Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Triumphs, Troubles, and Taboos

Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Historically Black colleges and universities play a vital role in the education of African Americans in the United States. For nearly 150 years, these institutions have trained the leadership of the Black community, graduating the nation s African American teachers, doctors, lawyers, and scientists. Despite the wealth of new research on Black colleges, there are topics that remain untouched and accomplishments that go unnoticed by the scholarly community. The chapters in this edited volume focus on topics that deserve further attention and that will push students, scholars, policymakers, and Black college administrators to reexamine their perspectives on and perceptions of Black colleges.

America's Historically Black Colleges & Universities: A Narrative History, 18372009

America's Historically Black Colleges & Universities: A Narrative History, 18372009

This narrative provides a comprehensive history of America's Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). The book concludes that race, the Civil Rights movements, and black and white philanthropy had much affect on the development of these minority institutions. Northern white philanthropy had much to do with the start and maintenance of the nation's HBCUs from 1837 into the 1940s. Even from 1950 to 1970, HBCUs depended upon financial support of philanthropic groups, benevolent societies, and federal and state government agencies, but the survival of HBCUs became dependent mostly on their own creative responses to the changing environment of higher education and have helped to shape our culture and society.

Federal Science and Technology Support for Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Science, Research, and Technology of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session, October 9, 1987

Federal Science and Technology Support for Historically Black Colleges and Universities


Exploring Diversity at Historically Black Colleges and Universities: Implications for Policy and Practice

New Directions for Higher Education, Number 170

Exploring Diversity at Historically Black Colleges and Universities: Implications for Policy and Practice

Though scholars have explored various topics related to Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), little empirical research has critically examined the increasingly changing racial demography and social diversity of HBCUs and their impact on HBCU stakeholders. This volume provides meaningful context and initiates discussion on the increasingly changing diversity of HBCUs. It: • offers new information that will help HBCUs be more intentional about creating an inclusive campus environment for all enrolled students, • discusses the experiences of LGBT, Latino/a, and other minority students enrolled at HBCUs, and • examines myths and historical contexts of HBCUs. Aside from the practical implications provided herein, the volume also provides salient context for researchers and policymakers interested in the diversification of HBCUs. Given the range and the depth of the issues covered, it is a must read for anyone interested in HBCUs in general and student success within these institutions specifically. This is the 170th volume of the Jossey-Bass quarterly report series New Directions for Higher Education. Addressed to presidents, vice presidents, deans, and other higher education decision makers on all kinds of campuses, it provides timely information and authoritative advice about major issues and administrative problems confronting every institution.

Historically Black

Imagining Community in a Black Historic District

Historically Black

In Historically Black, Mieka Brand Polanco examines the concept of community in the United States: how communities are experienced and understood, the complex relationship between human beings and their social and physical landscapesOCoand how the term community is sometimes conjured to feign a cohesiveness that may not actually exist. Drawing on ethnographic and historical materials from Union, Virginia, Historically Black offers a nuanced and sensitive portrait of a federally recognized Historic District under the category Ethnic HeritageOCoBlack.. Since Union has been home to a racially mixed population since at least the late 19th century, calling it historically black poses some curious existential questions to the black residents who currently live there. UnionOCOs identity as a historically black community encourages a perception of the town as a monochromatic and monohistoric landscape, effectively erasing both old-timer white residents and newcomer black residents while allowing newer white residents to take on a proud role as preservers of history. Gestures to community gloss an oversimplified perspective of race, history and space that conceals much of the richness (and contention) of lived reality in Union, as well as in the larger United States. They allow Americans to avoid important conversations about the complex and unfolding nature by which groups of people and social/physical landscapes are conceptualized as a single unified whole. This multi-layered, multi-textured ethnography explores a key concept, inviting public conversation about the dynamic ways in which race, space, and history inform our experiences and understanding of community."