects and landscapes, as well as his famous monstrous creations, engage with deeply rooted human fears. The essays, by an international group of scholars, confirm Tolkien's worldwide reputation. They highlight the depiction of the fear associated with marginalised characters; explore the moral implications of light and its absence; consider the subtle distinction between secular and religious spiders; discuss the role of landscapes and natural disasters in the evocation of fear in Middle-earth; and address the spectacular significance of Tolkien's dragons, wolves, and Undead. While some of the essays presented here turn to modern science, psychology, and anthropology to deepen their analyses of fear and horror, they all add depth to our appreciation of Tolkien's most famous and frightening creations by defining their relationships to ancient and culturally significant images of fear and horror.

Braille Books

Author: Library of Congress. National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped
Publisher:
ISBN: STANFORD:36105132171799
Release Date: 2006
Genre: Blind


Cassette Books

Author: Library of Congress. National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped
Publisher:
ISBN: UCR:31210021237654
Release Date: 2009
Genre: Talking books