The Penguin Arthur Miller

Collected Plays (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition)

The Penguin Arthur Miller

To celebrate the centennial of his birth, the collected plays of America’s greatest twentieth-century dramatist in a beautiful bespoke hardcover edition In the history of postwar American art and politics, Arthur Miller casts a long shadow as a playwright of stunning range and power whose works held up a mirror to America and its shifting values. The Penguin Arthur Miller celebrates Miller’s creative and intellectual legacy by bringing together the breadth of his plays, which span the decades from the 1930s to the new millennium. From his quiet debut, The Man Who Had All the Luck, and All My Sons, the follow-up that established him as a major talent, to career hallmarks like The Crucible and Death of a Salesman, and later works like Mr. Peters’ Connections and Resurrection Blues, the range and courage of Miller’s moral and artistic vision are here on full display. This lavish bespoke edition, specially produced to commemorate the Miller centennial, is a must-have for devotees of Miller’s work. The Penguin Arthur Miller will ensure a permanent place on any bookshelf for the full span of Miller’s extraordinary dramatic career. The Penguin Arthur Miller includes: The Man Who Had All the Luck, All My Sons, Death of a Salesman, An Enemy of the People, The Crucible, A View from the Bridge, After the Fall, Incident at Vichy, The Price, The Creation of the World and Other Business, The Archbishop’s Ceiling, The American Clock, Playing for Time, The Ride Down Mt. Morgan, The Last Yankee, Broken Glass, Mr. Peters’ Connections, and Resurrection Blues. From the Hardcover edition.

The Crucible

A Play in Four Acts

The Crucible

Arthur Miller's classic parable of mass hysteria draws a chilling parallel between the Salem witch-hunt of 1692 - 'one of the strangest and most awful chapters in human history' - and the McCarthyism which gripped America in the 1950s. The story of how the small community of Salem is stirred into madness by superstition, paranoia and malice, culminating in a violent climax, is a savage attack on the evils of mindless persecution and the terrifying power of false accusations.

The Portable Arthur Miller

The Portable Arthur Miller

Containing in full Miller's masterpieces "The Crucible" and "Death of a Salesman, " this collection comprises 60 years of writing from America's greatest living playwright.

The Man Who Had All the Luck

The Man Who Had All the Luck

The forgotten classic that launched the career of one of America's greatest playwrights It took more than fifty years for The Man Who Had All the Luck to be appreciated for what it truly is: the first stirrings of a genius that would go on to blossom in such masterpieces as Death of a Salesman and The Crucible. Infused with the moral malaise of the Depression era, the parable-like drama centers on David Beeves, a man whose every obstacle to personal and professional success seems to crumble before him with ease. But his good fortune merely serves to reveal the tragedies of those around him in greater relief, offering what David believes to be evidence of a capricious god or, worse, a godless, arbitrary universe. David’s journey toward fulfillment becomes a nightmare of existential doubts, a desperate grasp for reason in a cosmos seemingly devoid of any, and a struggle that will take him to the brink of madness. This Penguin Classics edition includes an introduction by Christopher Bigsby. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

All My Sons

All My Sons

In Joe and Kate Keller's family garden, an apple tree - a memorial to their son Larry, lost in the Second World War - has been torn down by a storm. But his loss is not the only part of the family's past they can't put behind them. Not everybody's forgotten the court case that put Joe's partner in jail, or the cracked engine heads his factory produced which caused it and dropped twenty-one pilots out of the sky ...

The Price

The Price

Victor, a New York cop nearing retirement, moves among furniture in the disused attic of a house marked for demolition. Cabinets, desks, a damaged harp, an overstuffed armchair - the relics of a lost life of affluence he's finally come to sell. But when his brother Walter, who he hasn't spoken to in years, arrives, the talk stops being just about whether Victor's been offered a fair price for the furniture, and turns to the price that one and not the other of them paid when their father lost both his fortune and the will to go on ...

Death of a Salesman

Death of a Salesman

The Pulitzer Prize-winning tragedy of a salesman’s deferred American dream Ever since it was first performed in 1949, Death of a Salesman has been recognized as a milestone of the American theater. In the person of Willy Loman, the aging, failing salesman who makes his living riding on a smile and a shoeshine, Arthur Miller redefined the tragic hero as a man whose dreams are at once insupportably vast and dangerously insubstantial. He has given us a figure whose name has become a symbol for a kind of majestic grandiosity—and a play that compresses epic extremes of humor and anguish, promise and loss, between the four walls of an American living room. "By common consent, this is one of the finest dramas in the whole range of the American theater." —Brooks Atkinson, The New York Times "So simple, central, and terrible that the run of playwrights would neither care nor dare to attempt it." —Time

Echoes Down the Corridor

Collected Essays, 1944-2000

Echoes Down the Corridor

Essays by the great American playwright and intellectual cover the trial of Ezra Pound, McCarthyism, Vietnam, Watergate, and Monica Lewinsky, among other weighty issues. Reprint.

After the Fall

After the Fall

Quentin is a successful lawyer in New York, but inside his head he is struggling with his own sense of guilt and the shadows of his past relationships. One of these an ill-fated marriage to the charming and beautiful Maggie, who went from operating a switchboard to become a self-destructive star - a singer everyone wanted a piece of. After the Fall is often seen as the most explicitly autobiographical of Arthur Miller's plays, and Maggie as an unflinching portrait of Miller's ex-wife Marilyn Monroe, only two years after her suicide. But in its psychological acuity and depth, and its brilliant, dreamlike structure, it is a literary, and not just biographical, masterpiece.

Presence

Collected Stories

Presence

In his lifetime the great American playwright Arthur Miller published two highly regarded collections of stories, I Don't Need You Any More (1967) and Homely Girl, a Life (1995). Shortly after his death in 2005 a final collection, Presence (2007), appeared. Now, all eighteen of these stories are gathered together in one volume for the first time, including the six from Presence, previously only published in the USA. In his plays Miller took on the big themes of the day, putting stories of the Depression, wartime deceit and the McCarthy era on stage with an energy and passion not seen before and rarely since. In these stories he turns his attention to smaller, more intimate themes, yet still brings to bear the profound insight, humanism, empathy and wit of his work for the theatre. Including the early, O. Henry Award-winning 'I Don't Need You Anymore', the original story of 'The Misfits' on which the film was based, and the beautiful late story ' Presence', this collection offers a fresh perspective on the great writer and his work, here informed by an unusual sensuality and delicacy. When Homely Girl, a Life was published in America the critic for the New York Times wrote of those three stories: 'The ability to sum up in clear, unequivocal prose the essence of emotion, a situation, a theme - characteristic of Mr Miller's best writing - makes the reader wish that these stories were longer, and that there were more of them.' At last there are.